(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "73 Magazine (April 1987)"

April i mi 

Issued 1 9 








CAN $3.95 

WGK Publication 



Kenwood TS-711 A 




New Novice 
Privileges 



Introducing: 

Novice Network 



p. 78 



hi 



$8 



Table of Contents 

Dayton Digest 

If you haven't been to ihe Dayton Hamvcntion, you haven't been to a Manifest. 

WA4RPI 

***..............._.*.....•**_......_. ....*,_.*4** F .* V * TT WW n.T^ U 1 A 

QRP Antenna Farming 

Work the world from a small lot with a few Watts W0VM 

The Cellular Phony Antenna 

A two-meter mobile antenna with a twist, ,..,*.. * WA2AJQ 

Weatherproofed Antennas 

Stop rippine apart your antennas every year in the name of * * maintenance/* 

KD5UJ 

Tube Terror 

"Before you can leave, you must find an application for every tube in the 

warehouse/* .........*.. Thompson 

The Duckv Doctor 

Heat-shrink tubing is a flexible fix for your cracked rubber ducky. 

W6APZ 



Tuner Transformation 

Make the Heath SA-2500 antenna tuner truly automatic. . . Ferrand 

Reviews 



32 
36 
38 

40 

42 

44 
46 






Super Summer: DJ2UT XP706 Multiband Beam ..... . N 1EJF 20 

No vertigo: Glen Martin Engineering M185A Tower . « . N 1EJF 21 

Table for two?: Kenwood TS-71 I A. 144-MHat Mulli mode Transceiver 

KT?R 2A 

-r r r t I ■ fr-i ■***■*+ I i r f + i-Pf I P- + + F * + <f 1- * ■ * 1 1 * P ■ ■ 4 V ■ ■- f * * 4 F t t IV J -£# Kmf 4™ 

220 amps: Tokyo Hy-Power Labs HL-22V and HL- 102V 220-MHz 

Power Amplifiers , KT2B 26 

On Ihe bench: OPTOeleetronics 1300H Frequency Counter and 

Wenzel Associates Coumer-Maic Frequency Standard . . . KT2B 27 

Novice rig: Heath H W-99 Transceiver . . . KA9HCC and KN2F 30 



Departments 



Above and Bevond 



»•«••*♦ 




QA 



74820 M 08725 M "? 1 



90 

f\ *\ W . ***** ■* ****** *.***-*. *»•*«*• 7"4 

Barter A' Bu\ ......61 

- 

Dealer Directory *...*.... 114 

JF Ull* *»»*»•*»**•**.*♦*•♦*- -a****** / " 

HAMSATS .....68 

Letters ..... * * ] 4 

List of Advertisers * 100 

Never Sav Die .4 

■ 

New Products * ***** 18 



J^ IVOIV ^ TaCKCI ■.**.....■■.**..■.«*■ ' ' 

Novice Network . , * * 78 

i r* >paijj di ion ...... -.........*■ . . . t . ii*4 

QRP 80 

^^£*%W I. ■ ■ ■ ■ a..**.****** **••**■•• 4. ./ 

QSL of the Month 10 

RTTYLoop 72 

73 International 104 

Special Events **...********** *62 

WEATHERSAT 86 





ANEW 



• Built-in AC Power Supply 

• Built-in Automatic Antenna 
Tuner 

• SSB, CW, FM, AM, RTTY 

• Direct Keyboard Entry 

• 160- 10m General Coverage 
Receiver 

• Passband Tuning plus IF Shift 

• QSK up to 60 WPM 

The IC-761 ushers in an exciting 
new era of amateur radio communica- 
tions; an era filled with all the DX J ing f 
contesting, and multi-mode operating 
pleasures of -a fresh new sunspot cycle. 
The innovative IC-761 includes all of 
today s most desired features in a sin- 
gle full-size cabinet. This is ham radio 
at its absolute best! 

Work the World, The IC-761 gives 
you the competitive edge with stand- 
ard features including a built-in AC 
power supply, automatic antenna tuner 
32 fully tunable memories, self-refer- 
encing SWR bridge, continuously vari- 
able RF output power to 100 watts in 
most modes, plus much, much more! 



Superb Design. Uncompromlsed 

Quality. A (05dB dynamic range re- 
ceiver features high RF sensitivity and 
steep skirted IF selectivity that cuts 
QRM like a knife. A 100% duty cycle 
transmitter includes a large heatsink 
and internal blower, The IC-761 trans- 
ceiver is backed with a full one-year 
warranty and ICOMs dedicated custom- 
er service with four regional factory 
service centers. Your operating enjoy- 
ment is guaranteed! 

All Bands, All Modes Included. 

Operates all HF bands, plus it includes 
general coverage reception from 
100kHz to 30MHz. A top SSB P CW. FM. 
AM. and RTTY performer! 

Passband Tuning and IF Shift plus 

tunable IF notch provide maximum op- 
erating flexibility on SSB, CW f and 
RTTY modes. Additional features in- 
clude multiple front panel filter selec- 
tion, RF speech processor dual width 
and adjustable-level noise blanker, 
panel selectable low-noise RF preamp. 
programmable scanning, and all-mode 
squelch. The IC-761 is todays most 
advanced and elaborate transceiver! 



Direct Frequency Entry Via Front 
Keyboard or enjoy the velvet-smooth 
tuning knob with its professional feel 
and rubberized grip. 

Special CW Attractions include a 
built-in electronic keyer, semi or full 
break-in operation rated up to 60 
WPM, CW narrow filters and adjustable 
side tone. 

Automatic Antenna Tuner covers 
160-10 meters, matches 16-150 ohms 
and uses high speed circuits to follow 
rapid band shifts. 

Complementing Accessories in- 
clude the Cl-V computer interface 
adapter SM-10 graphic equalized 
mic and an EX-310 voice synthesizer. 

You're The Winner with the new 
era IC-761, See the biggest and best 
HF at your local 1COM dealer. 



ICOM 

Firs? in Communications 



ICOM America. Inc. 2380-1 I6lh Ave N.E.. Bellevue. WA 98004 Customer Service HotlineWtol 454-7619 

3150 Premier Drive. Suite 126. Irving TX 7S063 1777 Phoenix Parkway. Suite 201. Atlanta, GA 30149 

ICOM CANADA. A Division of (COM America. Inc. 3071 - *5 Road. Unit 9, Richmond. B.C. V6X 2T4 Canada 

Ml vuied specification* *ie approximate and subject to change without notice or obligation All ICOM radio* significantly exceed FCC regulations limiting spurious emissions 7ft 12ft? 




MODEL 8000 DUPLEX 

• Desk top or rack mounted versions 

• Pulse or fully regenerated tone dialing 

• Full and half duplex operation 

• Half duplex privacy mode 

• Internally squelched audio 

• Powerful toll call protection 

• Secret toll override code 

• # up # down or multi-digit access 

• Ringout 

• End to end signalling (DTMF standard) 

• Auto answer on 1st, 2nd, 4th or 8th incoming ring 

• Mobile to mobile signalling 

• Telephone initiated control mode 

• Dip switch selectable hybrid compensation capacitance. 

• Programmable timout and mobile activity timers with unique beeps 

• Disconnect beep 

• Separate repeat level control 

• Lightning protection 

• Connectors tor options 

• 10-1 6VDC powered 

28 dip switches make all features 
selectable. 

OPTIONS 

8001 ANI code validator (up to 1024 access codes) 

8002 1000 call two tone signal ling 

8003 32 cal I CTCSS signalling 

8004 FCC registered coupler 
6005 Centralized computer billing system 















MODEL i«n 

J • 






.■"»■ 


•*mbtt nice i w 
J — * - ft 


DUPLEX INTERCONNECT 


+ 









MODtLIHO 



*— * -m 



DUPUX INTERCONNECT 



user programmable and 



NOW ANYONE CAN ENJOY FULL DUPLEX! 

Merely connect a CSI Model 8000 to any duplex base (such as the 
Yaesu FT-2700RH) and presto. . .you have an Instant full duplex 
mobile telephone system! 

Or, the 6000 can be connected to any repeater for shared use. A 
landline caller can selectively call any mobile on the system with 
(end to end) regenerated DTMF (standard), CTCSS (optional) or two 
tone sequential (optional). Mobiles can even selectively call 
each other ! 

Knowing the correct code, a caller can take control of the 8000 from 
any touch phone and voice communicate with mobiles that are not 
equipped with touch dialers. 

No other duplex patch otters so much for so little. 



FIRST CLASS FEATURES and PERFORMANCE 

. . . COACH FARE! 

MAKE YOUR MOBILE TELEPHONE SYSTEM FLY WITH A PATCH FROM CSI 



PRIVATE PATCH III 




A high performance VOX based patch for simplex systems and for 
operation through remotely located repeaters, 

Thousands of Private Patch Ill's are in both amateur and com- 
mercial use worldwide. Private Patch III enjoys a reputation that is 
second to none, 

CW ID and other powerful features make Private Patch III the best 
deal going in Vox Simplex phone patches! 



MODEL 




For exemplary simplex performance, the CS-9500 control station inter- 
connect incorporates a full Vi second of landline to mobile electronic 
voice delay. Voice delay assures compatibility with the slowest 
CTCSS or trunked repeater systems. 

Attractively styled to complement any decor 



• Three simple connections to base radio 

• Simplex operation (VOX, of course) 

• Digital "fast VOX' 1 

• Toll restrict 

• Secret toll disable code 

• Selectable tone or pulse dialing 



STANDARD FEATURES (Both models) 

• Automatic busy signal disconnect 

• Control interrupt timer 

(maintains positive control in simplex mode) 

• Three digit access code (eg. * 73) 

• Ringout (reverse patch) 

• Ringout inhibit if channel is In use 



• Lightning protectors 

• Spare relay position 

• 110VAC supply 

• And much more 

OPTIONS: 12 VDC or 230 VAC power 
FCC registered coupler 





connect Systems Inc. 

23731 Madison St. 

Torrance CA 90505 

Phone: (213) 373-6803 



AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPl* 

,HV 

BAA A * ELECTRO*l»CS CORF 
Nm Vorti. KY 

■Mt«C 

WupADfldgH. VA 

ERCKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

Chicago IL 

HAM RADIO OUTLET 

Anilwni CA. Btfhftpir* CA 
I CA. f*0«ftci AZ. 
i CA. V*n fhtt% CA 



HI N AT RADIO 
LP* Anpttw CA 

m TEMUfflOMAt RAW3 



Mimn FL 

JUNS ELECTRONICS 
Cutwr CltV CA 

MADISON ELECTRONICS 

SUPPLY 

HcifBlon, TX 

MUMt RADIO CENTER COAP 

MlHIU Fl 



Ft LauOVW* MhvnFL 

OMNI ELECTRONICS 
Ljrctfo. TX 



NAG DISTRIBUTING COUP 

V i" f L 

PACE EMONEXAUril 

lucumAZ 

TME HAM STATION 
Etwil will* m 

westcont 

S*n Mwcoi, CA 

CANADA; 

CARTEL ELECTRON*: 

DISTRIBUTORS 
S«rr*i ftC 

SKYVAVE RADIO SYSTEMS. LT&L 

BjTafr,. BC 

COM. WEST RAOtO SYSTEMS LTO 



^12 










INSTRUMENTS 




$37995 



20 MHZ Dual Trace 
Oscilloscope 

Ven. SensiEiYiiy:5mv-2t}V>div standard rn 12 steps 
Bandwidth;DC DC 20MHZ AC 10HZ 20WHZ Rim 
Tim#jiess than 17 ns Input Impedance:* Megohm 20 pF 
Max Incut VortaQe6QG VAC P-P Operaiing Modes: 
CHACH^B,Add]jual Honz:0 2usA*v to 5 s/drv 
Magnification: 5 X Tn$genngau)Q.rormai X-Y operation 
with Z input Max Voltage: 50 VAC CRT: 8 XlO drv 
(1 div - 1 cm) Acceleration Voltage:? KV Size :295mm X 
165mm X 355mm Weight:? kg Also includes 2 10 1 direct 
probes, iriuucilon manual. 
Part No SI . *" l 1 



10 MHZ Triggering 
Oscilloscope 



$219" 



Vert. Sensitivity :5mV'SV/d(v standard in 4 steps BandwKfth: 
0C-DC-10MHZ,AC 1QHZ lOMHZ Input lmpedance:1 
Megohrn,35 pf Max Input Voltage:&0O VAC P-P Honz:0 .5 

ns/div lo 0.5 &/d>v Tnggering:fluto, nanuexl. X-Y operation 
wrth 1 input. Max Vottage:50 VAC CRT:8 X 10 div, 3" 
found Acceleration VoLtaga:2 KV Size: Ttk " X 6V*" X 12" 
Weight: 9 vj lbs Also includes 11 direct probe, 
instruction manual 
Pan No 3T1-200 




6.5 MHZ Oscllloscope$ 1 5975 

Ven Sensitivity; lOmWdw standard in 4 steps Bandwidth: 
DC DC-6 5MHZ AC20HZ*SMHZ Input Impedance: 1 
Megonm35 pf Mas Inpus VoUage:600 VAC P P CRTB X 
10 d.v, 3 M round Accelefation Voltage 2 KV Size:6v* X 
6Vfc" X 12V* "' Weight:8Vr lbs Also includes instruction 
manual, 1:1 direct probe. 
Part No 3TM00 




|FLU * EI Touch-Hold DMM 

DCV:320mv,3 2v,32v H 320v.t000V ACV:3.2v,32v,320v,7S0v 
DC Current:32mA,320mA f 10A 

AC Cufrem:32fnA,320mA,lOA Resistance :32G\3 2K h 32M 
DC Input Impedance: 10 Meg orims Also built in conimuily 
beeper Fuse protected Includes test leads, instruction 
manual See 6 55" X 2 95 X 1 XT Weight 10 q* 
Rufca number 77 ^40AQC 

Older Part Nc 3T2-?77 3> U5f ffa 

DMM w/HFE Tester 

DC V:2DOmV,2V,20V ,200V, 1000V AC V :200V, 1000V 

DC Current:2MuA.2mA.20mA,20GmA.10A 

Re3i3tance:2K.20K.200K,2M AC/DC Input impedance: TOM 

ohm Diode check Transistor hFe measurement Includes 

test leads, spare 'use, instruction manual 

Siz«:i7 5*6 5*3 6cm Weighl:27Qg C1Q95 

Part No 3T2* 2 • 1 fM 

2 73 Amateur Radio » April, 1987 




TOOLS £ 



$74«* 




Controlled Output ... .. 
Soldering Station Welter 

60 Wall soldering station capable o( nandjtng 3 temperature 
ranges: 60OT, fuOT, and 800°F automafccaily Sate for IC 
sobering Furnished w*n */„" tip PTA 7 (3S6 57QA} 
Wetter No WTCPH 
Order Pan No 335-570 



$48»5 




□ Safe, no open Hame D Only 7 inches long, Va" Dia., 3 
oz. G Adjustable^ with 1 G 6Q W power □ No cords or bat- 
teries _J Averages 60 minutes on one refill Heats and 
coofe m seconds 
Pari No 3SS-700 



23 Pc. Tool Kit w/Dlgltal DMM 



Includes: Q 1 Digital DMM Meter 1. 1 Tool Case, 14 *i& x 10 
x & V 4 M n 1 Pocket Screwdriver 1 Pocket Phillips 
Screwdriver O Jewelers Screwdriver Kit U 5 Miniature Nul 
Drivers U 4" Tweezers D 1 rot! Electrical Tape □ 1 Preci- 
sion Oder O 1 Long Nose Phere u 6 Slip Jomt Ptters O 
5" Parts Pefcef Upper □ 3 Philips Screwdnvef* 
Pan Nc 3FA-206 
H£G PR«CE Si 09 44 




SUPPLIES 




Cleanse Action® 



Part No 3A1-100 



24 qx 



$395 $375 

Mi MJP 



124JP 



Lube-on Action® $325 $2 90 

Pan Ho 3A2-10D 16 02 Ml 

Compressed Air Action® 

Pan No 3AM 00 10 oz $2 ftB 

t-i 1 

Flux Remover Action® 

Part No 3A1-200 16 OS. $3 7i S3 25 

Ml 124JP 

Freez Action® 

Part No. 3CM0O 15 M. 



$2™ 

12 UP 



$335 $285 

Ml ia-up 



Regulated Soldering Station 

D Multiple reguEaied temperature soldering iron with *{■&' 
tip G Line voyage 1 10V, 50£C HZ ;_J 4S Wans, 24 VDC. 
10QQC-50O9Q Q 5% temperature variances 3 Low tip 
vefage leakage D Continuous temperature adjustable D 4 
^ t "W x 6" k 3"H. 4 t» 
Pan No 38&-300 

Portable Butane Soldering Iron MOD-U-BOX 






The MOD U-BOX Genes presents a wide choice of small 
electrons cabinets, Distinctively styled MOD-U-BOX offers 
rugged high quality construction at an exceptionally low 
price Made from aluminum Smpje two piece design 
Oven-caKed rinsh 8LUE and OFF^WBtTE catKiets m stock 
tor i mif iff i B te dekvery Modif canons. Irvpom rnodincaftons 
made to your speedtcsbons mCkJde stBtsaeening, verting, 
cul-outi, €to 

OUTSIDE DIMENSIONS, INCHES 

CEI No. A B C D E F PfllCE 



2Q3-4#1Q 


£**£ 


5^„ 


9^ lt 


MA 


'•J A 


NA 117*' 


W13- J4# 


2** 


«% 


6^1* 


N* 


6% 


.f12» 


303-971 


3V ( 


t -, 


5 V* 


NA 


5*a 


1 . t i4- 


?G 3-4 1010 


3 V, 


10 


10 


1 


■3 ^n 


1 v« MT 1 * 


aa*-*i?ii 


3 ,J =^ 


' • E 


10 '»*„ 


9 3 r< 


a •¥■ 


na |2ft» 


203-5** 


A W n 


5 ,3 /. B 


V ■-« 


4 V a 


4<V« 


NAt1fi» 


2Q3-2Bi 


1 tJ Ai 


4 1 =/ 1# 


4 »i» B 


2 V fl 


. " ■ .. 


1 v lt 11 3» 


2G3JT* 


2% 


6 " i 


S'V* 


2^m 


3 1 f, 


j.iiia** 


JG3J1011 


2'%,* 


9% 


10'^» 


I 


9 ™ii 


. tie* 


20M1111 


2'Vrt 


IS ^« 


10^„ 


" 


5^,1 


1 % S2t« 


aos-sitio 


A^n 


B"^« 


9"^t 


■ ■ . 


e '/„ 


i^MT" 


2Q^i1f10 


:. . 


II --Vie, 


9'»/,« 


3 


?*f 9 


2^ lft |33» 



CTS ENCLOSURES 

A complete and compatiOie fan% ol value engineered 
cabinets and verbcai rack enclosures which meet the 
highest standards or puakty , versatility and ease oJ use are 
also ava*tabte aft a surprising^ modest pr<re 



D See Us At The '87 Hamvention In Dayton 

D All Products Have A Full Two Year Warranty 

D Mastercard And Visa Accepted 

□ All Orders Shipped Within 24 Hours 

D Call Toll Free U.S. & Canada 

1-800-543-3568 



*-270 



CONSOLIDATED 

ELECTRONICS 

70S Waterwk* Ave > Dayton, Oho 454202S99 (513) 252-5662 Tete. 2m 229 Fax No 513-2524066 



JVeur MFJ-1274 lets you work VHF and HF packet 
with built-in tuning indicator for $169.95 . • . 

. . . you get MFJ's latest clone of TAPR's TNC-2, TAPR's VHF/HF modem and 
built-in tuning indicator that features 20 LEDs for easy precise tuning 



MFJ-1274 

$169" 

MFJ 1270 

$13995 




Now you can join the exciting world of 
packet radio on both VHF and HF bands with a 
precision tuning indicator . * ■ for an incredible 
$169.95! 

You get MRTs top quality clone of the highly 
acclaimed industry standard TAPR TNC-2. We've 
made TAPR's modem selectable for both VHF and 
HF operation, added their precision 20 segment LED 
tuning indicator* a TTL seriaJ port, an easily 
replaceable lithium battery for memory back-up and 
put it ail in a new cabinet. 

If you don't need the tuning indicator or the 
convenience of a switchablc VlfF/HF modem, choose 
the affordable MFJ- 1270 for $139.95, 

All you need to operate packet radio is a 
MFJ-1274 or MFJ- 1 270. your rig, and any home 
computer with a RS-232 serial port and terminal 
program. 

If you have a Commodore 64, 128. or VIC 20 you 
can use MFJ's optional Starter Pack to get on the air 
immediately. The Starter Pack includes interfacing 
cable, terminal software on disk or tape and 
complete instructions . * .everything you need to get 
on packet radio. Order MFJ- 1282 (disk) or MFJ 1283 
(tape), SI 9.95. 

Unlike machine specific TNCs you never have to 
worry about your MFJ-1274 or MFJ- 1270 becoming 
obsolete because you change computers or because 
packet radio standards change. You can use any 
computer with an RS-232 serial port with an 
apropriate terminal program. If packet radio 
standards change, software updates will be made 
available as TAPR releases them. 

Also speeds in excess of 56K bauds are possible 
with a suitable external modem! Try that with a 



Order any product from MFJ and try it - 
no obligation, If not satisfied return within 
30 days for prompt refund (less shipping). 
• One year unco rut a ion a I guarantee • Add 
$5.00 each shippjng/handling * Call nr wriic Jor 
Dw catalog, ovr r 100 products. 



machine specific TNC or one without hardware 
HDLC as higher speeds come into widespread use. 

You can also use the MFJ* 1274 or MFJ- 1270 as 
an excellent but inexpensive digipeater to link other 
packet stations. 

Both feature AX. 25 Level 2 Version 2 software, 
hardware HDLC for full duplex, true Data Carrier 
Detect for HF, multiple connects, 256K EPROM. 16K 
RAM (expandable to 32K with optional EPROM), 
simple operation, socketed ICs plus much more. 

You get an easy- to-read manual, a cable to 
connect your transceiver (you have to add a 

connector for your particular radio), a connector for 

the TTL serial port and a power supply for 110 VAC 

operation (you can use 12 VDC for portable, remote 

or mobile operation I 

Help make history! Join the packet radio 

revolution now and help spread this exciting network 

throughout the world. Order the top quality and 

affordable MFJ-1274 or MFJ- 1270 toda\ \ 




MFJ-1273. 549.95 




Now you can tune tn 
HF, OSCAR and other non 
FM packet stations fast! 

This MFJ clone of the TAPR 
tuning indicator makes 
tuning natural and easy - - it shows you which 
direction to tune. All you have to do is to center a 
single LED and you're precisely tuned in to within 
10 Hz. 20 LEDs give high resolution and wide 
frequency coverage. 

The MFJ- 1273 tuning indicator plugs into the 
MFJ- 1270 and all TNC- Is, TNC-2s and clones that 
have the TAPR tuning indicator connector. 



To Order or for Your Nearest Dealer 



MFJ ENTERPRISES. INC. 

Box 494 Miss Siair- MS 39762 



800-647-1800 

Cull 6G I -323-5869 In Miss, and 
outside continental USA. 
Teicx 53 459G MFJ STKV 




H 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • March, 1987 3 




EVER SAY DIE 



BEWARE! 

Readers have been concerned 
over a rather clever new business 
(scam?). Letters have been going 
out to hams who haven*! renewed 
their tickets offering to renew 
them for a measly $35. 

The letters are from Federal Li- 
censing, J. V., Amateur Radio Ser- 
vice Division— and Lordy, they're 
from Gettysburg — with an alter- 
nate address in McLean, Virginia* 
the home of the CIA! Here's my 
$35. fellas. 

Of course, the alternative is to 
be a cheapskate and spend 22c to 
do the same thing, but without the 
professional help of FLJV7ARSD. 
Have you ever heard anyone even 
suggest that hams are cheap- 
skates? Well . . . yes . . , come to 
think of it. I've heard that calumny 
a whole lot. 




After I got through chuckling at 
the audacity of the approach, I re- 
membered a lovely old scam. 
There was this clipping service 
that sent out letters to hams in* 
forming them that their name had 
recently appeared in a national ra- 
dio publication. Now T for only $5 
(or some such), this outfit would 
send you a copy of the clipping. 
Wow! They must have mentioned 
me in a ham magazine! $5 later 
you'd get a snip from the Catt- 
book with your name and address. 
Now I call that creative sales! And 
a lot easier than going to some 
silly remote island and shaking 
down Honor Rollers for a hundred 
bucks a head for a new DXCC 
country. 

Let's see, I wonder how much 
an "office" in Gettysburg would 
cost? All I'd need would be a sim- 
ple mail drop — then I could open 



M*F«i Wi«ihHigton ( D.C 
P.Q B» 776 
MCUan VA 22101 



FEDERAL LICENSING. J.V. 
AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE DIVISION 



Gettysburg, PA 
PO Bon 610 
GettytiiwaPA 17325 



Our review ol FCC records has revealed thai Ihe radio station au (horitaiion - LICENSE - which 
you Mreregranlmi within the AMATEUR RADJO SERVICE has EXPIRED A3 you ary aware, it Lb a 
violation of FCC Rules to opera!" a radio system without proper authorial ion, 

If you wish to renew your license, we car* assist you in I he preoaral>on and filing oi the documen- 
tation required to obtain a curpqni license To laciiitale this, simply follow exactly the steps 

betmr. 



1 Bev«w end coned if necessary the informal not; contained on the address label befcmr 

2 Pf MM trie nam* and telephone number of the pet son eg coniad where tndi ca l e d 

3 Aitach compiled form to your service and preparation lee payment of £35 00 Please make 
your check payable to Federal Licensing, J.V. 

4, Mail ail Mams noted In "3" using Ihe envelope provided, 

Expired licensees presently have a grace period of 2 years to renew and retain their call sign. II 
Ihe license expires lor a period Of 5 years, the applicant is then required 1o re-test Ait new 
amateur licenses are now gfanied for a period of 10 years 

Federal! Ucnwng is the onty hcenwng organization located aojaceni to the FCC Amateur 
Branch in Gettysburg. PA, Additional ■ a a aslfl fice regarding your licensing needs » ah* ays a»aii 
atte by calling u* al (7 17) 334-9262 between 9 00 AM and 400 PM 

Sincerely. 



John A HI en nek 
Federal Licensing 



if you receive a tetter tike this from "Federal Licensing^ J.V./' pitch it. 
You can save $34, 78 by ignoring the tetter and renewing your ticense 
yourself. 

4 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



the Federal Communications Li- 
censing Authority— charge a dis- 
count $25 for renewing licenses— 
and use the money to finance an 
episode on Lifestyles of the Rich 
and Famous. 

There being no intelligence test 
given as part of the amateur radio 
exam. Til bet I'd clean up. Say. 
I'll bet most CBers don't know 
there aren't any CB licenses any 
more. , another even more 
promising vein to mine. I could 
start issuing operating permits 
from my Federal Communications 
Licensing Authority — complete 
with the sale of special callsigns. 
For $25 extra, I'd authorize the 
use of cartop flashing lights and 
an emergency communications 
decal for the car door. 

Small business is the life blood 
of America— right? So let's be 
creative in thinking up new small 
businesses. Now, I wonder if I 
can get Federal Licensing, J.V, to 
advertise their marvelous service 
in 731 

OUR 50-YEAR-OLD 
TRAFFIC SYSTEM 

A message sent via the ARRL 
National Traffic System arrived 
this morning. It had to do with a 
coming visit from a Kansas ham. 
Well, that was nice— except the 
message was delivered three 
days short of a month after it was 
sent and the chap had visited a 
couple weeks ago. 

How about it, you fanatic ARRL 
members, is constructive criti- 
cism uncalled for — out ol line — 
blasphemy? Am I a candidate for 
the lunatic fringe if I even suggest 
that we're close to the 90s— and 
not the 1890s— that perhaps it's 
getting time to get the delivery 
time down to two weeks on mes- 
sages? One would think that our 
advances in technology should 
somehow be usable to get traffic 
through within seconds anywhere 

Continued on page 10 



QRM 



Editorial Offices 

WGE Center 

Peterborough NH 0345&-1 W- 

phone 6G3-52S4201 

Advertising Offices 

WG£ Center 

Peterborough NN 034&&-1 194 

phone: 800^25-5083 

Circulation Offices 

WGE Center 

Peterborough NH 03450-1 1 94 

phone :6Q3-52$-42Q.1 

Manuscripts 

Contributions in Ihe form of manu- 
scripts with drawings and/or photo 
graphs are welcome ar>d will be con- 
sidered tor possible publication We 
can assume no responsibility for loss 
or damage to any material Please en- 
close a stamped,, self-addressed en- 
velope with each submission. Pay- 
ment for the use of any unsolicited 
material will oe made upon accep- 
tance. All contributions should be d<- 
rected to the 73 editorial offices. "How 
to Write for 73" guidelines are avail- 
able upon request. US Citizens must 
Include their social security number 
with submi Hod manuscripts 



Subscription Information 

Rates m trie United States and Pos- 
sessrons One Year (12 issues) 
S24.B7; Two Years (24 issues) $45 47, 
Elsewhere Canada and Mexico— 
$39.00/1 year only. US funds Foreign 
surface mail— $45-00/1 year only, US 
funds drawn an US bank. Foreign air 
mail— please Inquire. To subscribe, re- 
new or change an address: Write to 
Subscription Department. PO Box 
931, Farmsngdale NV 11737 Return 
postage guaranteed For renewals 
and changes of address, include the 
a dd r e ss label from your most recent 
issue of 73 For gift subscriptions in- 
clude your name and address as weir 
as Those ot gift recipients For ques- 
tions concerning your subscription, 
call loN free 1-800-227-5782. To place 
subscription orders, please call us toll 
free at 1-800-722-7790 between 9 am 
and 4:30 pm Eastern time or write to 
73, Subscription Department, PO Boa 
931. Farmingdate NY 11737 73 Ama- 
teur Radio (ISSN 0745480X) is pub- 
lished monthly by WGE Publishing, 
WGE Center. Peterborough NH 
034 S8- 1194 Second class postage 
paid at Peterborough NH 03458 and at 
additional mailing offices Canadian 
second class mail registration number 
9566. Entire contents copyright © 
1986 WGE Publishing AH rights re- 
served No part of this publication may 
be reprinted or otherwise reproduced 
without written permission from the 
publisher Microfilm Edition— Unwer- 
srty Mrcrol.lm. Ann Arbor Ml 48106 
Postmaster Send address changes 
10 73 Amateur Radio, Subscription 
Services, PO Box 931. Farmingdale 
NY 1 1737. Nationally distributed by In- 
ternational Circulation Distributors. 
Contract: Warning— the mere posses- 
sion ot this magazine completes a le- 
gally binding contract between you 
and The Publisher , whether you have 
read this or not. Ignorance of the taw ts 
no excuse as you're quite weJI aware 
You are hereby directed, under every 
penalty of law lo which this legal con- 
iract exposes you, lo henceforth 
spend a minimum of 1 0% of your oper- 
ating time working Novices end mak- 
ing amateur radio more fun for them. 
This is Ihe ham version of ti thing No 
excuses will be accepted, so don't 
start whining il The Publisher visits 
your shack and demands to see your 
station logs for proof of your perfor- 
mance under this contract Just be- 
cause This is The April issue Of 73 ts no 
reason to fool around 



220 : Kenwood 



TM-3530A 

The first comprehensive 
220 MHz FM transceiver 

TM-3530A-25 watts of 220 MHz FM- 
Kenwood style! Features include 
built-in 7- digit telephone number 
memory, auto dialer, direct frequency 
entry and big LCD. All this makes the 
TM-3530A the most sophisticated 
rig on 220 MHz! 

• First mobile transceiver with tele- 
phone number memory and auto- 
dialer (up to 15 seven-digit telephone 
numbers) 

• Frequency range 220-225 MHz 

• Automatic repeater offset selection— 
a Kenwood exclusive! 

• Direct keyboard entry of frequency 

• 23-channel memory for offset fre- 
quency and sub-tone 




Big multi-color LCD and back- lit con- * Frequency lock switch 

trols for excellent visibility • Digital Channel Link (DCL) option 

Optional front panel programmable 38- • High performance GaAs FET front 
tone CTCSS encoder includes 97,4 Hz end receiver 




TH-31BT/31A 

Kenwood's advanced tech- 
nology brings you a new 
standard in pocket/handheld 
transceivers! 

•1 watt high. 150mW low 

• Super compact and lightweight 
(about 8 oz. with PB-21 1 ) 

• Frequency range 220-224.995 MHz 
in 5- kHz steps 

• BT Series has built-in tone 
•Repeater offset: -1.6 MHz, reverse, 

simplex 

Supplied accessories: rubber flex 
antenna, earphone, wall charger. 180 
mAH NiCd battery and wrist strap 

• Quick change, locking battery case 



TH-31BT/31A optional accessories: 

• HMC-1 headset with VOX 

• SMC-30 speaker microphone 
« PB-21 NiCd 180 mAH battery 

• PB-21H NiCd 500 mAH battery 
*DC-21 DC-DC converter for 

mobile use 

• BT-2 manganese/alkaline battery 
case 

• EB-2 external C manganese/ 
alkaline battery case 

• SC-8/8T soft cases with belt hook 

• TU-6 programmable sub-tone unit 

• AJ-3 thread-loc to BNC female 
adapter 

• BC-6 2-pack quick charger 

• BC- 2 wall charger for PB-21 H 

• RA-9A Stubby Duk antenna , 
i BH-3 belt hook 



16- key DTMF pad, with audible 
monitor 

Center-stop tuning-another 
Kenwood exclusive! 

New 5-way adjustable mounting 
system 

Unique offset microphone connector 
-relieves stress on microphone cord 

HI/LOW power switch (adjustable 
LOW power) 





TM- 3530A optional accessories: 

• TU-7 38-tone CTCSS encoder 

• MU-1 DCL modem unit 

• VS-1 voice synthesizer 

• PG-2N extra DC cable 

• PG-3B DC line noise filter 

• MB-10 extra mobite bracket 

• CD-10ca11 sign display 

• PS-430 DC power supply 



• MC-60A/MC-80/MC-85 deskmics. 

• MC-48B extra DTMF rnic with UP/DOWN switch 

• MC-43S UP/DOWN mic. 

• MC-55 (6 pin) mobile mk;- wrth time-out timer 

• SP-40 compact mobile speaker 

• SP-50B mobile speaker 

• SW-20GB SWR/power meter 

• SW-100B compact SWR/power meter 



TH-31BT wrtti DTMF pad shown 
Optional RA-9A attached 



KENWOOD 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut Street 
Complon, California 90220 



Compters service manuals are available tor alt Trm* Kenwood transceivers antf most accessories. 
Spectftca ffOfJs ancf pfices are suD/ecf to change without notice or obftgauon 







^pacesetter in Amateur radio 



Here's One forVJbu! 



TM-22W421A 



2 m and 70 cm FM compact 
mobile transceivers 

The all-new TM-221A and TM-421A 

FM transceivers represent the "New 
Generation" in Amateur radio equip- 
ment* The superior Kenwood GaAs 
FET front end receiver; reliable and 
clean RF amplifier circuits, and new 
features all add up to an outstand- 
ing value for mobile FM stations! 
The optional RC-10 handset/control 
unit is an exciting new accessory 
that will increase your mobile 
operating enjoyment! 

• TM-221A provides 45 W. TM-421A 
is the first 35 W 70 cm mobile! 

Both models have adjustable 5 W 
low power 

• Selectable frequency steps 

for quick and 
easy QSY. 



• TM-221A receives from 138- 
173.995 MHz. This includes the 
weather channels! Transmit range 
is 144-148 MHz. Modifiable for MARS 
and CAP operation. (MARS or CAP 
permit required.) 

• The TM-421A covers 438-449.995 

MHz. (Specifications guaranteed for Amateur 
band use ontyj 

• Built-in front panel selection of 38 
CTCSS tones. TSU-5 programmable 
decoder optional. 

• Simplified front panel controls 
makes operating a snap 1 

• 16 key DTMF hand mic, mic. hook, 
mounting bracket, and DC power 
cable included. 

• Packet radio compatible! 

• Kenwood non-volatile operating 
system, Al! functions remain intact 

even when lithium battery 
back-up fails. (Lithium cell 
memory back-up— 
est, life 5 yrs.) 



Optional Accessories: 

• RC-10 Multifunction handset remote controller 

* PG-4G Extra control cable, allows TM-22W 
TM-421A full duplex operation • PS-507PS-430 
DC power supplies • TSU-5 ! 'rogrammable CTCSS 
decoder • SUM 00 A Compact SWA/power/volt 
meter 0.3-150 MHz) * SW-100B Compact SWR/ 
power No\t meter (140-450 MHz) * SW-200A SWR/ 
power meter (1 8-150 MHz) * SW-200B SWU/power 
meter (140-450 MHz) • SWT*1 Compact 2 m 



antenna luner (200 W PEP) • SWT-2 Compact 
70 cm antenna tuner (200 W PEP) » SP-40 Com- 
pact mobile speaker • 3P-50B Mobile speaker 

* PG-2N Extra DC cable ■ PG-3B DC line notse 
filter • MC-60A, MC-80, MC-85 Base station mics. 

* MC-55 f 9-pin) Mobile mk;. with gooseneck and 
lime-out timer • MA -4000 Dual band antenna with 
duplexes (mount not supplied) * MB-201 Extra 
mobile mount 



• 14 full-function memory channels 
store frequency, repeater offset, 
sub-tone frequencies, and repeater 
reverse information. Repeater offset 
on 2 m is automatically selected. 
There are two channels for "odd 
split" operation. 

• Programmable band scanning. 

• Memory scan with memory 
channel lock-out. 

• Super compact : 

approx. V1/2''Hx5-1/2''Wx7''a 

• New amber LCD display; 

• Microphone test function on low 
power, 

• High quality, top-mounted speaker. 

• Rugged die-cast chassis and 
heat sink. 




RC-10 Remote Controller 

Optional telephone-styte handsel 
remote controller RC-10 is specially 
designed for mobile convenience 
and safety. All front panel controls 
(except DC power and RF output 
selection) are controllable from the 
RC-10. One RC-10 can be attached 
to either or both TM-221A and 
TM-421A with the optional PG-4G 
cable. When both transceivers are 
connected to the RC-10, cross 
band, full duplex repeater opera- 
tion is possible. (A control operator 
is needed for repeater 
operation.) 




Specifications anopf tees subject m change wtthout nonce Qt obligation 

Complete service manuals are avatfable tot all Tnofienwood transceivers and most accessories 



KENWOOD 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 WestWalnul Street 
Compton, California 90220 






QRX 



EDITED BY PERRY DONHAM KW1Q 



Novice Enhancement Is Here! 



AFTER NEARLY A YEAR of anticipation, the 
Federal Communications Commission has 
announced the approval of PR Docket 86-161 , 
ushering in a system of new and exciting privi- 
leges for Novice operators. Effective March 
21 , 1987, at 0001 UTC, Novices will be able to 
use all amateur modes on three bands in the 
HF t VHF, and UHF ranges. (Note thai, al- 
though we are talking specifically about 
Novices here, due to the structure of the 
present license system, Technician-class op- 
erators also gain the new privileges.) 

On 10 meters, Novices can operate CW and 
digital modes from 28,1-28.3 MHz, and CW 
and SSB from 28.3-28.5 MHz. Novices and 
Technicians are limited to 200 Watts output in 
this subband; all other licenses may use the 
full legal limit. 

On 1.25 meters, all modes may be used 
from 222.10-223.91 MHz, with a power output 
not greater than 25 Watts. 

On 0.23 meters* the subband runs from 
1270-1295 MHz. with a power restriction of 5 

Watts. 

In every case, Novice stations may not be 
set up as a repeater or auxiliary station, and a 
Novice cannot be the trustee of a repeater, 
even if the repeater's input and output fre- 
quencies fail within a Novice subband. I'm 
certain that this does not imply that digipeat- 
ing is forbidden when using packet. 

The commission specifically prohibits the 
use of AM by Novices in the new 10-meter 
subband. 

The test for the Novice license will be ex- 
panded by adding 10 questions (for a total of 
30) covering the new privileges. It's clearly 
understood, though, that the test should be no 
more difficult than the current Novice test 
Another change requires two examiners to 
administer the test; the Novice testing pro- 
gram will not, however, be run under the 
present Volunteer Examiner system. 

The present examination for Technician 
and General class is being split into two 
pieces. Each piece will deal more exclusively 
with the privileges that come with the license 
being tested for. That way, a Novice going for 
Technician will not have to deal with modes 
and techniques that apply only to General- 
class operation. 

The complete text of the FCC's Report and 
Order is on page 48. 

The Wisdom 
of Solomon 

THE GOVERNMENT GIVETH and the gov- 
ernment taketh away, it looks as if a pyrrhic 



victory of sons has been achieved with the 
adoption of PR Docket S6-1 61, giving Novices 
220 voice privileges for the first time! For on 
February 1 2, the FCC released General 
Docket 87*1 4, a Notice of Proposed Rule 
Making that would delete 220-222 MHz from 
the amateur service and reallocate it to land 
mobile services on an exclusive basis. 222- 
225 MHz would now become an exclusive am- 
ateur allocation if this NPRM became law, 

It would appear that the FCC has finally tired 
of the long dispute over 220 and has tried to 
appease both sides by cutting the "baby" in 
half! While firm action on their part to give 
exclusive status to an amateur allocation on 
220 is admirable, the plain truth is that a sub- 
stantial number of weak-signai enthusiasts, 
EME operators, simplex links, and packet sta- 
tions will, in effect, be forced off the air. Why? 
For the simple reason that the frequency seg- 
ment from 222-225 MHz is already filled with 
repeaters and simplex operations in many 
parts of the country. 

It wouldn't be fair or reasonable to ask those 
stations to vacate enough of the remaining 
220-MHz allocation to make up for this dis- 
placement. Not only that, it would be very diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, to consider such a re- 
design of subbands, especially in areas such 
as New York City. Chicago, and Los Angeles! 
There is no doubt that we all stand to lose from 
this proposal. The 220-MHz band is fast be- 
coming an alternative to the congestion on 2 
meters, and its unique characteristics make it 
well suited for such specialized modes as 
packet and moonbounce 



Every active ham has a stake in this NPRM 
—from manufacturers of 220 equipment to 
casual operators who rarely venture beyond 
the HF bands. Remember — once it's gone, 
it's gone for good. In the past few years, we've 
lost a good deal of our amateur satellite alloca- 
tions through WARC T a large chunk of the 
13-cm band, and from 1215 to 1240 MHz to 
non-amateur interests. . largely because we 
weren't using those allocations and didn't 
present a unified front of opposition. But the 
technology to operate on 220 is as close as 
your wallet— literally speaking. FM transceiv- 
ers and hand-helds abound, linear transvert- 
ers can be easily had. and at feast one manu- 
facturer has spent a great deal of time 
devefoping what would be the first 220-MHz 
multimode transceiver on the U,S, market. 

It is imperative that you write to the FCC and 
state your feefings about this docket. At the 
very least, the issue is too complex to wrap up 
in the short time period allocated (initial com- 
ments due April 6 f reply comments due April 
21). Consideration must be given to those op- 
erators and modes that will be left out in the 
cold by this juggling of frequencies, A strong 
voice now to save 220 might just save 70 cm 
and higher frequencies from a similar fate. Put 
your thoughts on paper. Be concise and avoid 
unnecessary diatribes. Make 12 copies of 
your comments and mail them to: Federal 
Communications Commission, 1919 M Street 
NW, Washington DC 20554. Make sure you 
clearly state the docket number (37-14) at the 
top of each copy- Most importantly; Do it to- 
day!— KT2B + 




This is Andy Broome KB4VRU from Chattanooga. Tennessee. Andy is 9 years old and recently 
got hts license from classes hetd by the John Ross ARC ', Look for Andy on 40 meters, tut do It fast 
because he's trying to upgrade so he can get on packet 

73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 7 




ASK ANY 
HAM 



THEN 
ASK FOR 



HUSTLE 

AMATEUR 

ANTENNA 

PRODU 






Please send information on your 
line of amateur antennas to: 

NAME 

ADDRESS ,«...,... 



.... 

cm* 



STATE 



I . * ri a 



STANDARD OF PERFORMANCE 



HV 



i 
I 



£ 



EB 



One Newtronics Place 

Mineral Wells. Texas 76067 

(817) 325-1386 



■269 



7$ Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



Mega- Winner 

THE BIG WINNER of 73*% Megaband 
Sweepstakes is Stanley P. Hill N9FXU of 

Oak Park, Illinois. By the time you read this 
hell be firing up his grand prize: Yaesu's FT- 
767GX all-band, all-mode transceiver. Stan 
picked up the winning entry in a newsstand 
copy of 73 at Spectronies in Oak Park. He has 
been a ham for a year and is currently a Tech- 
nician class. Stan became a ham so he could 
use a two-meter rig at work— he's a truck driv- 
er for Yellow Freight Systems. Plans for li- 
cense and equipment upgrades were already 
in the works before he got the good news, but 
the incentive to upgrade has just gone 
through the roof. 73 extends our congratula- 
tions to the lucky winner and our thanks to 
Yaesu USA for making the Megaband 
Sweepstakes possible. 



Call Again 



THE FCC has decided to make a move on the 
caltsign assignment system. PRB-3, released 
recently by the commission, states that the 
FCC would like to hand special call assign- 
ments over to a private organization. This 
way, hams could request any call ttial they like 
(remember the good old days when you could 
do that sort of thing?). The FCC would still 
issue an official license with a 2-by-3 call from 
the NA-NZ block, and the special call coordi- 
nator would keep a data base with a cross-in- 
dex available to the commission for monitor- 
g purposes. Written comments on PRB-3 
are due to the FCC by April 23> 1987. 

School Support 

THE RESPONSE OF READERS to Wayne's 
call for people to give a special S15 subscrip- 
tion to 73 to the school of their choice has been 
heartwarming. If you missed it the first time 



PVestunk 



REPORT 



THE AMATEUR IADIO NEWSLETTER 





HEAR THE LATEST? 

YOU WILL IF YOU READ 

THE WESTUNK REPORT 

S22.50/TEAR 

REQUEST YOUR FREE SAMPLE 




THE WESTUNK REPORT 

28221 Stanley Ct.. .^^ *~ 

Canyon Country, CA 91351 W* *§£' 
(805) 251-7180 machine 
(805) 251*5558 modem, entry: WLR ^133 



around, the offer is still open. If you want to 
help the hobby grow but don't have the lime to 
start a Novice class, please give this offer 
some thought. The following is a representa- 
tive sample of the many generous folks 
who've helped contribute to the future of their 
hobby: George R, Susterick. Larry D, 
Shaunce WMAKX, Mid- Michigan ARC, Ken- 
neth Cody KA1BRB. Ozark ARS, James D. 
Garts W9SKO, William E. Newkifk WB9IVR/4, 
Stanley M- Grady WB4ZTF, Frank E. Kavenik 
WA90JR, Robert P. Felton K7WLX. Matt Kolb 
NM9H t Bob May K4SE, and D. Bruce Caster 
WD4CSE. If you'd like to particlpate H send 
$15 and the complete address of the school 
to 73 Magazine, Circulation Department, 
WGE Center, Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: 
School Sub. 

Hams On Wheels 

WE RECENTLY received a request from 
Steven Rich WA1DFL 1 the Director of Handi- 
capped Affairs for the town of Revere, Mas- 
sachusetts, asking us to include wheelchair 
accessibility in our reporting of ham events. 
Steven writes: "Amateur radio has always 
had a strong tradition of brotherhood and sis- 
terhood regardless of physical ability- In keep- 
ing with this tradition, I would respectfully re- 
quest that clubs when advertising classes, 
exams, meetings, flea markets, and hamfests 
let it be known if the event is wheelchair acces- 
sible/' The vast majority of Special Event list- 
ings that we receive do NOT mention 
wheelchair accessibility. How 'bout it, publici- 
ty chairmen? 



Feedback 



YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED that the Feed- 
back card is missing from this issue. We've 
got mountains of them still to process. Feed- 
back will return on an occasional basis. 
Thanks to all who participated. 



CENTRONICS 

Amateur Radio & Computers 

6102 Deland Road • Flushing, Ml 4S433 
(313) 659-1776 



** 



YOUR PACKET CONNECTION" 



Kantronics • Microlog * AE A * Merlin 
Software for popular computers: 



AEA 

Software 



MBA-TOR 

Apple 

H-89 

DDX-64 

SWL TEXT 
IBM 

DQ-64 



Kantronics 

Software 



Hamsoft 
Amtar 

Hamtex 
Amtorsoft 
Supertap 








,,. pacesetter in Amateur radio 



« 



DX-cellence!" 



TS-940S 

The new TS-940S is a serious radio 
for the serious operator. Superb 
interference reduction circuits and 
high dynamic range receiver conn- 
bine with superior transmitter 
design to give you no-nonsense, no 
compromise performance that gets 
your signals through! The exclusive 
multi-function LCD sub display 
graphically illustrates VBT, SSB 
slope, and other features. 

• 100% duty cycle transmitter. 

Super efficient cooling system using 
special air ducting works with the inter- 
nal heavy-duty power supply to allow 
continuous transmission at full power 
output for periods exceeding one hour. 

• High stability, dual digital VFOs. 
An optical encoder and the flywheel 
VFO knob give the TS-940S a positive 
tuning leeir 

• Graphic display of operating 
features. 

Exclusive multi-function LCD sub- 



PQtWtH 



TlMtfl 



* vox wu. 



I I I I 

KENWOOD 



.SEND AUTO HAH- 



IT 



HEC TMIU WlK 



HF TRANSCEIVER TS 9*05 



MFTEN 



a a LtviL 




--JF ' ' 



display panel shows CW VBT, SSB 
slope tuning, as well as frequency, 
time, and AT- 940 antenna tuner status. 
Low distortion transmitter. 
Kenwood's unique transmitter design 
delivers top "quality Kenwood" sound. 
Keyboard entry frequency selection. 
Operating frequencies may be directly 
entered into theTS-940S without using 
the VFO knob. 
QRM-fighting features. 
Remove "rotten QRrvT with the SSB 
slope tuning, CW VBT, notch filter, AF 
tune, and CW pitch controls. 
Built-in FM P plus SSB, CW, AM, FSK 
Semi or full break-in (OSK) CW. 
40 memory channels, 
Mode and frequency may be stored in 
4 groups of 10 channels each, 
Programmable scanning. 
General coverage receiver 
Tunes from 150 kHz to 30 MHz. 
1 yr. limited warranty. 
Another Kenwood First! 

Optionat accessories: 

• AT-940 full range (160-10m) auto- 
matic antenna tuner * SP-940 external 




speaker with audio filtering • YG-455C-1 
(500 Hz). YG-455CN-1 (250 Hz), 
YK-88C-1 (500 Hz) CW filters; YK-88A-1 
(6 kHz) AM filter • VS-1 voice synthesizer 

• SO-1 temperature compensated 
crystal oscillator •MC-43S UP/DOWN 
hand mic. • MC-60A, MC-80, MC-85 
deluxe base station rnics, • PC-1A phone 
patch •TL- 922A linear amplifier 

* SM-220 station monitor » BS-8 pan 
display »SW-200A and SW-2000 SWR 
and power meters. 



NOTCH -©-SOL PITCH-*~Af TUNt 



/ H. C U U. U U ■» J*. 



HW« VI HUTt 



muprt 



MiMv^V UNCTION 



PUM 



t-f 


«• 



S*UT 



iuo/tn 



■rr m cuah wotch a* tlwm 


1 


^^B ^^^B HHI ^HB ^^H 








V, A*-r 


to 





Mrc-$-Fhwft 


AH 


D IS 


FWt 







CW VBT 



■WMPiM 



F.tQCK 












vo«=. 


g 










Compter* service manuals are available 
fofati Two -Kenwood transceivers and 
most accessortes 

Specifications and pnces ate subject to 
change wtinout notice or obligation 




MoreTS-940S information is available 
from authorized Kenwood dealers. 

KENWOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
nil West Walnut Street 
Compton, Calif of nia 90220 




EVER SAY DIE 



from page 4 

in the country — minutes around 
the world 

Tm sure there is still a need for a 
message handling system that 
takes a month to deliver the mes- 
sages. Let's see now, what would 
we use thai for? What a wonderful 
system to have in place for use in 
times of emergency, right? And 
that's supposed to be one of the 
reasons for the National Traffic 
System. I believe, Yes, I'm being 
sarcastic. 

When I got involved with RTTY 
back in 1948, 1 was impressed by 
the speed and accuracy of digital 
communications. We had to build 
our own converters at first, but as 
commercial equipment came on 
the market I expected the traffic 
handlers to go for it. In 1950 we 
had a RTTY repeater and network 
set up so any RTTY op in the 
Greater New York area could 
leave a message at an unattended 
station— complete with an ac- 
knowledgement of receipt. It 
seemed like an ideal system for 
emergencies and traffic handling. 

So here we are, almost 40 years 
later, and we 1 re stilt banging out 
messages with hand keys and tak- 
ing near a month to get 'em 
halfway across the country — from 
Kansas to New Hampshire. Wowl 
Is it any wonder we have a short* 
age of youngsters interested in 
"enjoying" our hobby? Oh, we've 
made a little progress. Vfo's re- 
placed crystals in the 40s. Side- 



band replaced AM in the 60s. Re- 
peaters replaced simplex in the 
70s. Nothing has yet replaced the 
dull 0S0, the traffic handling, or 
the DX pileups of the 30s. 

One thing modern business has 
recently releamed from the past— 
the customer is right. If you've 
read the business success and 
the excellence books, you know 
the most successful businesses 
are those that provide the prod- 
ucts and services their customers 
want, They keep asking what's 
wanted — and provide it- Amateur 
radio has been particularly resis- 
tant to this philosophy, with the 
same results we've seen in busi- 
ness—imminent bankruptcy. 

Even the most insular of ama- 
teurs is aware by now that all is not 
well with amateur radio. I'm not 
the only one pointing to our lack of 
growth— our geriatric member- 
ship — our lack of technical pro- 
gress in the last twenty years. In- 
deed, you don't hear anything 
else these days— even from the 
ARRL. 

Perhaps it's time to look at ama- 
teur radio as if it were a busi- 
ness — a nonprofit business, but 
still a business. Thus, if we're go* 
tng to keep our business going 
we're going to need new cus- 
tomers to replace those who lose 
interest or die— or both. If we're 
not holding the interest of cus- 
tomers—and not attracting new 
customers in adequate numbers 
to stay in business, it's time to ask 
the customers and potential cus- 




OSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your GSL< mail it in an envelope to 73 1 WGE Center, 70 Rte, 
202 N., Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: QSL of the Month. Winners 
receive a one-year subscription {or extension) to 73. Entries not in 
envelopes cannot be accepted. 

10 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1 987 



tomers what they want that we're 
not providing. 

One has to be deaf not to hear 
the chorus asking us, "Why 
Morse code?" Yes, there sure are 
a lot of deaf hams — at least as far 
as this emotional subject is con- 
cerned. They don't want to even 
hear about it — and there's no way 
you can get them to actually think 
about it. 

The closest thing we have in 
amateur radio to a corporate orga- 
nization is our only national soci- 
ety, the ARRL, This puts the onus 
on the League to provide us with 
guidance and leadership, The 
League got to be the one and only 
by killing off every upstart group 
that threatened their power. With 
that power is responsibility — and 
one of the major responsibilities of 
any corporation is to make sure 
the firm survives, 

Corporate executives who turn 
a blind eye and ear to the firm's 
prospective customers would nor- 
mally be ousted by the board of 
directors, in turn, directors who ig- 
nore the needs of customers, 
even over the advice of their exec- 
utives, would quickly be replaced 
by the shareholders. 

In the amateur radio hobby, the 
corporation Is the ARRL. the exec- 
utives are the HQ gang, and the 
directors are those you elect every 
two years in your division. You, as 
an ARRL member, are the share- 
holders, 

I've talked with most of the HQ 
gang and I think they're by far the 
best bunch I've seen at HQ in 50 
years. I wish 1 could say the same 
about the directors. Alas! Darn, 
there I go again, attacking the 
League. Or am I? From my view- 
point l see a serious problem— 
and I have what looks to me like a 
simple proposed solution—one 
with which I think you'll agree, if 
you're able to think about it, 

Let's go back to the analogy of 
our hobby and a business. If we 
want to keep it going, we have to 
provide services which in some 
way pay for our license to use pub- 
lic property: our frequencies. 
We Ve let our customer base grow 
old and feeble and have resisted 
attracting new customers, Am I 
being unfair to suggest there's an 
element of responsibility for the 
League to solve this problem? 

The League is an $6 million a 
year business these days, That's 
about the same order of magni- 
tude as my Digital Audio maga- 
zine, so I have a fair grasp of what 
it takes to run that size business, 
Businesses of any size have 
boards of directors (like the 




TAFF 



PUBLISHER 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
Stuart Norwood 



MANAGING EDITOR 
Chris Schmidt KA1 MPL 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 
Steve Jewett KA1 MPM 

INTERNATIONAL EDITOR 
Richard Phenix 

copy editor 

Robin Florence KA1 PNR 

ASSOCIATES 

MikeBryCftWBdVGE 

Petty Donham KW 1 

John Edwards KI2U 

Bin Gosney KE7C 

Jim Gray WlXU 

Dr. Marc Leave y WA3AJR 

Andy MacMiiter WA5ZIB 

Bill Pasternak WABITF 

Harold Price NK6K 

Paler Putm an KT28 

Mike Stone WSaOCO 

Or. Ralph Taggart WB8DQT 



AUTOifiECTOR 
Dianne R itson 

PHOTOGRAPHER 
David Uifer N2ESS 



ADVERTISING 
1-603-525-4201 
1-800 225-5083 

SALES MANAGER 
Nancy Clarnpa-Mallette 

ADVERTISING SALES 
JimGodronNlEJF 

SALES SEA VfCES MANAGER 
Hope Cumer 



WGE PUBLISHING, INC. 

VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLISHING 
JimConnell 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 
Richard Yee 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
David P Raether 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Peter M Gaviomo 

NEWSSTAND MANAGER 
Sam Greene 

SYSTEMS MANAGER 
Sara B, Phi lb in 

TYPESETTING/PAGINATION 
Bob Dukette, Linda Drew, Susan Allen 

GRAPHICS S EH VICES 

Richard Clarke. Manager. 

Sue 9 Ranagan, Dan C rote au. 

Deborah Smith 



Editorial Offices 

WGE Center 

Peterborough, NH 03459 1 194 

603-525-4201 



Wayne Green Enterprises Is a divtsion 
Of international Data Group. 

73 Amateur R*dte (ISSN 0745-O80X) 
w published monthly by WGE Publish- 
ing. Inc., a division of Wayne Green 
Enterprises. Inc, t WGE Center, Peter 
borough NH 03450-1194. Entire con- 
tents % 1987 by WGE Publishing, |nc 
No pan of this publication may be re 
produced without written permission 
from the publisher. 



o 




o 




< 



L 









\ 



April 24, 25, 26, 1987 



Early Reservation Information 



* General Chairman, Jim Simpson, WB8QZZ 



• Asst General Chairman, BUI McFiabb, WD83AY 



Grand banquet tickets are limited, please 
place your reservations early, 

• Giant 3 day flea market • Exhibits 

• Door prizes • License exams 

• CIV proficiency test 

Flea Market Tickets 

We increased Flea Market area by nearly 400 spaces 
this year and all were sold out by January 10, 

Special Awards 

nominations are requested for "Radio Amateur of the 
Year", 'Special Achievement' and "Technical 
Achievement" awards. Contact; Awards chairman. Box 
44. Dayton, OH 4540 1 ■ 

License Exam 

Novice thru extra exams scheduled Saturday & 
Sunday by appointment only. Send current FCC form 
610, copy of present license and check for $4.35 
(payable to ARRL/VEC) to: Exam Registration. 8830 
Windbluff Point, Dayton Oh 45459 



Slide 

35 mm slide/tape presentation about the 
HAMVEMTION is available for loan, Contact Dick 
Miller 2853 La Cresta, Beavercreek. OH 45324 

Parking 

Free parking is available at Hara Arena, In addition, 
there will be free shuttle bus service from all m^jor 
motels and designated parking lots. Parking and road 
information will be available on DARAs 146.34/.94 
repeater. 

Free Bus Service 

Free Bus Service will be provided between many 
Motels and Hara Arena. See the schedules at the 
motel registration desks. Avoid parking problems at 
the Arena by taking the HAMVEMTIOH buses. 



Campers St Trailers 

Campers and Trailers may be parked at Montgomery 
County Joint Vocational School. A HAMVENTIOtt bus 
will provide transportation between the camper 
parking area and the Arena. No campers or travel 
trailers will be permitted to park in the Arena lot or 
Flea Market area. 

Wheelchairs 

Wheelchairs will be available. Send S.A.S.E, for 
details to "Wheelchair" P.O. Box 44, Dayton, OH 
4540 1 . 

Alternate Activities 

HAMVENTIOM is for everyone. We have planned 
activities for the YL or your non-ham family 
members. 

Deadlines 

Award nominations: April 4 

Lodging: April 4 

License Exams: March 28 

Advance Registration and banquet: USA - April 1 1 

Canada - April 4 

Information 

General Information: (513) 433-7720 
orDARABox44 Dayton, OH 45401 
Flea Market Information; (513) 223-0923 
Lodging Information: {5 1 3) 223-26 1 2 
(No Reservations By Phone) 

This is the year for you to attend the internationally 
famous Dayton HAMVEMTIOM, Come with your 
friends to hear enlightening forums, see the latest 
equipment and visit a flea market that has 
everything! Ho matter what you are looking for you 
can find it in Dayton! 



HAMVENTIOH is sponsored by the 
Dayton Amateur Radio Association Inc. 



Advanced Multi-Torque 
Antenna Rotator 




The rotator frame 
can house up to 4 
motors to 

increase torque 
and load capac- 




Each motor is equipped with a Super Wedge and Clutch brake system (Sfip dutch 
type} that works independent^ from the main frame gear train and protects the rota- 
tor mechanism from excesswe lorqufi- 

Low voltage (24VAQ motors low-cost 6-wfre control cable., .can be Instated on 
the same base as a TEXEX unit 



8 



*. 




(x DAIWA 
f V\ Electronics Corporation 
-^ 1908A De! Amo Blvd. ■ Torrance, CA 90501 
DAIWA (213) 212-6057 ■ (213) 212-6058 

Specifications subject lo chgnoo wnnout notice ■ Ail models and types nof rapresented- 



League). Since I'm on the board of 
several corporations, including 
one projected to reach $1 billion in 
sales in a couple more years, I'm 
quite familiar with the responsibili- 
ties of directors. 

Boards of directors are normal- 
ly made up of experienced and 
successful business executives. 
They're experts in marketing, 
technology, financial manage- 
ment, and so on. And here's 
where I see the basic weakness of 
the League— a weakness that has 
kept the ARRL from providing our 
hobby (its business) with the tead- 
ership to keep it strong and 
healthy. 

When you gel your ballots to 
vote for your next director, what 
do you see on each one? You 
know what you see — a list of the 
ARRL appointments he's held. In 
many cases he's come up through 
the traffic system, so we know 
he's probably a true believer in 
Morse code for everyone. How 
many bios have you seen citing 
business experience— business 
success— including marketing, 
sales, financial, and other experi- 
ence which is fundamentally a 
part of a director's responsibility? 
We seem all too often to elect 
teachers* who haven't a clue as to 



how to run an $8 million business. 
A business*sawy ARRL board 
would, I'm convinced, have start- 
ed working years ago on getting 
school radio clubs going so we'd 
have the infrastructure to bring 
the League new customers. And 
they'd have kept current with cus- 
tomer needs through surveys- 
making the needed changes to 
keep the hobby growing— even in* 
eluding a no-code license. 




EW! 



PHONE REMOTE 



MODEL SOMA 



OPERATE YOUR 

HOME BASE STATION EVEN 

WHEN YOU'RE NOT AT HOME 








PHONE REMOTE is an interface between 
your home base station and your Nome tele- 
phone line. It allows operat*on of your home 
base station from any touch tone telephone 
using the touch tone pad to control PUSH* 
TOTALK. PHONE REMOTE works with any 
transceiver, HF, VHF or UHR ACTIVITY and 
PUSHTO-TALK timers are provided in case 
the telephone connection fs lost All opera 
r ion a I features are switch programmable 




W T Rl-H COMMUNICATIONS CORP 
P.O. Bo* 4075 
Winter Springs. FL 32708 
Telephone (305) 235B094 



In the ham field, the responsibil- 
ity comes right down to you. it's 
the unwrllingness of most hams to 
be involved with ham politics that 
has allowed so many hopelessly 
incompetent hams— good solid 
Morse men + to be sure — to be- 
come ARRL directors— the big- 
gest ego trip our hobby has to of- 
fer. Neither you nor your club has 
ever written to the candidates to 
find out if they have been success- 



'7 did the same as you with the last 
ballot— I looked over the candidates- 
noted their years of ARRL service and 

myriad of appointments— sighed, 
shrugged, and tossed a coin. " 



The boards of corporations that 
ignore the customers find their 
corporations under attack by 
raiders. Indeed, with virtually no 
exceptions, recent corporate 
raids have been brought on by 
boards of directors that have let 
their corporations weaken to the 
point where the directors should 
be replaced. 



ful in business— perhaps even 
with some experience as a direc- 
tor of other corporations. 

No, despite my tone of attack, 
I'm really not blaming you. But I 
will blame you if you let this situa- 
tion continue. No, I have to say flat 
out that it's my fault. I should have 
made this an issue long ago. Oh, 
yes, I did write about it a few years 



ago — but I didn't keep after you. 
And you're like me, if someone 
doesn'i hassle you. you forget, I 
did the same as you with the last 
ballot— I looked over the candi- 
dates—noted their years of ARRL 
service and myriad of appoint- 
ments—sighed, shrugged, and 
tossed a coin. 

The board elections are geared 
so there realty isn't time to get the 
business background (or lack of it) 
into print in 73 between the time 
we know who's running and the 
mailing of the ballots. One of 
these days we may gel amateur 
radio set up so we're able to actu- 
ally communicate in less than 
three months, but I hesitate to 
even guess when that'll be. 

Tell me, if you were an ARRL 
director, would you think it impor- 
tant to update the National Traffic 
System by about 50 years? 

If you agree and have some 
constructive ideas, I'd like to hear 
from you. If you disagree and can 
express your ideas in other than 
blind, emotional hate terms, 
please write. I've tried to get 
across my ideas on where we are 
and how to make things better — 
now I'd like your ideas. I reserve 

Continued on page 50 



12 73 Amateur Radio * April. 1987 





of the day! 

Have you been trawling the bounding main for a new product? We have just 
netted it — the TP-38 microprocessor controlled community repeater panel which 
provides the complete interface between the 
repeater receiver and transmitter Scuttle 
individual tone cards, all 38 EIA standard 

CTCSS tones are included as well as time and hit accumulators, programmable 
timers, tone translation, and AC power supply at one low price of $595.00. The 
TP-38 is packed like a can of sardines with features, as a matter of fact the only 
additional option is a DTMF module for $59,95. This module allows complete 
offsite remote control of all TP-38 functions, including adding new customers or 
deleting poor paying ones, over the repeater receiver channel. 

Other features include CMOS circuitry for low power consumption, non-volatile 
memory to retain programming if power loss occurs, immunity to falsing, pro- 
grammable security code and much more. The TP-38 is backed by our legendary 
1 year warranty and is shipped fresh daily. Why not set passage for the abundant waters 
of Communications Specialists and cast your nets for a TP-38 or other tine catch. 




$595.00 each 

$59.95 DTMF module 




COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS, INC. 

426 West Taf t Avenue * Orange, CA 92665-4296 
Local (714) 998-3021 - FAX (714) 974-3420 
Entire US. A. 1-000-854-0547 ^io 



'-M 'I' i irU 





ETTERS 



[ 



TICKET SALES 



For seven years I have had zero 
luck getting my wife interested in 
studying for her license. Febru- 
ary's Never Say Die regarding the 
selling of Extra-class licenses did 
the trick. There are a few modifi- 
cations we would like to see, how- 
ever. A regional center for license 
sales should be set up in each 
zone to give everyone equal ac- 
cess (Puerto Rico is just too far 
from 6-land). Mai! order would al- 
so be a good idea, but il might let 
in too many people and over- 
whelm the repeaters. An Extra- 
class license is just not neces- 
sary—a General for $50 would be 
adequate, In order to maintain the 
integrity of the traditional licens- 
es, a special prefix would be as- 
signed to purchased licenses. 
This would allow the real hams to 
ignore the new pseudo-hams if 
they want to talk about technical 
things such as the weather and 
their latest medical operation. 

John R. Fielder N6DAO 
Los Osos CA 

Ever since the news broke about 
licenses being sold, 73 has been 
deluged with calls and fetters from 
people begging us to tell them 
who to get in touch with in Puerto 
Rico or New York. We won't say. 
We don 't feel bad for those who 
can't be bothered with teaming 
code and theory, but when folks 
who have been earnestly trying to 
become hams for years cail t IVs 
tough to tell them to wait for "no- 
code/'— -Eds. 



NOVICE NEEDS 

I just got my Novice ticket and a 
subscription to 73. I guess I got 
taken in by the eclectic rambling 
of your magazine's salesman, 
Wayne, Now, please look over 
your table of contents and tell me 
what's in it for me. How about a 
Novice corner— basics about how 
an antenna tuner works, the differ- 
ence between a vertical and a 
dipole — vou get the point. Take a 
look ai other hobby mags. They 
realize that the newcomer to the 
craft must also be addressed. 

Morris Bleckman KA9WIA 

Lincolnwood IL 



Take a look at page 78, 73 's long 
search for a Novice columnist has 
finally ended. —Eds. 



PULL TOGETHER 

I believe every ham who hides 
his hobby and doesn't even try to 
train a new Novice every year 
should either shape up or turn in 
his license. When I pass my 
Novice exam some time in 1987, 
each year thereafter there will be 
a new Novice or student on his 
way to a license or you get to rip up 
my license. I may be a non-ham 
upstart to some, but either we all 
pull together or lose amateur ra- 
dio. Either live your creed or roll 
over and die. 

Keith Martin 

Lewiston ME 



late: He already was embarrassed 
in front of his friends. 

For the demo, we made up 
personal messages for the kids 
from Information we got from the 
school secretary beforehand, and 
Ken installed them on a local 
packet bulletin board. Then he 
allowed each kid to call up his 
own message! This went over re- 
ally big. 

Feedback has been positive 
from both kids and teachers. 
Check your local schools for simi* 
lar programs or consider champi- 
oning such a program yourself. 
The enthusiasm of the kids can be 
contagious. 

Ron Kyles KJ4NA 
sthton TN 



A super idea! — Eds. 



"NRATYPES ' I 



I did not appreciate KWICTs re- 
mark about "NRA types'* in the 
February Letters column. That is 
no different than calling all hams 



"A regional center for license 

sales should be set up In each zone to 

give everyone equal access. ff 



MORSE FOR MOPPETS 

Thought you'd be interested in 
the ham radio presentation Ken 
Fisher W9MJD and 1 made to 
eight kids at our local grammar 
school. We were part of the Gold 
Dust program of the West Side 
school, in which volunteers ex- 
pose first-to-fifth graders to music, 
arts, crafts, hobbles, etc. We pre- 
sented Morse code to the kids and 
taught them the first six letters— a T 
e, i, m, I, and n — and closed with a 
packet radio demonstration. I 
made up Certificates of Comple- 
tion on my computer (got the idea 
from "Future Hams of America" 
{73, July, 1986). and the kids were 
really impressed with them. Most 
picked up code quickly, and some 
very intelligent questions were 
asked, like "Why is shortwave 
called shortwave?" 

One mistake I made was not to 
notice that one tad was hard of 
hearing. The teacher noticed the 
special attention I was trying to 
give him and told me of his condi- 
tion. We obtained a hearing aid for 
htm which did help, but it was too 



'lids." Many hams are NRA mem- 
bers and I am sure they did not like 
your derogatory statement. 

KarlBurketKCTJU 
Payette ID 



"NRA TYPES" II 

Being a life member of the NRA, 
I object to the negative connota- 
tion that KW10 seems to give to 
the NRA and its members- If ama- 
teur radio had as effective an or- 
ganization as the NRA does work- 
ing on its behalf, ham radio 
wouldn't be in the mess that it's 
in I think that hams, and espe- 
cially the ARRL, could stand to 
take a few lessons from us ,k NRA 
types.'* 

John Aultman KA5UBL 
Hattiesburg MS 






4* 



NRA TYPES " III 



I was shocked after reading 
KWlO's reply to KH6GPI refer- 
ring to: "NRA types who haven't 
really thought much about what 



they're saying— they just mimic 
words that they have heard from 
other Activists.' " Perhaps KW10 
feit safe in unburdening himself in 
73 since the implication would be 
that NRA members are too stupid 
to pass a ham radio exam and 
consequently not read 73* This 
"NRA type" passed both ele- 
ments of the Extra-class exam 
100% correct at age 65. I will not 
lower myself to KW1 0's level and 
attempt to typecast him. He did it 
himself through the above-quoted 
sfur. 

Evert Skough N7HID 
Kingman AZ 

The Letters column of 73 is not an 
appropriate place for the expres- 
sion of non-ham*related personal 
opinions. 73 apologizes to those 
who were offended by the analo- 
gy,— Eds, 



SAY DIE 



] 



Your Never Say Die column is 
becoming very repetitive. Please 
spare us the time reading about 
how great you are. We all know 
how great you are. After all, you 
have been telling us how great 
you are in every column since you 
came back. Give the space to the 
Letters column— it is much more 
interesting, 

Arnold 0. Samuels KH6COY 
Ocean Shores WA 



NEVER SAY DIE 

Your editorials are completely 
outrageous. How do you get away 
with it? I have only one thing to 
say — welcome back! I'm a born- 
again subscriber since you've re- 
turned- I'd buy your magazine for 
the editorials alone— the rest is 
gravy. 

Jerome Prismantas NiHFC 

Organ NM 






COSMIC COMPARISONS 



] 



Concerning the story "Cosmic 
QRN" (February, 1987), W6HDM 
evidently thinks like Carl Sagan. 
Sagan's book Contact details the 
fictional story of the reception of 
our first extraterrestrial communi- 
cation. Parallels between the two 
stories include frequencies and 
multiple coding methods in a sin- 
gle signal. The two stories make 
great comparison pieces. 

Charlie Cotterman KA80QF 

Dayton OH 



14 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 




ANNOUNCING 



For Orders & Quotes 
CALL TOLL FREE 



1 -800-423-2604 

(U.S. and Hawaii) 



Nlon.-Fri, 9:00-7:00 Centra! Time 
Sat. 9:00-1:00 Central Time 



5^# 



riendly Servic 
Texas Style! 



Texas Residents Call 

(512) 454-2994 




ICOM 




ICOM 




ICOM 



03 



Iff MS 



O if do 







IC-R7000 




IC-745 




IC-02AT 

IC-04AT 

IC-2AT 

IC-3AT 

IC-4AT 




IC-28A 
IC-28H 



(C-751A 



IC-3200A 





i.Q.O. - 



$9 Ji * , — 


* — - — i 


X , X , « & £ • 


-c:b 



IC-735 



IC-R71A 



— 



KENWOOD 



KENWOOD 



KENWOOD 




TS-940S 



TR-2600A 
TR-3600A 



TR-751A 




TH-21AT 

TH-31AT 
TH-41AT 





TM-2530A 
TM-2550A 
TM-3530A 




R-2000 



TS-440S 





J£4 



Austin Amateur Radio Supply • 5325 N. IH 35 • Austin, Taxes 78723 • 512/454-2994 




"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio ■ April 1987 15 



For the Finest in Repeaters, 

Go with the Leader 



SPZC TRUm CQMMUWGA T tOHS 



>m* m a. ■ 



! 






»m.*# 



rrff* 



y 4 



# * 






CR1000A2Mor220 
REPEATER W/1 50 WT. < 
-POWER AMP. & 30A 
PWR SUPPLY. 
(All items available separately) 



Shown in optional cabinet. 






SPECTRUM 

We Ve got the greatest 
design/performance 
"Know-how"— 12+ years 
in the business — with 
constant improvements in 
our Repeaters & Link Units! 



Spectrum now makes 3 lines of VHF & UHF 
Repeaters— the world famous 'Super Deluxe' 
SCR1000A/4000A, the Low Cost line of 
SCR77s, and the State of the Art Microproces- 
sor Controlled SCR2000X Line of Repeaters! 
The SCR77 Repeaters maintain the quality of 
design, components and construction which 
have made Spectrum gear famous throughout 
the world for years, However, all of the "bells & 
whistles" 1 have been eliminated— at a targe 
cost savings to you! The SCR77 is a real 
"workhorse" basic machine designed for those 
who want excellent super-reliable perform- 
ance year after year— but no frills! 
Of course, if you do want a Full Featured/Super 
Deluxe Repeater with panel metering and 
controls, and a complete list of built-in' op- 
tions, then you want our SCR1000A, or the 
SCR2000X— The Ultimate in Repeaters. 
All three available with: Autopatch/Reverse 
Patch/Landline Control; TouchTone Control of 
various repeater functions: W; "Emergency 
PwrJtD"; Tone & Timer Units; Sharp RX Filters; 
Power Amps; etc. 



Complete Line of VHF/UHF Rcvr, & Xmtr. 
Boards & Assys. also available. Plus ID t 
COR, DTMF Control Bds., Antennas, 
Dupiexers, Cabinets, etc. Inquire, 



Call or write today for details and prices! Sold Factory Direct or through Export Sales Reps, only. 
Get your order in A.S.A.PJ 



SPECTRUM COMMUNICA TIONS CORP. 



51 



1055 W. Germantown Pk, S4 • Norristown, PA 19403 • (215) 631-1710 • TELEX: 846-211 

1 6 73 Amateur Radio • April , 1 987 





HEAVY STUFF 



Face it, the world 

of ham radio is a lot more complex than 
it used to be. We have new modes pop- 
ping up every day, satellites racing around 
the globe, computers, spread- spectrum . . . 
how can you keep up with it all? 



It's easy. Every month, 73 Magazine covers 
the whole spectrum of amateur radio with 
a light, easygoing style. We'll keep you up- 
to-date on what's happening in your hobby; 
you may even learn something new! 



Just $19.97 will bring you 12 issues of 73. A 
monthly trip to the newsstand would cost over 
$35. 

Find out what your friends already know : 

73 Magazine puts the fun back into ham radio. 



i □ 



You're right! Let's have some fun — sign me up for a 
year of 73 for only $19.97, a savings of over 43% off 
the cover price! (With your paid subscription, 
you'll also receive a giant DX Map of the World — a 
$5 value — absolutely free! 



"I 

I 

% 



Name 
Call_ 



Address 
City_ 



DAE 
Card# 



DMC 



State 

□VISA 



Zip^ 



□Check 



Exp. Date 



For immediate service, call toll-tree 1 -800- 7 22-7790. Offer valid in the U5 and possessions for a limited time only. 
Please allow 6 weeks for processing of first rfssue. 

Mail to: 73 Magazine, Circulation Dept., WGE Center, 70 Rte. 202N, Peterborough, Nfl 0345S-9995 



7746DK 




73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 17 




EW PR 



III 



UCTS 



YAESU FT-1Q9RH 
AND FL-7000 

Yaesu U.S.A. announces the 
FT-109RH. a 5-Watt T 220-MHz 
hand*held transceiver as a follow- 
up product to the FT-209RH and 
FT-709R hand-helds. Covering 
220 to 224.995 MHz in 5-kHz or 
10-kHz steps, it includes battery- 
saver. 1 memories, standard 1 .6- 
MHz Of nonstandard offset, and 
memory and priority scanning. It 
is equipped with a DTMF tone 
generator, front-panel multimeter 




Yaesu' s FT-1Q9RH 220< 
hand-held. 



indicating battery condition* 
transmitter power output, or re- 
ceived signal strength, and a VOX 
system. Optional accessories are 
interchangeable with other units 
in the 109, 209, and 709 series, 

Yaesu has also introduced the 
FL-7000 solid-stale linear amplifi- 
er for 160 through 15 meters. 
It features an automatic antenna 
tuner with automatic bandswitch- 
ing when used with a Yaesu 
FT-757GX, FT-767GX, or FT-980 
transceiver. Antenna switching 
also is automatic with the FAS- 
1-4R remote antenna selector. 
Power input is 1200 Watts for ap- 
proximately 70 Watts: a protec- 
tion circuit prohibits operation 
with high swr until the antenna 
tuner completes the matching 
process. Thermostatically con- 
trolled dual fans run even when 
the amplifier is turned off if they 
are still needed tor the dissipation 
of heat. 

Further information on these 
Yaesu products may be obtained 
by checking Reader Service num- 
ber 206. 

MERCER POCKET DMM 

Mercer Electronics is offering a 
new low-cost digital multimeter, 
the model 9345. A single rotary 
disk allows selection of the quanti- 
ty to be measured and provides 
automatic measurement on all 
functions. It measures volts and 
Ohms, has a high-contrast LCD 
display, and has audible continu- 
ity indications. It comes with carry- 
ing case and batteries for $34.95. 

For more information, please 
circle Reader Service number 
209. 




MFJ COMPACT SPEAKER 
AND NEW ANTENNAS 

MFJ Enterprises, fnc, is releas- 
ing its new compact mobile speak- 
er with magnetic base and tilt 
bracket, the MFJ*280. Equipped 
with a 3-1/2-mm phone plug on a 
long cord, it works well with all 8- 
and 4-Ohm impedances and can 
handle up to 3 Watts of audio. At 
£18.95, it is backed with a one* 
year unconditional warranty. 

MFJ is also offering three new 
antennas. The MFJ-1710 is a 3/8- 
wave. 2-meter, telescopic with 
BNC It comes with a pocket clip 
and is 5-3/4" collapsed and 
24-1/2" extended ($9 95). The 
MFJ- 171 2 is a 1/4-wave. 2*meter; 
5/8-wave, 440-MHz, telescopic 
with BNC that is 7*1/4" collapsed 
and 19" extended ($14,95). The 
MFJ- 171 4 is an end-fed, half- 
wave, 2-metef telescoping dipole. 

For additional information 
about these MFJ products, check 
Reader Service number 207. 



REGENCY INFORMANT 
AND TUBBO-SCAN 800 

Regency Electronics, Inc., has 
introduced the Informant and Tur- 
bo-Scan 800 scanners. The Infor- 
mant, preprogrammed with key 
state and local law enforcement 
frequencies for all 50 states, will 
search VHF and UHF police fre- 
quencies for any state with a sin- 
gle touch at four times the speed 
of most scanners. A weather- 
search function scans for the 
nearest National Weather Service 
frequency. The display shows 




Mercer s model 9345 pocket 
DMM. 







*i 



New antennas from MFJ. 




Yaesu's FL'7000 solid-state linear amplifier 
18 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



MFJ's compact mobile speaker 



state and type of transmission 
(state or county police); there is a 
highway/city switch for choice of 
monitoring local or statewide fre- 
quencies, and a hold switch to 
keep the receiver on a single fre- 
quency. The radio comes with a 
multi-position mounting bracket/ 
clip to fit any vehicle. It includes a 
telescoping antenna. Wiring can 
be direct to dc or through a 
cigarette lighter adapter. The sug- 
gested retail price is $369.95. 

The Turbo-Scan 800 "scans 
nearly five times faster than any 
competitive model" and provides 
wide coverage of 12 of the most 
popular 800-MHz public-service 
frequencies ft has a translucent, 
rubber keypad, bacfclit for night 
use, and dual-level vacuum-fluo- 



rescent display. Frequencies may 
be entered into any of the scan- 
ner's 75 channels or grouped into 
any of the six scan banks, Chan- 
nets may be retrieved instantly, 
without having to manually step 
through all other channels, This 
rig also has the weather-search 
function. Designed for home or 
mobile use. it has a suggested 
retail price ot $499.95 Model 
TS-2 comes with two telescoping 
antennas (for standard VHF and 
UHF as well as 800-MHz re- 
ception), ac power supply, dc 
power cord, and mobile mounting 
bracket. 

To obtain more information 
about these Regency scanners, 
circle Reader Service number 
208. 




The Regency informant public information radio. 



NEW CATALOGS AND BOOKS 




Contact East, Comprehen- 
sive product guide for 1987 
featuring a full tine of tools and 
instruments for electronic spe- 
cialists, engineers, techni- 
cians, involved in assembling, 
testing, and repairing Free, in- 
cluding one year of technical 
supplements. Circle Reader 
Service number 210. 



jeNseN 

rf)&7 W1WTFR CATALOG 




Jensen Toots, Inc. Catalog of 
service and maintenance kits, 
hard-to-find tools. VCR align- 
ment, communications adap- 
tor kits, AT&T handsets, digital 
test equipment, lighting/opti- 
cal aids, soldering stations, 
computer accessories, more- 
Free. Circle Reader Service 
number 21 1 . 

QSKY Publishing. A primer 
on data communication writ- 
ten for the beginner tevel: The 

Digital Novice, by Jim Grubbs K9El t with cartoonist Tad Barney, 
128 pages. Twelve chapters, on everything from Morse code to 
packet radio and future uses for digital communications. ($12.45 
pod.) For more information, circle Reader Service number 212, 

Howard W\ Sams & Company. Publications: Audio IC Op-Amp 
Applications , 3rd Ed., by Walter G. Jung; 336 pages. Completely 
revised: includes devices such as very-high-slew-rate and dy- 
namic-range FET-input units, and new applications circuitry, 
#22452, $17.95. 

First Book of Modem Electronics Fun Projects and also Second 
Book, , . , both by Art Satsberg, both designed for the electronics 
hobbyist to expand his knowledge through practical fun learning; 
20 hands-on projects m each, from the pages of Modern Electron* 
ics magazine, each is 256 pages. #22503 (#22504 for the second 
one), $12.95 each. 

Forrest Mims* Circuit Scrapbook 11, 272 pages. Some 70 projects 



from Modern Electronics* columns, the "Electronic Notebook. 11 
Transistor, MOSFET, analog, digital circuits, LEDs, laser diodes, 
optoelectronics^ sensors, assembly tips. #22552, $19.95. 
Radio Handbook, by William L Grr— 23rd Edition, 640 pages, 
hardbound. Completely revised. £22424, $29.95, 
Shortwave Radio Listening with the Experts, by Gerry L Dex- 
ter, 528 pages. Features 25 contributors who are short- 
wave listening researchers, pi- 
oneers, and specialists, as 
well as veteran listeners. 
022519,522.95- 
Sotid-State Projects You Can 
Build, by Rudolf F. Graf and 
George J, Whalen. 1 76 pages. 
Complete step-by-step con- 
struction procedures, illustrat- 
ed, with background theory, 
parts lists, tips on where to get 
hard-to-find components. 
Projects include: electronic 
dice, computing thermometer, 
proximity or touch alarm. TV 
remote-sound system, sing- 
along light controller. #22500, 

$10.95. 

Understanding Electricity and 
Electronics Principles, 256 pages; Understanding Electricity and 
Electronics Circuits, 328 pages, written by Training & Retraining, 

Inc., revised by David L Heis- 
erman. # 27061 (Principles) 
and #27062 (Circuits), each 
$14.95. 

Understanding IC Operational 
Amplifiers, 3rd Ed, by Roger 
Melen and Harry Garland, 224 
pages. New, expanded, and 

updated applications include 
material on computer-aided 
design techniques and IC op 
amps in microprocessors 
*224S4, $12.95. 

For more information about 
these Howard Sams Books, 
circle Reader Service number 
213. 





73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 19 




DJ2UT XP706 Multiband Beam 



b\ Jim God ran N1EJF 



More than 10 years ago, a German ama- 
teur named Walfried Sommer DJ2UT 
decided that there must be a way to overcome 
the trap losses induced when a yagi was tri- 
banded for to, 15, and 20 meters. He also 
wanted to develop the high gain [7 dB or more) 
and the excellent front-to-back ratio that can 
be achieved on a monoband antenna by close 
(0.1 A) element spacing on a multiband beam. 
This presented him with the monumental task 
of overcoming the very narrow bandwidth and 
extremely tow resistance (10 Ohms or less) of 
those closely spaced designs. After reviewing 
the work of Rucker, Buchanin. and others and 
after spending many years in development, 
Sommer refined his design to that which is 
available today. 

Design 

The operating principle ot the DJ2UT anten- 
na is quite remarkable, On 20 meters, the 
system is a full-size beam using 1 /2A elements 
without traps. The main difference between 
this system and others is that all elements are 
driven with a phasing tine. In effect, you have a 
4-element log cell that develops an impressive 
9 dB of gain and an excellent fronMO-back 
ratio. 

On 15 and 17 meters, the 20-meter ele- 
ments are about 5/8A long. This results in 
a high feedpoint impedance that must be 
reduced. Instead of using the LC traps 
commonly found on multiband antennas, 
Sommer uses the capacitance found in 
the phasing line* in conjunction with the 
three or four elements (depending on the 
model) clustered around the feedpoint- It is 
this combination of driven and parasitic ele- 
ments that lowers the system's impedance 
and provides more than 8 dB of gain on 15 
meters. 

On 10 and 12 meters, the 20-meter ele- 
ments are about 1A long and are fed by the 
phasing line as split 1/2A elements in a 
cotlinear fashion, Gain on 10 meters is more 
thanlOdB. 

On 30 and 40 meters, the system ignores alt 
but the longest elements. In this configura- 
tion, it can be considered a dipole with a trans- 
mission line attached. These elements are too 
short to be resonant on 30 or 40 meters and 
present a capacitive reactance that must be 
eliminated. On 30 meters, this is done with an 
LC match; on 40 meters, a coll and/or a coax- 
ial capacitor is used. 

It is extremely important to note that these 
networks are NOT connected in SERIES with 
the antenna and that they cancel only the 
"blind" reactive components. They ARE NOT 

20 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



Sommer GmbH 

Distributed by: 

H.J. TheilerCorp. 

PO Box 5369 

Spartanburg SC 29304 

Price class: Semi -assembled $778 

Unassembled $662 






s 







- 




Photo A. The DJ2UTXP706 multiband beam. 

traps. There is some gain on 30 and 40 meters 
as compared to a conventional 1/2A dipole. 
Because the bandwidth is narrow on 40 me- 
ters, the resonant frequency can be easily 
adjusted. 

All the gain frgures presented lor this anten- 
na are as compared to a 1/2A dipole, NOT to 
some mythical reference (the figures present- 
ed are the manufacturer's claim, but my expe- 
rience is that his claims are conservative). 
Sommer goes to some effort to test the perfor- 
mance of his antennas. The figures become 
reatly impressive when you consider that this 
kind of performance is accomplished on a 20' 
boom! 

Antenna Assembly 

Construction of an antenna system this 
complex requires some effort. Having said 
this, I'm pleased to report that I experi- 
enced no real problems putting this antenna 
together. 

When this series of antennas was intro- 
duced to the U,S. T the instruction package left 
something to be desired. Pete Theiler has 
spent considerable time translating and 
rewriting the instructions. While some im- 
provement can and will be made, I think Pete 
has done a terrific job. 

My antenna arrived on a Thursday. I spent 
the first day reading through the instructions, 
and began construction on Friday evening. 
Fortunately, I was able to assemble most of 
the antenna (element holders, phasing line, 
etc) in my basement, as 1 was working just 
after a 1-1/2' snowfall I concluded the inside 
phase on Saturday, and on Sunday I verified 
all measurements and the lightness of all 
connections, 

Putting the elements on the antenna was 
very straightforward. Each element is color- 
coded and the measurements on the chart are 
easy to follow, although they are metric This 
wasn't a problem for me, but, if you're worried 
about cm, mm, and stuff like that, the consid- 




TT 



-^ET 






^i 





5 

X 



-r-j-rr 



o *1- 



5h 



**- 



~ 




Fig. f« The Sommer muHibander's active ele- 
ments are shown as bold; the inactive ele- 
ments are shown as a broken line. From the 
top down, these configurations are for: 20 
meters; 15/17 meters; 10/12 meters; 30/40 
meters. 

erate folks at Sommer even include a metnc 
ruler for your convenience 

The nuts and bolts are also metric, so a 
metric wrench is also supplied with the anten- 
na. While it is possible to assemble the anten- 
na using only this wrench and common hand 
tools, I found that my collection of metric tools 
was most helpful 

As I was assembling this antenna, the one 
thing that became clearer and clearer was the 
quality of the materials and engineering. The 
wall thickness of the element tubing is greater 
than that on U.S. -made beams that I've exam- 
ined. The element holder castings are mas- 
sive, weighing several pounds each, Every 
piece of this antenna is first-rate and designed 
to last a lifetime. All connecting pieces, U- 
bolts, nuts, and bolts are stainless steel 

I installed the antenna on a Glen Martin 
Engineering tower and Hazer unit. (If you're 



not familiar with the Hazer. please see my 

review below.) The rotor and thrust bearing 
mount on the Hazer unit, which travels up and 
down the tower. By bringing the Hazer to its 
lowest position (about 2' above the ground), 
you can mount the antenna at a very con- 
venient height, It's possible to attach or work 
on the antenna by using only stepladders 
With a beam of this size, that was a distinct 
advantage. 

Performance 

In use, this antenna performs better than I 
expected. My first contact was with a station in 
California, f was running only 100 Watts, but 
my signal was three S-unfts better than his 
and he was running a kW into a conventional 



beam. Regardless of distance, single hop or 
long path, my signal was one to three S-units 
better with 100 Watts than stations running 
linears into conventional antennas. 

The antenna is absolutely fiat across 20 me- 
ters, and on all other bands the swr is below 
1.7:1, While not very broadbanded on 40 me- 
ters, the antenna's performance is quite good. 
Pete tells me that a modification will soon be 
out that will make the bandwidth broader, and 
Vm looking forward to trying it out 

Conclusion 

This beam performs as well as mono- 
banders. White its cost may at first seem 
high, It is actually very reasonable when com- 
pared with what you would have to spend to 



get comparable performance with other an- 
tennas. It makes a good investment when 
you make the transition from wire antennas, 
as this antenna will provide gain on receive 
(while a linear works only one way). Don't 
think I'm knocking linear amplifiers; Vm not, 
It's just that if you optimize your antennas, any 
subsequent increase in output power works 
better. 

If you're serious about DX, appreciate quali- 
ty, or want an antenna that you can leave to 
your children, you should give serious consid- 
eration to this system. Quality is never cheap, 
but the value represented by your investment 
witl remain through the years, if you would like 
more information on this antenna, please cir- 
cle Reader Service number 204. ■ 



Glen Martin Ml 85 A Tower 

by Jim Godron NJEJF 



Glen Martin Engineering 

PO Box 7253 

Boonville MO 65233 

Price class; $1 T 275 



It's not every day that a ham gets to install a 
new tower. And when he does* it's usually a 
difficult project and just plain hard work. When 
I was presented with the opportunity to sel up 
and review a 40 J Glen Martin Engineering tow- 
er complete with Hazer unit. I decided to make 
the job as easy as possible- In my book, that 
means planning everything so that there are 
no surprises. 

The tower I installed was a 40-foot M 1 B5A It 
has an 18" face, is triangular, and is of bolted 
aluminum construction. Besides being very 
strong, the tower is also very light: the ship- 
ping weight of the complete tower and Hazer 
unit Is only 140 lbs. 

Choosing the Site 

The first step in a major project like this is 
planning the foundation. Because this tower is 
free-standing, it requires quite a substantial 
foundation— a finished size of 40" x 40" x 6'. 
This represents about 2.5 cubic yards of con- 
crete, far more than could be mixed by hand 
and more than most people would want to mix 
on site. 

Therefore, you should be able to get a 
cement truck within 10-16 feet of the loca- 
tion. If you cannot, the choices are to move 
the site or to bring the cement to the site in 
wheelbarrows. By the way, moving cement in 
wheelbarrows is NOT FUN and it takes a 
LONG time. 

I chose the area directly behind the garage 
for my tower, mostly because that's where my 
wife said I could put it. Our garage is connect- 
ed to the house by an enclosed breezeway. 
With the use of two cement chutes, we could 
pour cement through the breezeway and into 
the form. 

Preparing the Site 

Now that the site was chosen^ the next 
step was to dig a hole. I briefly considered 
using a shovel but reason prevailed and I 
decided to use a backhoe- But. due to a ma- 



jor sewer construction project in our small 
town, there was onfy one available at noon 
on an especially rainy day. When the opera- 
tor had dug a hole about 6 r wide by 10' long 
by 6 deep, he got the machine stuck in the 
backyard. It is incredible what carnage a 
large machine like that can cause to a newly 
seeded lawn. 

A structure this large should really be 
poured into a form. It's not absolutely nec- 
essary, but in the long run it's easier. If you're 
not an experienced woodworker, you should 
plan to spend about eight hours building 
the form. 

I constructed two stud walls 6 r tail and 
40" wide, and covered with 1/2" CDX ply* 
wood. I then cut another two pieces of 1/2* 
CDX 4x6' and "banded" these together in 
five places (see Photo A). I assembled the four 
pieces of the form in the hole and connected 
each joint with nails and screws. It is also a 
good idea to screw the overlapping plywood to 
the stud walls, After you pour the concrete, 
you may elect to strip the form or simply back- 
fill around it. 

The pouring of the concrete was almost an- 
ticlimactic. We pounded a ground rod into the 
undisturbed ground under the bottom of the 
form and connected it to the steel base sup- 
port. The base was held above the form with a 
two-by-four and a piece of furring so that the 
bolts would stick out of the concrete the prop- 
er distance. 

You will notice in Photo B that I didn't com- 
pletely backfill around the form. This allowed 
me to strip only the top of the form. I had 
ordered 2.5 cubic yards of 3,000-lb. concrete 
and had virtually none left over. After the con- 
crete set* I removed the base assembly, 
stripped the top of the form, and applied sili- 
cone grease to the bolts to keep them from 
rusting. 

The Hazer Unit 

The Hazer unit itself appears to have quite a 




Photo A. The form "banded" together. 




Photo 8, The area around the form i$ partially 
backfilled after the concrete has been poured. 

few parts, but assembly took only about two 
hours. The completed unit stands 4' tall with 
the thrust bearing mounted on the top plate 
and the rotor mounting plate on the bottom. 
When the unit slides up and down the tower, it 
rides on nylon studs. There are two studs at 
each corner (a total of 12) and extras are 
provided. 

In Photo C, you will notice the safety mech- 
anism. The arm must be held away from 

73 Amateur Radio » April, 1987 21 




Photo C, Cio$e»up of the Hazer unit, showing 
the safety mechanism. 

the tower while you are lowering the an- 
tenna or the Hazer will stop at the next 
crossbar. The spring that holds the safety bar 
up is stainless steel. The safety action of this 
device is "deadman"; if you let go of every- 
thing, the downward motion of the antenna 
stops. 

From Photo D, you will notice that there 
is a lug with a hole mounted in each corner 
On taller towers, you can attach the top 
set of guys to these lugs, or you could use 
them to hold one end or the middle of a 
wire antenna. 1 brought my coax and rotor 
cable to the bottom right lug and then ran the 
coax up past the thrust bearing and attached it 
to the lugs on the right side and upper right 
corner. 

The stainless-steel winch cable passes 
through the bottom and top plates and then 
over a pulley mounted at the top of the tower. 
The cable then goes down the inside of the 
tower and connects to the winch. The center- 
line of the mast and rotor pass off the side of 
the tower; this way. the antenna boom will 
miss the tower and the entire platform can 
travel up and down the tower. 

The antenna must be pointed in one cer- 
tain direction as it's raised or lowered. As a 
matter of convenience. I aligned the tower so 
that this position would be north. It doesn't 
make any difference what direction you use. 
but t think it's easier to use north, south, east, 
or west. 

One thing to consider when using a system 
like this is that because it's so easy to move 
the antenna up and down, you're probably 
going to move it frequently. Because the coax 
isn't connected to the lower, it needs to be 
strong and flexible. 

I discussed these problems with Joel 
Knoblock of The RF Connection and he made 




Photo D. The Hazer unit, 

what I think were the perfect suggestions. We 
ran International 9086 from the shack to the 
base of the tower and terminated it with an 
in-line N splice to International 9095 (called 
Ultra-Flex), which is a 50-Ohm cable with a 
.405" o-d. (the same as RG-S). 

The center conductor is 1 1 gauge (made up 
of 24 strands of 19*gauge copper wire). The 
shield is 98% and made of copper. The result 
is a very strong cable that stays flexible to 
temperatures near 0° F. It is rated to 1 P 500 
Watts and costs only pennies a foot more than 
RG-8. The International company is located in 
Arlington Heights, Illinois. More information 
can be obtained from The RF Connection (21 3 
North Frederick Avenue #1 1 , Gaithersburg 
MD 20877; 301-840-5477). 

The Tower 

The tower itself consists of 10-foot sec- 
tions made up of angled legs and tubular 
cross braces. The braces are bolted to the 
legs with stainless-steel carriage bolts and 
self-locking nuts. The tower sections are at- 
tached with a plate bolted to the inside of the 
leg. By using this method of joining the sec- 
tions, you will not disturb the centerline of the 
leg. If the tower is damaged, the bad area can 
be cut out and the tower reconnected any- 
where along its length. The legs are punched 
with square holes to catch the carriage bolts, 
and the tubular braces have their ends flat- 
tened and drilled. 

So that I could fully experience the varia- 
tions in construction, the factory shipped me 
two assembled and two unassembled sec- 
lions. The only tool required is a nut driver or 
wrench to tighten the nuts. To make things 
easier, I put the nutdriver bit in my variable* 
speed drill. 

It took me about 1-1/2 hours to assem- 
ble one of the sections, an hour to assem- 
ble the other. I found that the punched 
holes and drillings were extremely accurate 
and I had no trouble with the assembly. You 
can order sections assembled at the factory 




Photo E. The Glen Martin Engineering M1B5A 
tower with antenna attached. 



for an additional $25. If you're short on time, 
spend the extra money: if not, I think you'll 
enjoy the experience of putting the sections 
together. One thing that I hadn't thought 
about before my tower was delivered is that 
because aluminum is so light, the freight 
charges are much less than those of steel 
towers. 

The bottom section of the lower bolts to 
a hinged assembly, which in turn attaches 
to the three studs protruding from the con- 
crete foundation. The hinged plate sits on 
nuts so that leveling can be easily accom- 
plished. When the plate is level, lockwashers 
and nuts go on top. I set the first section and 
made sure the whole thing was tevel and 
plumb. Then I hinged it over and attached the 
other sections. 

With the complete tower lying on the 
ground, I positioned the Hazer unit on the 
middte of the top section and attached a 
rope to the Hazer to help lift the tower. My kind 
XYL. Donna, our two children, and I lifted 
the tower. We got the tower as high as we 
could (about 45 degrees) and supported it with 
a ladder. We lifted it the rest of the way by 
using the rope and the car, All in all, the whole 
thing went very smoothly and took only an 
hour or so. 

After the tower was up and secure, it was a 
simple matter to lower the Hazer and discon- 
nect the rope. The Hazer comes drilled for 
Kenpro rotors, and my Kenpro KFU2000 fit 
exactly. If you need the unit drilled for another 



22 73 Amateur Radio * ApriU987 



type of rotor, all you have to do is let the factory 
know. 

If you've ever had to install a large beam on 
a tower of any height, you II be amazed how 
easy it is to do with the Hazer. You simply 
lower the Hazer, and then two people can 
attach the LARGEST antenna by using only 
stepladders. My 20-year-old daughter, An- 
drea, and I installed a SommerXP706 (which 
weighs 110 lbs., and its longest element is 32 
feet) by ourselves in only two hours! 

Conclusion 

In use, the tower and Hazer unit work ex- 
tremely well. At 40' . the tower is free-standing 
even with an antenna as large as the XP706, 
During a recent severe winter storm, I became 
concerned because winds were forecast to be 
quite strong, I simply lowered the antenna and 
didn't give it another thought all night, 

I must admit that before this experience I 
was a dyed-in-t he-wool steel-tower user. How- 
ever, the many advantages in maintenance, 
ease of erection, and strength vs, weight have 
convinced me that aluminum lowers deserve 
serious consideration. 

Even if you have a steel tower, you can stifi 
enjoy the freedom from climbing that the 
Hazer offers. There are models available for 
Rohn towers. For the ham who can't or 
doesn't Ifke to climb, the Hazer provides a way 
to perform the annual maintenance that your 
beam deserves. Circle Reader Service num- 
ber 205 lo receive additional information 
about this tower. ■ 




DELTA 
LOOP 



NTENNAS 



* Delta design, full wave DX 
performance on your favorite band 

* High Quality construction using 
6061 T6 Aluminum and Stainless 
Steel hardware 

* Excellent Gain, FB Ratio and SWR 

* Designed to survive adverse weather 

* Easy assem bly - fixed or portable 

* Mounts alone or above your yagt 

* 2 and 3 element monoband models 

* 10- 12 -15* 20 meter bands 

* Phone or write for details on our n Big 
Horn" series of antennas 



Delta Loop Antennas "* 27b 
44 Old State Road, Unit *18 
New M Word, CT 06776 
(BOO) 223-371 8 (203) 355-371 8 

Dealer inquiries Invited 





CONTROL 
YOUR SHACK 
FROM VOiiR 
MOBILE /NT 



Super ComShock 64 

Repeater Controller/Dual Remote/Rutopatch 




instant code 
practice mode 

controlled from 
your H T 



Turn off the 
repeater & change 
all access codes 
from an NT or 
any telephone! 




Super Repeater Controller 

*ftemote1y program able with Touchtones/ change up 
to 9 sets of access codes from H T, or telephone* 
♦Synthesized speech consisting of high quality 
male or female digitized human voice 
*Dual Remote base {H.F. & V.H.F.) 
*Autopatch S* Super Repeater Controller 
•Program voice ID tat 1 message from your M T 
♦Automatic voice clock & activity timers 
♦Multiple commands can be executed at once 

(up to T6 digits per command string) 
*Suti- audible tone& speed dial compatible 
♦Alarm clock & auto-escute command string! 
•Optional autoboot cartridge ( no disk dr ive needed) 
•Send system commends from telephone line! 
Special Club Features 

•Generates random code practice ^ any speed with 

voice readback after each 20 random code group! 
♦Set CW speed & pitch from your H.J. 
♦Input up io 22 vccab words & letters as ID x 

mat I box message # speed dial rates from H f 
•Enable/disable up to 50, tel *'s ♦ wildcards 

Autopatch Specifications 
*3QG Touch lone loadable Autodial numbers 

plus 10 Emergency Autodial (quick access) 
*300 Reverse patch call signs uploaded from 

your HT /general or directed page modes 
* incoming caller receives voice message to enter 3 

digit code to selective page a call sign (D.P mode) 
*Phone number memory readback 
•Enable/disable 50 area codes + wild card **s 
•Full or half duplex (repeater on/off) 
•Storage of MCI /Sprint access codes 
•Call waiting allows switching to second phone line 
•Touchiones are regenerated onto the tel /speed dial 
•Touchtone or dial pulse modes 
•Reverse patch active in all modes 



Dual Rem ote Base Specifications 

• H.F, remote supports; Yaesu FT- 757/767/960 

Kenwood TS-440/940, loom IC-735 
•2nd remote control data supports; Yaesu FT-727 
FT- 767 & Kenwood 71 !/d1 I -or the- 7950 or 
TS- 2530/70 wltn RAP l (control card ) 
*10 H.F. Memory channels /enter or recall 
•Automatic U56/158/FM/AJ1 mode select 
"Scan up/down , fast , or l OOhz steps 
•Control CS-8 relay/ letch /master reset /Status 
*H,F./Y.H.F. Monitor only or TX enable modes 
•All control inputs are voice confirmed including 

frequency, mode, scan status, time, outputs on/off 
*VHF remote, as link Input, & repeater can be active 

System Options 

•e Latcning Relay control (CS-8) % 79.95 
+ 3 OPDT 2A relays, 5 open collector outputs 
+ user defined 2 letter function name & state 
+ automatic PTT fan control/ master all off code 
•Optional CMOS auto-boot 72k EPROM Cartridge 
proyammea with your parameters $99.95 
•Keypad Control for VHF remote, RAP 1 $ 1 49. 9S 
"Super Com Shack Manual ( credit later) Si 5.00 

( MODEL CS64S-$349» 95 (wired and tested)) 

includes: computer interface, disk . cables & manual . 
duplex & simplex versions are supplied 
(some features not applicable when using simplex ) 
(add $4 00 shipping / Ca. residents add 6%) 

MASTTRCARD/VISA/CHECK/rLO /COP 

Engineering Consulting 

583 Candlewood St. 

Brea, Ca. 9262 I 
tel: 714-671-2009 



Audio Blaster Module IO02AT/IO04AT/IC2AT 

Module installs Inside the radio In 15 Mm Boost audio to 
1 wattl Low standby drain/Corrects low audio/ 1 0OP's o f 
happy users (Works in otner H.T's too) ^hh4 D 
Used by Police /ire, Emergency, when ft needs to be loud! 

AUDIO BLASTER* 




WoW! thals loud'" 
What ■ dlff«r«ncc 
Now i can hear It ! 



Model AB 1 - J 1 9,95 



Touch tone 4 D1gtt 
Decoder & on/or f latch 
50.000 combinations 




AUDIO 

Touehtona to RS-252 (300 baud Interface) 

Program your computer in baste to decode multtdiglt "strings", 
sound alarms, observe codes , Simple to install; + 12 VDC 

/audio; includes basic program for C64 /¥1C20/Ct28;all 

computers' OECODEA-PAD" | Model DAP 109 95 



RAP- 1 



Radio under control 





Repeater on/off Maste r control 



Wire! and tested +5 to + 12 Volts/ 
User programs*] le to 50,000 codes/ 
All 1 6 digits/Send code once to turn 
on , again to turn off/ Momentary & 
Latching output/drives relay /LEO 
letch indicator /Optional 4 digit extra 
custom latch iC's $8 95 each/add as 
many latches as you wont to your 
external board i Model T5D $59*95 



Remote Keypad Rows & Columns Controller Plus Two 4 digit 
d e c oders ( on/off )/Wi11 control frequency of any keypad entry 
radio such as the Kenwood 7950/2530/ 1004-AT Easy to install 
in parallely with existing keypad/Use witft ComSheck 64 as a 
freq. controller or with Pro Search rotor control box/A versatile 
board for ell remote control applications, The latches may be 
used for on /off or momentary, 

■REnOTE-A-PAD' 



:el RAP-1 $149 95 




Touch tone 
Dacodor Kit 

M957 Teltone 
Stot2v. ISima 
(551-201 eompatable)/ine r 3,58 
Mhz Crystal/ 22 pin socket, Date 
Sheet, Sample circuits, decoder 
specs, all 1 6 touchtones, BCD/HEX 



No filters req nod«i TTK $22.95 



73 Amateur Radio • ApriU987 23 



Kenwood TS-711A 144-MHz Multimode Transceiver 



by Peter H. Put man KT2B 

Trio-Kenwood Communications 
1 1 1 1 West Walnut Street 
Compton CA 90220 
Price class: $900 




For those readers who've been wondering 
if they perhaps missed a product review 
of the Kenwood TS-711A 2-meter multimode 
transceiver in some past issue of 73 , . . relax. 
You didn't miss it- The TS-71 1 A has been on 
the market for a few years, but somehow got 
overlooked in the accumulation of items that 
are selected for review each year by the 73 
staff. Why t we even managed to take a look at 
the companion 70-cm unit, the TS-81 1 A r last 
June! Finally, at long last, a TS-71 1 A showed 
up at the offices of WGE a few weeks ago, 
courtesy of Kenwood, so I seized the opportu- 
nity to put it through its paces. 

The TS-71 1 A comes in a package about the 
size of Kenwood's popular TS-430/440 series 
HF transceivers, ostensibly to create a 
matched layout along with the TS-81 1 A for a 
complete HF/VHF/UHF station. The final is 
rated at 25 Watts output (adjustable), and 
band coverage is from 142-148 MHz to allow 
MARS and CAP operations. The usual bells 
and whistles are included, such as pro- 
grammable memories and scanning, as well 
as some useful controls such as i-f shift 
and RIT. 

If you read the TS-81 1 A write-up, you'll no- 
tice a close resemblance to the TS-71 1 A in 
layout, performance, and size. Both radios are 
equipped with Kenwood's Digital Code 
Squelch (DCS) system, which I did not get a 
chance to tinker with. This system will not 
permit the squelch to open on any signal un- 
less the proper "code" is present, functioning 
in the same manner as Private Line™ (PL), but 



on a more sophisticated level, in addition, the 
system can be set up to locale an unused 
channel and then send another TS-71 1 A 
equipped with the correct code to that chan- 
nel—automatically. 

The modes of operation included are CW, 
USB, LSB, and FM, which are switch-se- 
lectable from the front panel. An audible CW 
character signals when the desired mode is 
selected. Also present is a button marked au- 
to, which preselects the mode according to a 
band plan. You may recall that I found this 
control somewhat useless on the TS-81 1 A 
due to the different 70-cm band plan em- 
ployed in Japan. However, the Japanese 2m 
band plan is very similiar to that of the U.S. t 
with CW switched in from 144.000-1 44.099 
MHz. USB from 144.100-144 499 MHz, FM 
from 144.500-145.799 MHz, USB from 
145.800-145.999 MHz, and FM again for the 
remainder of the band. 

The rest of the left side controls are al for 
priority channel function; scan.m in for loading 
memories; lock and rev, which lock the main 
dial and select reverse of any offset present, 
respectively: and chs, which scans memory 
channels. Tone frequencies for PL can be se* 
lected from a switch and the front tuning dial 
A 20-dB attenuator is provided for strong sig- 
nals, and a speech processor (nonadjustable) 
can also be switched in. In addition to the i-f 
shift and RIT functions, the right side includes 
controls for squelch, microphone gain, rf pow- 
er out t af/rf gain, 1-MHz up/down, and noise 
blanker (nonadjustable). 



Specification 


Measured 


Claimed 


Minimum Discernible Signal 


Less than - 140 dBm 


M/A 


Sensitivity (SSB). 1MB S/N 


.20 uV 


Less than ,16uV 


Sensitivity (FM). TO-dBS/N 


MxN 


Less than ,22 uV 


Selectivity, SSB 






-6dB 


Greater than 3 kHz 


Greater than 2.2 kHz 


-60 dB 


Less than 7 kHz 


Less than 4.8 kHz 


Selectivity, FM 






-6dB 


Greater than 5 kHz 


Greater than 12 kHz 


-60 dB 


Less than 20 kHz 


Less than 24 kHz 


Conversion Gain 






(Rf Amp/Mixer) 


19dB 


WA 


1-dB Compression 


-1 dB 


WA 


Dynamic Range, dBm 


122 dBm 


N/A 


Transmitted Power 






Output @ 50 Ohms 


26 Watts 


25 Watts 


Low Power Output 


2.7 Watts 


2 Watts 


Frequency Accuracy 


1 46.0002 meas. 


1 46.0000 disp. 



Table 1. Performance data— TS-71 1 A. 
24 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



The TS-71 1 A is equipped with two vfo's 
and a memory bank that can hold up to 40 
memories with offsets, subtones, and mode 
for each channel. Main dial tuning occurs in a 
range of steps, depending on mode. For ex- 
ample, in FM mode you can either select 10- 
Hz or 5-kHz steps, while in SSB or CW the 
choice is— surprise!— 10 Hz or 5 kHz. The 
difference is the button marked ch q. When it 
is engaged, you'll hear a loud ""kerchunk" as 
a solenoid kicks in and the tuning knob ^click- 
steps" in S-kHz increments, very useful on 
FM. When it isn't engaged, the tuning is siJky 
smooth. And if 10 Hz isn't fast enough, en- 
gage the step button and cruise along at 100 
kHz per revolution. 

As noted before, microphone gain is ad- 
justable from the front panel. Following past 
Kenwood practice, this applies only in SSB 
mode, Mike gain is preset on FM and is ad- 
justable only by removing the cover. On oth- 
er multimode transceivers, such as the IC- 
275A reviewed last month, the mike gain 
works in every mode, which I find handy when 
accessing repeaters with different audio fre- 
quency response curves. You know the 
types — everyone says your audio is too hot, or 
too low, etc. 

The proc (processor) control is of question- 
able value on 144 MHz. and I could do without 
it, especially since the level of compression is 
not adjustable. On the other hand, HIT is very 
useful as I have pointed out in the past, espe- 
cially when you're trying to copy weak CW 
signals through the noise. And the i-f shift 
pulls its weight during contests! its function is 
very similar to a passband tuning control 
shifting the passband of the i-f filter to either 
side of the desired signal. 

Let's now take a look at the schematic. The 
front end employs a 3SK 129 GaAsFET driving 
a 3SK122 MOSFET mixer, and the combina- 
tion works reasonably well, as the perform- 
ance data in Table 1 shows, Selectivity is 
accomplished by the use of two helical prese- 
lectors — a two-pole unit ahead of the GaAs- 
FET and a three-pole unit following. This 
scheme does improve selectivity as shown in 
the performance data and is the right way to 
go at VHF and UHF frequencies, especially 
with broadbanded rf receive amplifier stages 
On transmit, an M57727 power module is em- 
ployed with both temperature and swr protec- 
tion. ALC control is also afforded, and the ALC 
level can be displayed via the front-panel 
meter. 

The TS-71 1 A has its own self-contained 
power supply, and it gets fairfy warm with use 
but never hot. A cooling fan will engage after 
lengthy transmissions— usually on FM— and 
disengage when the temperature drops below 
a certain point- Provision has been made to 
connect an external supply if you wish to go 
portable. Other connections can be made for 
your CW key, headphones, external speaker, 
and an external standby switch — presumably 
for a footswitch when in CWmode. There is no 
front-panel TX/RX switch; I find this a bit of a 
nuisance, especially when doing performance 
tests or tuning up amplifiers. 

Kenwood has provided one accessory jack 
for interfacing with RTTY for AFSK operation 



(ACC1), and the connections are quite clearly 
spelled out in the manual. Kenwood also iden- 
tifies an ACC2 jack in the owner's manual 
which is intended for a computer interface. 
However, the knockout on my unit where 
ACC2 would go was filled by a plastic insert, 
leading me to conclude that you must buy the 
optional interface to obtain and use this con- 
nection. Either that, or the interface isn't avail- 
able yet in the US. (A third possibility is that 
this particular unit just didn't have the jack 
installed!) 

In actual use, the TS-71 1 A is quite easy to 
figure out after you remove it from the box. 
The human engineering is quite good, al- 
though some of the less frequently used bells 
and whistles could have been pushed off to 
the side. As in all Kenwood transceivers, pro- 
vision has been made for dial torque adjust- 
ment t but the factory setting was comfortable 
from the start, 

I used the T3-711A with my Microwave 
Modules MML-2203 power amplifier and a 
Cushcraft 32-19 Boomer, and righi away no- 
ticed one BIG problem: no external amplifier 
keying jack. ICOM has been offering these for 
years on their 2-meter multi modes — so. how 
about it, Kenwood? I personally can't abide by 
rf VOX keying and prefer a hard-switched 
setup, It was no problem switching the Ken- 
wood into transmit through its standby termi- 
nal, but I had to use an external sequencer to 
key both devices. 

Receiver sensitivity is adequate, although 
not on par with many state-of-the-art transvert- 



ers and the aforementioned IC-275A. On more 
than one occasion, I had to switch in an exter- 
nal GaAsFET preamp to pull out a weak SSB 
signal, especially during rapid fading. An out- 
board preamp would probably be a good idea 
for very-weak-signal work, but J couldn't rec- 
ommend anything with more than about 10- 
12 dB of gain. A preamp exceeding that num- 
ber will cause the 711A's front end to crunch 
up on strong signals (as wiil be shown in the 
test results). 

Selectivity is very good, and I can't imagine 
too many situations on SSB/CW where you 
won't be able to pull out some signal from the 
QRM by using the RIT and i-f shift controls. 
Incidentally, there are no filter options for the 
TS-71 1 A— what you buy is what you get. It 
would have been nice to have some sort of CW 
filter option at least. 

Received audio reports were good, al- 
though I noticed a similarity with the TS-430S 
series HF radios 1 and that was that most oper- 
ators preferred the audio of the MC-42 hand- 
held microphone over the MC-50/MO60 
base-station mikes. Reports ranged from "too 
much bass" to "mushy sounding." The MC- 
42 was clearly the winner here. 

I really wish Kenwood would supply a micro- 
phone with their transceivers. Can you imag- 
ine how someone feels when they rip into the 
box, pull out a brand new TS-71 1 A, and dis- 
cover there's no microphone included? For 
Pete's sake, mark up the price a few dollars if 
you have to, but at least include the hand-held 
microphone! 



Performance Review 

Now take a look at Table 1 . The receiver in 
the TS-71 1 A got a pretty thorough going-over, 
as I was iooking for dynamic range, compres- 
sion data, and MDS. The transmitter was 
checked for power output, output adjustment, 
and displayed frequency versus measured 
frequency. The figures are about what I ex- 
pected, and the 1 -dB compression point of - 1 
dBm is about average for a GaAsFET. 

Using an external preamp with the TS-71 1 A 
might result in 1MD products and spurious 
signals when strong local signals are pres- 
ent, making it very difficult to work weaker 
signals on nearby frequencies. The dynamic 
range is acceptable, again considering the 
use of a GaAsFET in the front end, Selectiv- 
ity is fairly good. The output power level is 
sufficient to drive all of the 2-meter ampli- 
fiers currently on (he market, and the low- 
power setting is handy for those amateurs 
using tetrode-type grid-driven power tubes, 
such as the 4CX250B. I should also mention 
that operation of the power output control is 
fairly linear. 

Conclusion 

If you would like to add 2 meters to your 
present station with an afl-in-one transceiver, 
you should consider the TS-71 1 A, In general, 
it performs as well as any other 2-meter multi- 
mode on the market (with few exceptions), is 
easy to set up and use + and does offer some 
nice features in addition to the usual comple- 
ment of bells and whistles, ■ 



DEALER 

INQUIRES 

INVITED 



ANTENNES 

TON IMA The 




52 Stonewyck Drive 
Belle Mead, New Jersey 08502 

IVARS - KC2PX 
MARA - SALES 




INA 

MON-SAT (201)874-6013 

10AM -3PM ORDERS 

7PM - 10PM ORDERS/TECHNICAL 



CALL FOR CATALOG 



ice 



VISA/MASTERCARD 



Whpn You Buy. Say 73 



ii 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 25 



Tokyo Hy-Power Labs HL-22V and HL-102V 

220-MHz Power Amplifiers, 

by Peter H. Putman KT2B 




Encomm. Inc. 
1506 Capital 
Piano TX 75074 
Price class: HL-22V $100 
HL 102V $300 




*%**»• 



•**#!' 



P f • 



HL-22V 



HL-1Q2V 



With all of the increased interest in 220 
MHz nowadays, it's nice to see that 
more and more of the major Japanese manu- 
facturers are coming out with a wide range 
of products for the band, including hand- 
helds, mobile radios, and rf amplifiers. This is 
somewhat unusual when you consider that 
220 MHz is strictiy a North American alloca- 
tion. However, Kenwood, ICOM, and Azden 
recently had their investment in 220 MHz 
pay off when Novice 220 privileges were 
approved. 

Now we have a new player. Tokyo Hy-Pow- 
er Labs, a subsidiary of Encomm. Inc., has 
introduced two rf power amplifiers with built-in 
receive preamplifiers for 220-225 MHz, The 
HL-22V is designed to be used solely as a 
handie-talkie "booster** amplifier in the home 
or while mobile. It features a GaAsFET 
preamp and about 20 Watts output for a maxi- 
mum of 2 Watts drive, The HL-1 02V can func- 
tion in a base-station or mobile mode and will 
provide about 100 Watts output with a maxi- 
mum of 25 Watts drive. 

Out of the Box 

The HL-22V housing uses the same extrud- 
ed polished heat-sink design that THL has 
become known for, Controls are simple: a 
power switch and a preamp switch, Three 
LEDs provide indication of dc power, preamp 
on, and TX. Rear-panel connections consist 
of SO-239 connectors for your hand-held 
and an antenna, plus dc power leads. No 
provision is made for hard-keying of this am- 
plifier The unit is extremely small— 3-7/8" x 
1-3/8" x 5-7/S"— and can be slipped into a 
glovebox, under your seat, or wherever you 
want in your car. 

The HL-1 02V housing also has an extruded 



aluminum heat-sink casing. This amplifier is 
considerably larger and measures $-3/4* x 
2-3/8" x 10-3/8". which is still small enough to 
fit under a car seat and of course a home 
station setup. Front-panel controls include a 
main power switch, a mode switch (FM/3SB) 
which sets the dropout delay on rf VOX key- 
ing, a preamplifier switch, and a power-level 
switch which in this particular review model 
served no apparent useful purpose, as I'll 
mention later LEDs display power on, RX 
preamp on, and TX. In addition, a meter is 
provided to show power output, but the scale 
is not very precise other than at the 60-Watl 
position. 

The rear panel of the HL-1 02V features SO- 
239 input and outpul connectors, dc leads, 
and a four-pin connection for hard-keying on 
either a PTT ground tine or **+" voltage, This 
is the same connector that Kenwood used to 
use for touchtone^ pad connections on their 
old TR-7400A series radios. On both of these 
amplifiers, the SO-239 connectors are of the 
single-hoie type with a threaded barrel as op- 
posed to the flange-type mounting (such as 
that used on Mirage amplifiers). I'd also prefer 
a Teflon 1 * dielectric in these connectors at this 
power level and frequency. 

Inside 

Now T let's look at the lineup of devices. 
The HL-22V employs one gain stage— a 
2SC1946A running at about 10 dB, The RX 
preamplifier device is a 3SK121 GaAsFET 
(disk type) and the manufacturer claims about 
20 dB gain from this device. The HL-1 02V 
employs a pair of 2SC2360 devices with a 
substantial internal resistive pad that dissi- 
pates 12 Wans (otherwise the devices would 
be overdriven). The RX preamplifier is a 



2SK241 MOSFET. and again THL claims 
about 20 dB of gain in this stage. 

On The Air 

The HL-1 02V caused some problems for 
one of my driving sources, a Microwave Mod- 
ules MMT 220/28 transverler which really 
likes to look into a 50-Ohm load most of the 
time. During on-air use. the transverter would 
actually go into oscillation even with the key- 
ing removed Even after retuning the trans- 
verter. the condition cropped up from time to 
lime, so I suspect that rf leaking back through 
Ihe dc leads may also have caused some of 
the problem. 

The HL-1 02V was connected from the MMT 
220/28 to a KLM 220-14 yagi using conven- 
tional 9913 cable. The power source was an 
Astron RS-35A> which is more than adequate 
since the amplifier needs 16 Amperes maxi- 
mum to work. Current draw on the HL-22V is 
much lighter at 3.5 Amperes maximum, and if 
was connected to a 7-element vertically polar- 
ized KLM yagj and driven by an ICOM 3AT 
with standard battery pack. 

On-air reports about the HL-102V were sat- 
isfactory. No distortion of the SSB signal was 
reported by any listeners. Since t use hard 
PTT keying exclusively on VHF, I selected the 
FM mode for instant dropout to RX, (Note that 
this switch has nothing at all to do with linearity 
of the amplifier— just the dropout delay time 
constant!) I chose also to use the HL-1G2V as 
my 220 contest amplifier during the January 
VHF Sweepstakes and worked a number of 
interesting grid squares, with contacts as far 
away as Quebec and upstate New York giving 
good reports. Fortunately, the rf feedback 
problem didn't appear this lime! 

The HL-22V found use as a booster amp 





HL-1 02V 




Specification 


Measured 


Claimed 


Preamplifier Gain 


10 dB 


20 dB 


Preamplifier 1-dB Comp. 


-6dB 


N/A 


Preamplifier 1 -dB Gain BW 


210-230 MHz 


N/A 


Max, Transmit Power 






(Output / Input) 


100W/25W 


110W/25W 


Current Draw 


16 Amperes 


16 Amperes 


Input Vswr 


Less than 1.1:1 


N/A 



Table 1 Performance data for the HL-IQ2V amplifier 
26 73 Amateur Radio * April 1987 





HL-22V 




Specification 


Measured 


Claimed 


Preamplifier Gain 


14dB 


20 dB 


Preamplifier 1-dB Com p + 


+5dB 


N/A 


Preamplifier 1-dB Gain BW 


21&-235MHZ 


N/A 


Max. Transmit Power 






(Output / Input) 


20W/2.5W 


20W/2W 


Current Draw 


3 Amperes 


3.5 Amperes 


Input Vswr 


Less than 1 .1 : 1 


N/A 



Table 2 Performance data for the HU22V amplifier 



from the shack for my occasional forays onto 
local 220 repeaters and 223.50 MHz, and oth- 
er than reports of increased signal strength, 
no unusual comments were made by listen- 
ers. It's been my observation that most of 
these small HT booster amplifiers are very 
reliable and tend to sit quietly in the comer 
doing what they are told, day in and day out, 
without a fuss. The HL-22V was no exception 
as it is truly a set-it-and-forget-U unit to be 
buried in the car someplace. 

Come Here, Igor 

Off to the laboratory! The test lab setup was 
an H-P 608F generator, Boonton 92 millivolt* 
meter, and Bird 43 wattmeters with 5C. 10C 
and 100G slugs. The power source was a 
Sorensen 20-Amp rack-mount supply, and I 
used a Bird 600-Watt dry dummy load for 
transmit tests. 

Take a close look at some of the numbers in 
Tables 1 f 2; and 3, Rrst of all. the 1-dB com- 
pression point of — 6 dB on the HL-102V is 
terrible, I'm pretty surprised at this, consider- 
ing the design, and must conclude that the 
particular device used in this amplifier must 
have been a fallout? A well-designed preamp 
ought to have a compression point close to 
dB or better. Happily, the numbers are much 
better on the HL-22V with a + 5-dB compres- 
sion point, and this preamp offers good perfor- 
mance with 14 dB of clean gain. 

Both units are reasonably broadbanded on 
receive and on transmit. The HL-22V runs 
somewhere between 9 and 10 dB of gain on 
transmit, while Ihe HL-102V is cooking along 
at about 7 to 8 dB, and the variance in the 
latter amplifier is no doubt due to the n on lin- 
earity of the input resistive pad at different 
power levels, I was able to get about 25 Watts 
out of the HI-22V, but it took over 3 Watts to do 
it T so consider it saturated at 2.5 Watts drive. 
Under no circumstances could I get more than 
100 Watts out of the HL-102V, even with 30 
Watts of drive, so it definitely saturates at 
about the 25-Watt input leveL 

Now, to get to that hi/lo power-level switch. 
According to the owner's manual, this switch 
drops the output to about half in normal ser- 
vice. In actual service, however, with 20 Watts 
of drive applied, flipping this switch to lo re- 
sulted in the power output dropping from 90 
Watts to 32 Watts, With 1 5 Watts of drive, the 
outpul fell from about 75 Watts to 22 Watts. 
This, in effect, cuts the gain to about 1,5 dB 
and essentially takes the amp out of the line! J 
suspect that the resistive pad that is switched 
in here is too large, and a value should be 
recalculated to drop the output by perhaps 3 
dB instead of almost 6 dB. 

With the proper size pad. you would then be 
able to run, say, 100 or 50 Watts out for 25 
Watts of drive, and 60 or 30 Watts out for 10 
Watts of drive. This might be useful if you 
intend to employ a grounded-grid amplifier 
such as the 8874 or 8877 type, as these would 
result in output level variations from 400 to 
1 ,000 Watts with such an amplifier. This, of 
course, would result in less overall dc power 
consumption from your outboard supply, 
which could be handy at times. 
The heat sinks in both amplifiers are ade- 







HL-22V 


HL-102V 


0.3/1 


1/6 


0.5/3 


3/20 


1/9 


5/36 


1.5/15 


10/60 


2/18 


15/76 


2-5 / 20 


25/100 







Table 3, Transmit linearity (input / Output) 
measured at 223.50 MHz. 



quate; the HL-22V more so, Sustained contest 
operation on C W and SSB resulted in the case 
of the HL-102V getting qutte warm but not 
unbearably hot to the touch. It does not ap- 
pear from the schematic that either amplifier 
incorporates any form of overtemperature 
protection, so be sure to allow sufficient venti- 
lation wherever you install them — a good idea 



anyway. Vd like to mention also that THL has 
used a high-quality 50-Ohm Tohtsu coaxial 
relay in the HL-102V, unlike some manufac- 
turers who insist on using dc-type relays to 
save a few bucks. It's worth the extra money at 
220 MHz and above — believe me. 

Conclusion 

If you are looking for an alternative to the 
limited supply of 220-MHz amplifiers, the HL- 
22V or HL-102V might be for you. Both are 
rugged units that fill the 20-Watt and 1 00-Watt 
gaps nicety. The preamplifier in the HL-22V 
works exceptionally well and is ideal for a 
high-density rf environment. The HL-102V 
preamplifier didn f t make the grade, but I have 
to believe the unit I tested was just plain defec- 
tive. (It's something you may wish to follow up 
on with Encomm if you are considering the 
purchase of this amplifier,) For more informa- 
tion on Tokyo Hy-Power amplifiers, circle 
number 201 on your Reader Service card ■ 



OPTOelectronics 1300 H Frequency Counter 
Wenzel Associates Counter-Mate Frequency Standard 

by Peter //, Putman KT2B 

OPTOelectronics, Inc. 
5821 N.E 14th Avenue 
Ft. Lauderdale FL 33334 
Price class; $150 



Wenzel Associates, Inc. 

11124 Jollyville Road 

Austin TX 78759 

Price class: $350 




Photo A OPTOelectronics ' 1 300 H hand-held 
frequency counter. 



Here are a couple of interesting products 
you may find of use around your shack . 
The first, OPTOelectronics* 1 300 H hand-held 
frequency counter, would be of interest to the 
VHF/UHF enthusiast, as it covers up to 1300 
MHz wfth two sensitivity ranges and a whip 
antenna. The second, Wenzel Associates' 
Counter-Mate Frequency Standard, is an 
oven-regulated, crystal-controlled source of rf 
at 1 and 10 MHz with external dc supply. 

1300 H 

The 1300 H counter is small. With dimen- 
sions of 4- x 3.5" x 1 ". this unit was intended 
to be used in the field to make quick frequency 
checks, but it also serves well in the laborato- 
ry. (An accessory carrying case is available, 
but there's no hole for the accessory whip 
antenna should you wish to use the counter in 
inclement weather ) The 1 300 H is actually the 
top-oMhe-line product in a range of portable 
counter models, Including the 1200 HKC 
[1200 MHz, kit form) and 1200 HC (1200 MHz, 
wired), and runs off rechargeable NiCds or the 
included ac power supply/charger. 

The whip antenna is an option, as is a 50- 
Ohm terminated probe, Both sell tor less than 
$20 each, so if you plan to do a tot of measure- 
ments in the lab, I'd spring for the pair. OP- 
TOelectronics claims "excellent sensitivity" 
for these units, with levets of 3-50 mV from 
10-1000 MHz being typical. I decided to 
check for myself using a signal generator and 
came up with the numbers in Table 1 . 

It's apparent that the greatest use of the 
1300 H is from about 50 MHz to 400 MHz, for 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 27 



Measured Frequency 






LO Sensitivity 






HI Sensitivity 


10 MHz 






-23 dBm 






-23 dBm 


30 MHz 






-28 dBm 






-29 dBm 


50 MHz 






-32 dBm 






-37dBrn 


100 MHz 






-36dBm 






-39 dBm 


150 MHz 






-34dBm 






-40dBm 


200 MHz 






-31 rjBrn 






-44 dBm 


250 MHz 






-28 dBm 






-40 dBm 


300 MHz 






-26 dBm 






-41 dBm 


350 MHz 






-24 dBm 






-38 dBm 


400 MHz 






-21 dBm 






-31 dBm 


450 MHz 






-l7dBm 






-25 dBm 


902 MHz* 






-6 dBm 






-6 dBm 


1296 MHz" 






+6 dBm 






+2 dBm 


'These measurements 


were 


made using an HP-608F 


generator and 


a Boonton 92 rf 


millivoltmeter— except 


at 


902 and 1296 MHz t where 


precision 


QRP wattmeters and 


attenuators were used. 















Table 1. OPTOeiectronics 1300 H counter measured sensitivity, 



after this point the sensitivity drops off rapidly. 
For reference, a level of -25 dBm is 9 milli- 
volts and - 40 dBm is 2 millivolts Sensitivity at 
902 and 1296 MHz falls off so much that you 
will have to use a source of rf at belter than 1 00 
millivolts to get a reading to lock up. This still 
would allow measurement of tow4evel mixer 
and oscillator stages running in the high mi- 
crowatt range 1 and, of course! hand-held 
radios and transverters can also be tested 
with ease 

There are two selectable gale times — ,25 
seconds and 2.5 seconds— that allow res- 
olution to 1 kHz and 100 Hz, respectively. 
OPTOeiectronics claims accuracy to be about 
+ 1 ppm (±.0GO01%). As I couldn't verify this 
claim without a very accurate VHF frequency 
standard, I'll have to take their word for it. The 
display is an eight-digit, red LED-type with 
decimal-point indication at the MHz mark, 

Counter-Mate 

The Wenzel Associates Counter-Mate Stan- 
dard is claimed to be very accurate, but I 
couldn't use it with the 1 300 H since it gener- 
ates a 5-V-rms square wave at 1 and 10 MHz 



The 1300 H read this 10-MHz signal at either 
20 or 30 MHz depending on the mood it was in, 
and this isn't surprising considering that a 
square-wave signal of this nature will be rich in 
harmonics. It does make the Counter-Mate a 
very strong 1-MHz marker generator! 

The Counter-Mate contains a sophisticated 
scheme using a third-overtone, 10-MHz crys* 
tal in an insulated copper oven, This oven In 
turn is maintained at a high temperature to 
minimize ambient temperature effects, and a 
precision 50-turn trimmer can be accessed for 
recaltbratioa (Wenzel strongly suggests that 
you have them do the calibration and the de- 
termination of your aging rate between call* 
orations.) Frequency-divider chips provide the 
square-wave outputs suitable for TTL or 50* 
Ohm systems. In addition, external power 
splitters can be used with multiple counters. 
(With 5 volts rms, that's plenty of output for 
multiple counters!) 

I was able to connect the Counter-Mate to 
the 10-MHz input on my Ramsey Electronics 
600-MHz counter. \n fact, I'd probably leave ft 
connected most of the time as a standard on a 
scope as well. Wenzel Associates claims the 





*UNT!R*MATE FREQUENO STANDARD 










® 2L 



CT-flO COUNTER 



POWEfl 



i n n o n 

J L u 



Gate 



1 >) 5* C 



RANGE 



10 -JiH7 



Photo 0. Wenzel Associates Counter-Mate frequency standard (top) hooked up to a Ramsey 
frequency counter. 

28 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



aging to be less than ,03 ppm/month after one 
week of operation, so it is certainty more sta- 
ble than, say, the 1 300 H counter, which ages 
at the rate of .1 ppm/month. You'd expect that 
kind of stability with a proportional oven, how- 
ever. Retrace (the ability to come up to the 
same displayed output again and again after 
power-up cycles) is rated within .01 ppm of the 
previous frequency after 60 minutes, based 
on a 24-hour downtime. 

This means that if you plan some very pre- 
cise measurements, turn the unit on about an 
hour before you plan to start. Indicators on the 
front panel display power on and heady (when 
the oven has reached its correct operating 
temperature— not when the crystal has stabi- 
lized). If you plan to use the 1 -MHz output as a 
calibration source for HF radios, use a large 
attenuator, say, 10 dB; otherwise, you may 
overload the front end. The harmonics are 
strong enough right up through 50 MHz for 
precise calibration work. 

Conclusion 

Both the 1300 H and the Counter-Mate are 
useful additions to the shack, especially the 
former unit, which lends itself nicely to field- 
testing of alt kinds of VHF radio equipment. 
The latter unit would find more use with those 
engaged in precision measurements, but it's 
kind of nice to have such a standard if you use 
frequency counters or oscilloscopes in your 
station. 

Reader Service numbers: OPTOetectron- 
tcs, 202; Wenzel Associates, 2QZM 





HF Equipment Regular SALE 

IC 735 HF transceiver/SW rcvr/mic t 999.00 79 9« 

PS-55 Eternal power supply 199.00 179* 5 

AM 50 Automatic antenna tuner... 445.00 349 s5 



Until 3-31-87. . . 
$50 FACTORY REBATE on AT-150 



FL-32 500 Hz CW filter..,. 66.50 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit 56.00 

UT-30 Tone encoder 1/ *i0 




IC-745 9-band kcvt wAl-30 MHz rcvr 
PS-35 Internal power suppiy ,., 

EX-241 Marker unit 

EX -242 FM unit...,. 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit ... 
FL45 500 Hz CW filter (1st IF) , 
FL-54 270 Hz CW fitter (Is! IF) . 
FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd 
FI-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 
FL44A SSB filter (2nd IF}... 



104900 899* s 
199.00 179** 

22.50 

44.00 

56.00 

6650 

53.00 

108.00 99 s5 
10800 99" 
178.00 159" 




IC-751A 9-band *cvr/.l-30 MHz rcvr 
PS-35 Internal power supply ..... 
FL 32 500 Hz CW filter [lsl IF)-* 
FL-63 250 Hz CW filter [1st IF).- 
FL-52A 500 Hi CW filter (2nd IF) . 
FL-53A 250 Hi CW filter (2nd IF) . 



FL 33 AM filter. 



MMIIM'l') 



Fl-70 2.8 kHz wide SSB filter... 

RC-10 External frequency controller 
Of her Accessories: 
IC-2KL 160- 15m solid state amp w/ps 
PS-15 2QA external power supply.,.,, 
PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6-pin plug 

0PC Opt cord, specify 2. 4 or 6-pin 
MB Mobile mount, 735/745/751 A.... 

SP-3 External speaker ,.. 

SP-7 Small external speaker .* 

CR-64 High stab. ref. xtal (745/751) 

r - 1 j pe □ k e r / p □ icn 

$M~6 Desk microphone „,.,, ,..,..... 

SM-8 Desk mic ■ two cables. Scan 

SM-10 Compressor /graph EQ. 8 pin mic 
AMO0 100W8-bandayto. antenna tuner 
AT-500 500W 9-band auto, antenna tuner 
AH-2 8-band tuner w/mounl & whip 
AK-2A Antenna tuner system, only.... 



1649 00 

199 00 

66 50 

54 50 

L 08.00 

10800 

35,25 

52.00 

39.25 

Regular 

1999.00 

169 00 

299 00 

1000 

24.50 

6100 

4900 

63,00 

159.25 

4495 

78.50 

13625 

44500 

559.00 

625 00 

495 00 



1399 
179" 



99" 
99" 



SALE 
1699 
154*' 
269" 



149 



91 



124" 
389" 
489" 
549" 
429" 




ICOM 



Other Accessories - continued: Regular SALE 
GC-5 World clock 9L95 89" 

6-meter VHP Portable Regular SALE 

IC-505 3/10W 6m SSB/CW portable 549.00 489" 

EX-248 FM unit ..... 55,50 

LC-10 Leather case 39 50 



■ * ■ * ■ 



VHF/UHF base muffr-modes 
IC-551D SOW 6-meter SSB/CW. .. 

EX- 106 FM option - 

BC- 10A Memory back-up. 

IC-271A" 25W 2 meters ... CLOSEOUT 

AG-20" Internal preamplifier .♦,,.*, 
IC-271H 1 00 W 2 m FM/SSB/CW ... 

AG-25 Mast mounted preamplifier. r . 
IC-275A 25W 2m FM/SSB/CW w/ps 
IC-471A" 25W 430450.... CLOSEOUT 

AG-1" Mast mounted preamplifier... 
IC-471H" 75W 430 450 ... CLOSEOUT 

AG™ 3 5' Mast mounted preamplifier 



Regular 

799 00 

140,00 

9 50 

859.00 

64.00 

1099.00 

95.00 

1199.00 

979.00 

99 50 

1399.00 

95 00 



SALE 

719" 
126" 

699" 

969" 

1049 
769" 

999" 



'Preamp $9 M with 271A/471A/47IH Purchase 



Accessories common to 271 A/ H 
PS-25 Internal power supply (or (A)... 
PS-35 Internal power supply for (H)... 

SM-6 Desk microphone 

EX-3 10 Voice synthesizer 

TS-32 CommSpec encode/decoder.... 

UT-15 Encoder/decoder interface... 

UT- 1 5S UT- 15S w/TS 32 installed 

VHF/UHF mobile multi-modes 
IC-290H 25W 2m SS8/FM, nP mic,.. 
IC-490A 10W 430-440 SSB/FM/CW 

VHf/UHF/1.2 GHz FM 
IC-27A Compact 25W 2m FMw/TTPmic 
IC-27H Compact 45W 2m FMw/TTPmic 
IC-37A Compact 25W 220 FM, TIP mtc 
IC-47A Compact 25W 440 FM. TTP mic 

PS-45 Compact 8A power supply ... 

UM6/EX-3&8 Voice synthesrzef... 

SP-10 Slrm-lme external speaker ... 

IC-28A 25W2m FM. UP/DN mic 

IC-28H 45W 2m FM, UP/DN m*c...... 

IC-38A 25W220FM 

IC 4SA 25W 440450 FM.... 

HM-14 TTP microphone „.„„.„„ 

UT-28 Digital code squelch 

UT-29 Tone squelch decoder . , 

HM-1G Speaker/microphone 

IC-320QA 25W2m/440 FM w/TTP„„ 

UT-23 Voice synthesizer 

AH-32 2m/440 Oual Band antenna ... 

AHB-32 Trunk-iip mount 

Urstn PO-K Roof mount... 

Urstn PO-TlM Trunk-lip mount.... 

Larsen PO-MM Magnetic mount .... 
RP 3010 440 MHz, 10W FM, xtal cent. 
IC-120 1W L2 GHz FM Mobile 

ML- 12 1.2 GHz 10W amplifier 

IC-1271A 10W 1.2 GHz SSB/CW Base 

AG-1200 Mast mounted preamplifier 

PS-25 Internal power supply 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

TV 1200 ATV interface unit 

UM5S CTCSS encoder/decoder ... 
RP-1210 1.2 GHz f 10W FM.99ch. synth 



and 471 A/H 

, 115.00104" 

, 199.00179" 

. 44.95 

. 46,00 

. 59.95 

. 14.00 

, 92.00 

Regular SALE 

. 639 00 569" 

699.00 599" 



Regular 

429.00 

459.00 

499.00 

549.00 

139.00 

34.99 

35.99 

429.00 

459 00 

45900 

459.00 

55.50 

37.50 

43.00 

34.00 

599.00 

3499 

37.00 

34.00 

20.00 

20.18 

19.63 

1229.00 

579.00 

379.00 

1229.00 

105.00 

115.00 

46.00 

129.00 

92.00 

1479.00 



SALE 
369" 
399" 
439" 
479" 
129" 



369" 
399" 

399" 
399" 



499" 



1089 
499" 
339" 
1069 

104" 

119" 

1289 







MasterCard 





Hand-held* Regular 

IC-2A 2-meters 279.00 

IC-2AT with TTP 299.00 

IC-3AT 220 MHz. HP 339.00 
IC 4AT 440 MHz. TTP 339.00 

IC-02AT 2-meters 369.00 

IC-02AT/High Power 399.00 
1C-03AT for 220 MHz 44900 
IC-04AT for 440 MHz 449.00 



SALE 

249" 

259" 

299" 
299** 

299" 
339" 
399" 

389" 



IC-u2A 2 meters 299.00 269" 

IC u2AT with TTP,.... 329.00289"* 
Accessories for IC u2A/T (CALL) 

IC-12AT 1W L2GHz FM HT/batt/cgr/TTP 459.00 399" 

A-2 5W PEP synth, aircraft HT 599.00 499" 

Accessories for /C series Regular 

BP-7 425mah/13.2V Nicad Pak use BC-35 74.25 

BP-8 800mah/8.4V Nicad Pak - use 8C 35. . . 74.25 

BC-35 Drop in desk charger for all batteries 74,50 

BC-16U Wall charger for 8P7/BP8... 20.25 

LC-11 Vinyl case for Dli usmg BP 3 .... 2050 

LC-14 Vtnyl case tor Dli using BP-7/8 20.50 

LC-02AT Leather case for Dlx models w/BP-7/8 54.50 
Accessories for IC and fC-O series Regular 

BP-2 425mah/7.2V Nicad Pak - use BC35 ... 47,00 

BP-3 Extra Std. 250 mah/S.4V Nicad Pak ... . 37.50 

BP 4 Alkaline battery case.. , 15.25 

BP-5 425mah/10.8V Nicad Pak - use BC35 58.50 

CA-5 5/8-wave telescoping 2m antenna 18.95 

FA- 2 Extra 2m flexible antenna 1150 

CP-1 Cig. lighter plug/cord for BP3 or Dlx ... 13.00 

CP-10 Battery separation cable w/chp....... 22.50 

DC-1 DC operation pak for standard models 23.25 

HB 160 Mobile mtg. bkt for all HTs 24.50 

LC-2AT Leather case for standard models .. .. 54,50 

Rfi-1 Vinyl waterproof radio bag 34.95 

HH-SS Handheld shoulder strap 16.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone 47,00 

HS-10 Boom microphone/headset 23.25 

HS-10SA Vox unit for HS-10 fi Deluxe only 23.25 

HS-10SB PTJ unit tor HS 10 2325 

ML-1 2m 2,3win/10w out amplifier ... SALE 99.95 

SS-32H Commspec 32tone encoder 2995 

Receivers Regular SALE 

R-71A 100 kHz-30 MHz, L 17V AC .... . $949.00 799" 

RC-ll Infrared remote controller ... 67.25 

FL-32 500 Hz CW filter 

FL-63 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) .. 
FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF) 



•■■■lf*P«P" F 



66.50 

54.50 

178.00159" 

EX-257 FMunit.......... 42,50 

EK-310 Voice synthesizer 46.00 

CR-64 High stability oscillator xtal 63.00 

SP-3 External speaker * 61.00 

CK-70 (EX-299) 12V DC option 12-25 

UB-12 Mobile mount. -. 24.50 

R-70O0 25 MHz 2 GHz scanning rcvr 109900 969" 
RC42 Infrared remote controller . . . 67.25 

EX-310 VoEce synthesizer 46.00 

TV-R7000 ATV unit. 131.95 119" 

AH-7000 Radiating antenna 89.95 {[$} 



HOURS • Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATS line: 1-800-558-0411 answered 
evenings until 8:00 pm Monday thru Thursday. 
WATS lines are for Quotes & Ordering only. 
use Regular line for other Info & Service dept. 



All Prices in this list are subject to change without notice 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area} 

1-800-242-5195 



i fl 1M iW'Mi HWUQM*liGHI 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 

r BRANCH STORES 



Phone (414) 442-4200 

Associate Store 



WICKUFFE, Ohio 44092 
28940 Euclid Avenue 
Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio WATS 1-800-362-0290 

°^f 1-800-321-3594 



ORLANDO, Fla. 32S03 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. WATS 1-800-432 9424 

Outside i onri vni irii"! 



CLEARWATER. Fla. 33575 LAS VEGAS. Nev. 89106 CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 



1898 Drew Street 

Phone (813) 461-4267 

No In -State WATS 



1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

No In-State WATS 

Outside i oni\ an can 



E RICK SON COMMUNICATIONS 

545G N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 

Outside i ortn cti coa^ 



j» 1 800-327 1917 No Nationwide WATS S 1-800-634-6227 E s e 1-800-621-5802 



"When You Buy. Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 29 



Heath HW-99 
Transceiver 

by Errol Naimon KA9HCC 
and Putty Naimon KN2F 



Heath Company 
Dept. 01 1-442 
Benton Harbor Ml 49022 
Price class: $300 




Enter Heath's latest Novice transceiver, 
the HW-99. complete with an integral 
power supply and a solid 50 Walls on 10, 15, 
40 + and 80 meters. The rig is solid state and 
ruggedly designed, and should see years of 
trouble-free service. The minimal controls wilt 
simplify life for the Novice, but will utterly frus- 
trate just about anyone else. 

The front-panel controls consist of a power 
on/off rocker switch, a four-position rotary 
band switch, a large tuning dial, a volume 
adjust for output to speaker/phones, and a 
level adjust which varies the drive to the trans- 
mit amplifier chain. The level control Is func- 
tional only up to the nominal 5Q-W output limit, 
provided that output vswr is low; otherwise, an 
automatic-level-control (ALC) circuit derived 
from a directional coupler at the output of the 
transmitter overrides the front-panel level con- 
trol and cuts back the transmit drive, 

A 10-segment LED bar graph is used to 
display receive signal strength relative to a 
no-antenna (all segments off) condition. In the 
receive mode, the display source is the age 
detector tapped off the i*f amp. In transmit, the 
display is driven by a relative power amp 
which obtains a voltage from the ALC pickup, 
the directional coupler. No tuning controls are 
provided since the PA is a broadbanded linear 
and no tuning is necessary. 

The forward and reflected components are 
summed at the output of the coupler. If either 
forward or reflected power (or both) increases, 
so does the display indication; hence, a 
greater number of lights on the display does 
not necessarily mean more power out. Oper- 
ating into a high vswr toad can easily light up 
the whole bar graph, giving the illusion of 
higher power output even though little or none 
is actually getting out. 

The transceiver is executed on three single- 
sided boards: an oscillator board, a transmit/ 
receive (T-Rj board, and a power-amplifier 
(PA) board- Single-sided boards for rf kits 
have characteristics worthy of note for the 
uninitiated. On the plus side, they are less 
costly. The components are usually more 
spread out (i.e., less dense) than double-sided 
or multiteyered boards to make room for more 
routes, since almost all of the tracks must be 
crammed into a single layer. 

This allows for simpler kit building and trou- 
bleshooting. Most of the components are easi- 

30 73 Amateur Radio ■ April. 19$7 



ty accessible, and the chances of shorting 
something while poking about are reduced 
since those pesky traces and pads are hidden 
on the less-accessible underside of the board. 
On the other hand, since the traces are all 
on one side, they necessarily are arranged 
more densely even though the components 
are more spread out. Inevitably this means 
that many traces and pads at substantially 
different do levels will end up adjacent to each 
other, increasing the probability of a cata- 
strophic solder bridge during construction. 
Equally detrimental is the loss of a ground 
plane which would improve amplifier stability 
and harmonic suppression by providing an 
ultra-low impedance/inductance return for 
supply current as well as an effective shield. 

Building the Kit 

Construction of the kit is straightforward al- 
though not necessarily simple. Take the time 
to familiarize yourself with the instructions. No 
fewer than 1 (count 'em . , . 1 0l) double-sided 
pages of instruction-manual changes are in- 
cluded. To avert disaster, read over the 
changes carefully and enter them all tn the 
manual. Don't delude yourself into thinking 
that just by having the errata handy you will 
catch all of the goofs you won't! And do this 
before beginning construction, not as you go 
along, 

The time estimate for completion of the kit 
as given by Heath is 1 6 hours. It took me about 
twice that to complete the job, and a good deal 
more time to track down the ouches. 

Oscillator Board 

This is the largest board and the simplest to 
construct. I recommend that L218 be installed 
before capacitors C269 and C271-C274 to 
make it easier to push L218 lugs into the 
board. 

T-R Board 

This is somewhat smaller than the oscillator 
board, but it is more densely arranged and 
contains a number of hand -wound transform- 
ers and inductors which no doubt wilt prove 
challenging to the novice kit builder, Carefully 
note the position of the color dots and notches 
on rotary switch SW101 in the instruction 
manual changes or you will be lost in space 
later. Expect a battle from D123 and D124 as 



the leads are just barely small enough to be 
inserted into their designated circuit-board 
holes. 

Before building this board, check for a foil- 
to-foil short to ground at the junction of C134 
and C1 37 (about the middle of the board), My 
board was shorted there after construction. I 
thought it was a solder bridge, but after remov- 
ing all of the components in that section and 
meticulously cleaning all the solder off that 
part of the board, it still showed a dead short. A 
trusty X-acto* knife made "short" work of the 
problem. 

PA Board 

The power amp board is the smallest but not 
the least challenging Several hand-wound 
transformers make consiruction interesting. A 
special word of caution concerning the broad- 
band output transformer T304: Bare wires are 
soldered to prinled-circuit-board (PCB) pieces 
to serve as leads to connect the transformer to 
the PA board. Make sure that no part of these 
wires protrudes over the top of transformer 
PCB ends, since there is almost no clearance 
between the transformer and the PA shield. A 
sharp edge of a wire will easily penetrate the 
paper insulator on the PA shield and potential- 
ly short the 30-V supply to ground. You may 
wish to check up on that situation with an 
ohmmeter following installation of the PA 
board. 

The Chassis 

The ac wiring, 12-V supply, controls, and 
input/output jacks are all chassis mounted. 
Exclusive of the 12-V regulator (U1 ). the entire 
12-V supply is mounted on a 7-Jug terminal 
strip, With board-to-board interconnects here 
as welt this lug strip gets to be pretty busy, 
and, if difficulty arises, it is not easy to repair. 
Circuit-board mounting of this section would 
simplify life greatly. 

A word of caution: Configured as it is, U1 is 
not blowout proof. Output capacitor C12 (100 
uF) has ample energy storage to destroy U1 
should the input to U1 become shorted to 
ground. The schematic is somewhat decep- 
tive at the 12-V supply. Circuit board ground 
and chassis ground are shown as isolated. In 
fact, they are made common in at least two 
places here: first at the center tap of TVs 
secondary (the red/yellow wire) and the tab of 
3-terminal regulator U1. 

The board-lo-board interconnects are 
mo lex* terminals and are time-consuming to 
crimp without the proper tool. 

Finally, the headphone jack is a mono jack, 
If you have stereo phones (who doesn't?) and 
don't fancy listening with just one ear, you 
either will need a mono/stereo adapter or you 
will need to replace J1 with a stereo phone 
jack and tie P206-1 (center conductor) to both 
left and right channel phone lugs. 

Alignment 

Following repair of all the boo-boos, align- 
ment was a snap. Goofs: two diodes incorrect- 
ly inserted; three board shorts (two ours, one 
theirs); SW101 installed correctly, but shaft 
notch 180° reversed (see previous comments 
concerning instruction manual changes); bad 



C246: L2 10 up in a glorious puff of smoke; and 
J1 soldered incorrectly (don't rely on the picto- 
rial, 4-8, as it does not clearly show the lug 
hook-ups; you must rely on the schematic), 

However, the manual calls for equipment 
that the average Novice probably doesn't 
have: a 10-MHz frequency counter and an rf 
wattmeter capable of measuring 75 Watts. 
Finding C246 bad would have been diffi- 
cult without a scope, since rf voltages at 
the hfo are pretty low and would scarcely 
show up on the built-in rf detector. A 50-MHz 
scope came in handy here showing a beautiful 
low-level sine wave (on all bands) at the hfo 
side of C246, but only dc present at the hfo 
buffer side. 

It may be of interest to note that resistance 
readings given in the manual were obtained 
using a Heath IM-5218 VTVM, The manual 
notes that readings taken with other ohmme- 
ters (because of different measuring voltages 
and currents) may be considerably different. 
We found this to be true. 

Don't rely on your Healhkit* store for re- 
placement parts. I promptly ordered (paid up 
front) a list of alt necessary replacement parts 
as none were in stock. I was told that a two- 
week lead time was typical. I then ordered the 
same (equivalent) replacement parts from the 
will-call desk of a locaJ electronics wholesaler 
and subsequently picked up the parts three 
days later, ft has been two months, and I 
haven't heard from Healhkit yet- 
One disquieting feature I noted during align- 
ment of the vfo and in subsequent operation 
thereafter was the lack of a positive end stop 
on the tuning vernier. The mechanical end 
stop is supposed to be created by the end of a 
semicircular groove on the tuning dial within 
which ride two screw heads contained in the 
vernier assembly, tt is difficult to tighten the 
vernier assembly sufficiently on the tuning dial 
to prevent the dial from slipping as pressure is 
exerted against the stop. This knocks the vfo 
out of calibration and puts you off frequency. 
Because you are on the easy end of a gear 
reduction, you may not even notice that an 
end stop has been encountered, and you will 
be merrily knocking your rig out of calibration 
repeatedly. 

Operation 

For a Novice sitting down to use a transceiv* 




Crystal 
j Fitters 



For most Ham Rigs from: 
KENWOOD ■ YAESU HEATH KIT 

Also DRAKE FUC/7 Line, COLLINS 75S3-B/C, 
and ICOM FL-44A, 52A & 53A Clones 

Finest 8-pole Construction 
ALL POPULAR TYPES IN STOCK 

CW - SSB - AM 

ASK ABOUT OUR MONTHLY SPECIALS 

Phone for Information cr to Order. 

VISAIMC or COD accepted. 

FOX -TANGO Corp* 

Box 15944, W. Palm Bch f FL 33416 
Telephone: (305) 683-9587 "5a 



er for the first time, the HW-99 would be one of 
the least intimidating radios to operate, With 
such a simple and uncomplicated front panel 
there isn't much to adjust or misadjust. 
Healhkit understood the obvious inexperi* 
ence and jitters that go along with those early 
QSOs. This basic rig will help the Novice to 
gain confidence as s/he enjoys those first 
contacts. 

However, as the new ham gains experi- 
ence, the realization will come that there are 
some features that Heath could have included 
that wouldn't have complicated the front panel 
too much. We've already discussed how easy 
it is to change the vfo alignment by dialing the 
tuning vernier past the end stop, A crystal 
calibrator would come in handy to help the 
operator maintain correc! alignment or at least 
know how far off the dial is. It's always better to 
be sure of your frequency rather than to guess 
if your dial reading is accurate. As you gain 
new operating privileges by upgrading to a 
General-class license or higher, it wilt become 
more apparent that the dial may be 1 0-1 5 kHz 
off at one band edge — and the FCC frowns 
upon people who operate where they don't 
have privileges. 

Another complaint is the lack of a meaning- 
ful meter. The 10-segment LED bar graph 
looks impressive (all those tiny red lights), but 
can be giving you misleading information. The 
manual cautions you to never turn the level 
control past a point where more than eight 
segments are lit; It explains that if you do, rf 
power output will not increase because the 
ALC circuit will automatically reduce the carri- 
er level from the transmitter. 

We checked this with a Bird 441 OA watt* 
meter. The ALC worked as it should, but not at 
the indicated number of LED segments lit. For 
example, on 80 meters with seven segments 
lit, we measured 42 Watts output. We in- 
creased to 10 segments lit and obtained a 
peak power output reading of 58 Watts. As we 
continued to turn the level control 10 seg- 
ments remained lit and the power did cut back 
as it was designed to do. 

On 15m, 40m H and 80m, the power peaked 
at 10 LED segments lit, On 10m, four seg- 
ments lit was the maximum that would light 
and was the maximum power output. The 
maximum forward power we measured on 
each band was: 1Qm t 42 W; 15m f 71 W; 40m t 



62 W; and B0m, 58 W. We also found the level 
control to be very touchy. It didn't take much of 
a turn to dramatically increase/decrease pow- 
er output. 

The tuning diaJ is marked in 5-kHz incre- 
ments and numbers indicating frequencies 
are every 50 kHz. Markings every 1 kHz and 
numbers every 1 kHz would have been nice. 

One problem that I've encountered has to 
do with the volume control For most QSOs, 
il's fine. But when you're listening to a strong 
signal, it doesn't turn down far enough. More 
than once, IVe been blasted out of my head- 
phones because of this. (Or, if you're using the 
speaker, the sleeping kids could get blasted 
out of their beds.) 

Being a radio designed for the Novice, 
it doesn't have 20m, nor does it have the 
WARC bands. Adding the capability of hav- 
ing those bands would have necessitated 
extra circuitry (obviously) and may have 
meant using double-stded circuit boards. 
Since the object of this radio was to give the 
Novice a good start in amateur radio, to keep 
the kit building as easy as it could be, and to 
keep the price down, it probably isn't reason- 
able to expect it to include the other amateur 
HF bands. Nor is it reasonable to expect lots of 
other features that are found on more expen- 
sive HF rigs. This is a good, basic HF 
transceiver. 

Conclusion 

Using the HW-99 was fun. The receiver was 
clean sounding and sensitive. Most of the 
comments I received about the transmitter 
were good. Some of them were "Rig sounds 
great/' "Doing a good job/' "You can be 
proud of it t " "Sounds FB to me," and 'Very 
good." 

On the whole, the rig is a we 1 1 -conceived, 
straightforward piece of work. An experienced 
builder will not be at alt intimidated by it. The 
first-time builder probably will be. In use, with 
a good antenna, the rig performs admirably 
with minimal fiddling, no doubt much as the 
designers at Heathkit had imagined. The lack 
of adjustment and meaningful information 
about power output or state of tune given by 
the rig are its biggest flaws. 

For more information about the Heath HW- 
99 transceiver, circle number 206 on your 
Reader Service card ■ 



P/C Controlled Radio 

Interface your commodore or Apple II PC and Kenwood's 
TS940.81 1,71 lor 440 with COMPRAD Program all radio 
functions from your PC Keyboard Shortwave listeners: 
Station selections with one keystroke. 

Two disk package and manual $49.95 

(price Includes shipping) 
Send money orders only to: 

MISIL • 50 Notre Dame Rd. • Bedford, MA • 01730 
Available soon for IBM PC and Compatibles „« 



"When You 8uy> Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 31 



— 



John Wood WA4BPI 
1 101 Little Ehon Lane 
West Memphis AR 72301 



Dayton Digest 

Put over 20,000 hams in one place at one time 
and what do you have? Come on along and find out 



T~ here's just no getting around the fact thai 
the Dayton, Ohio, Hamvention is a peo- 
ple event — for the people, with a crowd of 
more than 22,000 anticipated for the April 
24-26 event, and by the people, with more 
than 300 volunteers on 3\ standing commit- 
tees to organize me event. 

If you'd like to learn more about the 36th 
annual Hamvention— and perhaps be a pan of 
the event amateurs around the world call * k the 
center of the ham radio universe' 1 — then take 
a few minutes to read this article. Til show 
you how to turn your dream of attending the 
1987 Hamvention into a reality I 

The Old and the New 

Each year. 1 find the Dayton Hamvention 
to be a more interesting mixture of what's old 

and new in amateur radio and in consumer 
and commercial electronics. With some ex- 
ceptions, the old can be found by browsing 
through the Hamvention flea market (which 
for 1987 is expected to hold more than 1 ,500 
spaces), while the new will be residing inside 
the host structure. Dayton's Kara Arena. 
Here. 200 to 250 spaces are set aside for 



"If you see a forum 

that you'd like to attend, 

give it priority because 

the forums come only 

once, while the buying 

and selling will be going 

on all weekend/' 



major exhibitors and their state-of-the-art 

products. 

Whether you like the old or the new or a 
mixture of both, you'll get your chance to see 
and touch it all during 2-1/2-day run of the 
Hamvention. 

Of course. there*s more to the Dayton af- 
fair than just buying and exchanging equip- 
ment. Each year, the Hamvention offers a 
variety of activities including the banquet. 




Photo A. The gales open ami the crowd comes flooding in. 



forums on most ham radio topics (more than 
40 in 1986), talks by the world's most famous 
and knowledgeable hams, FCC examina- 
tions, prizes, alternative activities, CW pro- 
ficiency tests, and much more during the 
Hamvention weekend. You can see why 
hams who make only one hamfest a year 
travel to Dayton, the granddaddy of them all! 

Planning Your Trip 

I guess the first step on the road to Dayton 
is obvious— gel with the gang and see who 
wants to go. To help them make up their 
minds, let them read this article and have 
someone who has attended a recent Hamven- 
tion come and talk about the experience. The 
ones who favor making the trip probably will 
have to arrange for time off from work if 
travel days are needed. 

To help you stay within a budget, plan early 
and order your room reservations through 
Hamvention Housing, 1980 Kettering Tow- 
er, Dayton OH 45401*1980. Most area hotels 
and motels offer a special rate for guests 
during the Hamvention. Although no reser- 
vations arc taken by telephone, you can get 
information about room rates and locations 
by calling Hamvention Housing at (5 1 3)-223- 
2612. 

Covering Expenses 

The average ham has most of his extra cash 
invested in his station, so here's a suggestion 
that could help defray the cost of your sojourn 
to Davton. 

The best way to raise funds at the Hamven- 
tion is to order a flea market space and sell 
some of your extra equipment. There are 
other advantages to having a flea market 
space. Having a piece of real estate at Dayton 
gives you a selling point as you gather your 
group together for the trip— they can sell their 
surplus also, and the space provides a focal 
point at which members of your group can 
gather between market raids and other 
events. 

The charge for a ilea market space has 
increased from S20 to $23; by dividing the 
cost among the members of your group, it is 
an expense easy to bear. 



32 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1967 



If the time required to man the booth is 
divided among the group members, each 
person gets the time to see the entire Ha in- 
vent ion. 

Persons holding flea market permits and 
registration tickets can enter the flea market 
beginning at 8 a.m., Thursday. April 23, to 
set up in their numbered, assigned spacers)* 
Selling officially begins with the opening of 
the Ilea market at noon, Friday. April 24 

Unfortunately* by this time of year all flea 
market spaces have been sold out for months- 
they're usually snapped up in the first couple 
weeks unavailability. No secondary selling of 
flea market permits is allowed, so if you want 
to go this route, start working on some major 
advance planning for Hamvention '8S. 

If you have any other questions about the 
flea market, you can call the special Flea 
Market Hotline at (513)-223-0923- This 
phone is in the home of Flea Market Chair- 
man John Grody WBHTKK and his wife, 
Cathy, so make your calls before 10 p.m. 
Eastern Time. 

What You'll See 

Now that you've bought your tickets, it's 
only fair that I tell you a little about what 
you'll see at Dayton. 

The first thing you'll notice is the crowd. 
Don't worry— the Hamvention organizers 
have prepared for this turnout, and it 
shouldn't inconvenience you unless you try to 
buy lunch precisely at noon or opt to get a free 
cap given away by one of the generous deal- 
ers. Here, the obvious tip is to eat lunch 
before or after the lunch hour to avoid wast- 
ing time standing in a long line. 

And it is important to save time at Dayton if 
you are going to see all of the new amateur 
gear and take mental notes on the incredibly 
low prices* 

For the last few years, Fvc been able to 
watch the price of 5-1/4" floppy disks falJ to 
the bargain level, in 1986, of S6 for 10. This 
special was available on the first day, but 
after the dealers ran out, the bargain was 
gone. So keep in mind that bargains at Dayton 
don't stay around too long and when the price 
is low and the expected demand is high, the 
opportunity w ill be as limited as the available 
stock. 

Keep in mind that handie-talkies are one of 
the hottest items sold at Dayton. If you see the 
one you Ve been yearning for at an acceptable 
price, ask the dealer how many he brought to 
the Hamvention and respond accordingly. 
Simply put. if he brought two and you warn 
one, you *d best buy it now . 

Other items can be handled differently. Say 
you're looking for a new low-band rig and 
you want to get the best price possible. Well, 
this is a big-ticket item and how new it is can 
affect how many the dealer brought w ith him. 
As a rule, the more expensive the item, the 
better chance you have of it being around on 
Sunday— the last day of the Hamvention. 

So Sunday is the best day for getting a 
dealer's best price. Buy then {or try to get the 
dealer's Sunday price on Friday or Satur- 
day), but don't forget to shop that price 
around the various dealers and see how they 




Photo B. You can V tell the plovers without a 
program. 

respond. After all. this is business and your 
goal is to get the best product for the best 
price. That's what they advertise, so make 
sure that's what they deliver to you. 

Along with the dealers inside the arena, 
you'll also find a large select ion of manufac- 
turers who make use of the Hamvention to 
market their products and visit their dealers. 
They also are there to answer any questions 
you might have about their products, so if you 
are genuinely interested in purchasing* feel 
free to pick their brains. 

This brings up another unique opportunity 
that presents itself only at Dayton. The 
chances are good that the person you're ques- 
tioning about a product is a person who in- 
vented or developed it, not just a trained 





Photo C. 77ie hix manufacturers strut their 
stuff, 

marketing representative. Brother, that's the 
best source for product information you'll 
ever have, and Dayton is where you II find it! 

The Weather 

For the last three years, the Hamvention 
has enjoyed some of the best weather imagin- 
able. Clear skies and warm temperatures 

have blessed the Hamvention and have lulled 
some attendees into a false sense of security, 
thinking that rain on Hamvention weekend is 
an impossibility 

Lnfiirtunaieh , that's not the why the cold 
front crumbles. I've enjoyed the beautiful 
weather, but Fve also kept a heavy coat 
handy for the cold temps and precipitation 
Fve seen that can empty the flea market and 




Photo D. Chet Lambert W4WDR personally 
makes over 10*000 friends at eath Hamven- 
tion. 



Photo E. Ahhh. the flea market. Four people 
look on as one man decide* if he van afford to 
spend Si. 25. 

73 Amateur RadfQ • April. 1987 33 




Photo F. *Yes. ladies and gentlemen, these are absolutely the latest in technology, just off the 
boat from Japan, " 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Hamvention Information— (51 3H43-7720. 
Flea Market Hotline— (51 3>-223-0923. 
Housing Information— {513^223-2612. 

Flea Market Setup Day — April 23, Registration tickets and flea market permits must be 
shown together to gain admission to \he flea market prior to opening. 

Prices— Registration tickets are $8 in advance , $1 at the door; flea market spaces are 
$23; banquet tickets are $1 5 in advance, $1 7 at the door (if available). 



CHECKLIST 

D Get the group together, see who wants to go, then figure on how many vehicles you'll 

need to make the trip. 

Talk to the boss 10 arrange for the appropriate days off from work, 
D Secure room reservations for necessary mghts. 
QOrder registration tickets and flea market permits. 
DSave your money and gather the items you plan to sell at your flea market space(s). 

Bring twice as much money as you think you'll need. Be sure to convert cash to 

travellers checks for your safety and convenience. Don"l expect sellers to accept 

personal checks, 
OMake and carry a list of things you want to buy at the Hamvention. 
Q Hit the road. 



turn the inside of Ham Arena into an elbow - 
flattening crowd, 

En a word, the weather at Dayton is change- 
able. So check your forecasts before depar- 
ture, pack for the unexpected, and dress in 
layers like the outdoorsman so you can take 
off or put on clothing as the weather changes. 
Top off the layers with a waterproof jacket in 
case of rain or snow (Yes. it does occasional- 
ly snow in Dayton in April; I've seen it.) 

A* ■ '■■■■ 
rnval Time 

You've done all of the planning and finally 
the big day is here and you are in the city of 

34 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



the Wright Brothers, Dayton, Ohio. What 
should you do first? A little orientation trip 
might be useful, so head for Hara Arena. 
Don't know how? Motor down 1-75 to Need- 
more Road and exit west: turn right on North 
Main, then left on Shiloh Springs Road, and 
watch for Hara Arena to be on your right. 
Look around, locate the gates to the parking 
area and to the flea market, and go see where 
your flea market space is located. 

Next, it might be a good idea to check into 
your motel room and, depending on the time, 
grab a meal or tour one of Dayton's two 
leading attractions— the Air Force Museum 



at Wright-Patterson Field (10 minutes from 

downtown Dayton) or the Dayton Museum of 
Natural Hisiorv (home of the Davton Ama- 
teur Radio Association Club station. VY8B1 i. 

Whatever you do on Thursday night, try to 
get a good night's sleep; you'll need all the 
rest you can get to survive the first day of the 
Hamvention! Opening time is noon, but 
you'll need to be there early to set up your flea 
market wares and maybe check out what your 
fellow llea-marketeers have brought to sell, 
Buying and selling is prohibited until the Ilea 
market opens, but it's great to spot the bar- 
gains so that you can come back and buy them 
later. 

Once the Hamvention opens, enter the in- 
side exhibits through the main doors of the 
Silver Arena and you'll receive a free copy of 
the Hamvention program which contains a 
complete listing of activities, including fo- 
rums. Take a few minutes to look over the 
schedule, and if you see a forum thai you'd 
like to attend, give it priority because the 
forums come only once, while the buying and 
selling will be going on all weekend. Closing 
time on Friday is 6 p.m. 

On Saturday, the tlea market opens at 6 
a.m., while the inside exhibits open at 8 a.m. 
Both close at 5 p.m. to give all persons who 
plan to attend the banquet time to change and 
drive downtown to the Davton Convention 

m 

Center. 

Speaking of the banquet, if you miss it 
you're missing a big part of the Hamvention. 
In 1986, Roy Neal K6DUE was presented the 
Amateur of the Year Award— just one of the 
awards presented at the annual event. We not 
only enjoyed watching the award presenta- 
tions, listening to featured speaker Roy Neal, 
and eating a great meaL we also had a chance 
to get Senator John Glenn's autograph when 
he stopped by to congratulate his friend, Roy . 
That was an unexpected pleasure— but it was 
one of those lucky things that happen at 
Dayton, 

On Sunday, the flea market opens as on 
Saturday, at 6 a.m. , and the inside exhibits at 
8 a.m., but the level of activity slows as the 
time ncars tor the drawing for unclaimed 
hourly prizes at 2 p.m. and the drawing for 
major prizes at 3 p.m. In 1986, the major 
prizes included a complete Kenwood TS- 
940S station, and ICOM IC75IA HF 
transceiver, a Yaesu FT-1 HF transceiver, 
and a Shackmastcr 100 Station Controller— 
so if you feel as if you're due to win a prize, 
stick around! 

Additional Activities 

If I tried to write about all of the activities 
held in association with the Dayton Hamven- 
tion, I'd need all of the space in the magazine. 
But be aware that there are many alternative 
activities planned in a variety of interest 
areas. 

Now that you know how to do it, let me 
give you a formal invitation to join me at the 
36th annual Dayton Hamvention, April 24, 
25, and 26, 1987. Get the gang together and 
come on along. You should have a most en- 
joyable time at 'the center of the amateur 

lio universe, M See you there! ■ 



15 SUCCESS MANUALS that could solve your money problems once and for all! 



FASTEST, EASIEST . . . PROVEN PROFITABLE BUSINESSES YOU CAN QUICKLY START 
AND OPERATE FROM HOME WITH LOW OR NO CAPITAL . PART TIMEORFULL TIME. . . 



No experience required . Nothing complicated to study . Strictty legal and honest 
Each beginners Success Manual is Guaranteed to teach you everything you need to know to succeed fast! The perfect answer for ambitious men and women 



1. FIFTY QUICK. EASY AMD MOST UNUSUAL WAYS TO 
POCKEI "GIANT DOLLARS!" 
Here's your chance to discover how so many folks miss 
Qui on numerous opportunities to pull in some nig. last 
cash A most unique money opportunity book which 
quickly liiows you him fusl ordinary men and women 
fmm all walks of Idle are building spare time and ruU 
I uDe fortunes: plus home businesses, money secrets, 
wealth building mitt hods, oul-oMhe- ordinary plans and 
odd blue prints to success, plus more (only S6 95i 

2 . HOW ID STACK UP HU GE M AIL OflOCfl PROFITS — 
HAND OVER FIST WITHOUT BREAKING YOUR SACK 
(OB RtSKtMG AH ARM OR A LEG} 
Shows you haw la immediately set up — and get your 
operation oft to a smooth Hying start. Quickly teaches 
you short cut mail order Fundamentals from A lo Z. 
Crammed with mvtitt "me Its at the trad e and reveal m g 
money getting gimmtclts.' Imagine yourself receiving 
envelopes c o mam m g hun dr ed s oi dol I ars or more a day 
everyday - thai s the potential of mail order, {only £695} 



1 HOW TO SEW YOUR WAY TO PRETTY PROFITS 
FAST 

H i a bet that millions of women land men. loaf own their 
awn sewm g mac h in es an d It ul y enj uy sewi ng Th is 
peculiarly profitable book clearly demonstrates In them 
how to. virtually, lurn their sewing machines into money 
nuking machines and lake fast and lull advantage 
bl totfay? mosl promising market conditions Especially 
considering the present say high prices (only S6.95i 







<ti'Ki^iWI 



n.ia. 




t<i» f-i %ln 'u^.» war 'a 
IMTIf HO'<l|'tir' 



4 HOW TO TURN YOUR TELEPHONE INTO A 

MONEY WAKING MACHINE; 
Right now your phone is only costing you money — 
bul 1 1 you knew how to make it work for you . rl could be 
maArag you money Many people have heard about 
met) and women making handsome incomes., via their 
telephone But only a lew people know etacily how it's 
done, Complete easy- lo follow instructions, (only 56.95) 

Sl HOW TO EARN A FISTFUL OF MONEY WITH 

NEWPAPffl CLIPPINGS: 

imagine, earning good money by capping articles from 
newspapers? This unusual book instructs you in straight' 
lo Ihe ptunl, how- lo- information Fast starting operation 
by mai I on a I my shoestring cap i tal . U n us ual * ay to earn 
£50. SlOC S300 or more, weekly, ideal lor ampiiious 
Homeworkers spare-time or full (only 54 95i 

6. HOW REAL ESTATE CAN MAKE YOU A FORTUNE... 
USING OTHER "FOLKS MONEY: 1 ' 

Real estate has produced more millionaires than any 
other field The plans inside I his amazing fast fortune 
building book lellt why and how. in easy-ABC tashi&n 
team how to let other tolls money wort lor you, speculate 
in raw land and get back S5 lor every St you pul in. rake 
in huge profits on Uncle Sam s losses, set up i nice 
Income lor yoursell and your family with little or no 
investment lonly $6.95) 

7, WORK AT-HOME SUCCESS GUIDE 
(For Mm and Women} 

Time and lime again - successful spare time and full 
lime businesses are made with oul-ol the ordinary 
methods, oft heal money making ideas, prosperous home 
enterprises Shows how plain every day talks horn all 
walks of life can stack up good money Here* your 
opportunity h> go after incredible wealth, (only S195I 

1 AMAZING MONEY MAKING TREASURY OF 1 & 2 
INGREDIENT FORMULAS FHAT COULD PUT YOU ON 
EAST STREET 

TMt startling opportunity book places the little 
beginner operator with lin> capital in a most profitable 
position to manufacture sellable products All prepare 
lions require no more than two chemicals, many just one 
All represent a papular best seller kind ol product with 
both genuine merit and wide sales appeal No expensive 
equipment or fee rlr lies requited Vol can al most always 
pack everything from you? bi'chen ion1y|£95f 

9. WORLD S EASIEST MOST PROFITABLE 
MAIL ORDER BUSINESS . . , 

A relatively uncrowded business that any man or woman 
can enter regardless of age Book shows you how lo start 
■mail, with 'piggy bank capita' and grow prosperous ] 
after year Reveals Che surest most profitable and 
■terns to sell by mail Crammed with all the precious 
easy to understand details (only SS95) 

1fL TWELVE SIMPLE LITTLE KNOWN WAYS TO MAKE 
BIG MONEY FAST! 

An arnujng book thai clearly reveals a dozer ways men 
and women could pocket some real fast cash profits — 
it they only knew the n ght weaNti building moves to make. 
Th i s book qu i c k I y teac hes y o u a II Ihe necessary moves, 
shows you exactly how and whal to do to help assure 
your success (0nlyS695i 










WD«K AT tlOmt 



^ 



• ^H 



11 HOW TO SIT BACK ANO RAKE IN A BUNDLE 
SELLING BOOKS BY MAIL: 

Practically all mall order experts agree that absolutely 

nothing sells better by mail lhan books and there's 

nothing that sells easier than boots Better yet — you 

stand to make bagger a no taster net profits from selling 

books ay mail than you could realize on any other items. 

You will be shown everything from A to I (only 56 951 

12. HOW TD WIN BIG CASH ANO VALUABLE 
PRIZES CONTESTS: 

This unique book quickly shows you all the important 
inside tricks Opportunity to win national and local con- 
tests again and again Cast* can homes appliances 
fur; and vacations No other publication on Ihe 
market exactly like it. [only S6.95i 

13. BIO FAST FULL TIME ANO PART TIME 
PROFITS FOR WOMEN: 

Tins book isa remahcabje treasury ol unique but common 
cause easy to operate Little big" money making 
businesses for many millions of today's serious and 
enterprising women interested in Fabulous earnings. 
Independence and security Little or no investment and 
fasi starting full and part-time income increasing 
activities lonly S6 95i 

T4 EASIEST AND FASTEST WAY TO START A SUC- 
CESS? UL MAIL ORDER BUSINESS QN A SHOE STRING: 
Simple and mast effective step-by step mail order start- 
up and operating instructions written especially for 
beginners. Crammed with vital tacts Covers every 
aspect of this ei citing big money field, fonty 56.951 

15, HOW TD SEE THE WORLD... 
TRAVEL AND GET PAID WELL FOR FT: 
Everyone enjoys traveling But mosl people cannot 
afford In travel to those lar away places they dreamed 
ol visiting. Here's your chance lo lake in the wonderlul 
sights throughout the world — and actually get paid 
for doing it Yes it s truly possible that this little 
Inowu strict J t legal method could provide you with the 
information lot doing it (only S6 9&j 



—5" TO tin 




caHTnti 



-ft 1 






<.o»*itpuu Tim *Nti 



i 



*?& 



■at to tttpra 



4-1 -«-1 >i 




rntVEL *nn 41 T *mt 



4 



■ -. 



^ p^"» — * " 




Fifteen Uraya For Yon To Hive Bulging Bank Account** 
Beautiful Hornet, Expensive Clothe*, Jewelry, Exotic 
Nations . . . The Very Best College* For Vow Kids . . . 
Pins, Keep A Steady Income Flowing Inl 



Everyone «f the 15 ManuatV honu- -based businesses, can be 
sucefcssfutiv operuh-tl. by a single person, retirees, unemployed 
p vi i p 1 1 — mil is t i dca I for h u s b a n d ' h i ft- 1 earn* — and can btv almost , 
instantly turned rnlo an entrrpristnH family npifralrd business, 
kids can hflp 1»o. tt ith exvrvtine pitching in , , , your bu^rm-ss 
could <-uddt-nt\ lalfL a r»ff. and profltn t^uld incrtaje fasl! 



More- Businesses You Opera te . . . More Money Yon 
Make * * * Guarantees You Riches Beyond Your 
Wildest DrraflUi 



So, he sure to keep in mind that: Even though, it **■ true — itomi 
iSood money ccmld be made with jiisl a single ontr of tbi 'm 
staii- up success manuals working for you . . , hut, much better I han 
that, yuu i!«u!d give yourself rt ^reatur opjHirtunily (n make your 
profits multiply much faster* by simply putting together a 
*uper powerful profitable combination of five< ten^ or more of 
(§ie*e fifteen — fastest, ea^ie^t * . . proven profi table businesses 
out ol over a thousand til our files. Imagine having them all 
operating, and bringing in bit* hefty profits for you. at Ihe same 
time! Hut you must send your order in right away. Supplies are 
extcmely limiled at these special introductory low prices? 



nnrr The More Success Man sals You Order 
I'lvEfllr Tie More FREE limited Editions Ion Get 



Buy Anv 2 to 5 St CCESS MANUALS And Get Fret-! Any 
One Of The Three LIMITED LDITIOIVS Behm; or Buv 
Any 6 to 10 SUCCESS MANUALS And Get Free! Anv Tk>» 
Of The Three Below, or Buv Anv 11 to 15 SUCCESS 
MANUALS And U( Freer 4U Three Below 



F ■ U HMJ31 U.\ fMC CAS* 

<6u wro 'W * huhrt 




"C» tf)VK'- I 

tH#l LH.lT 1^ T^jlM Dt«T^ 

*1d N,B* MAO CAftHf 
■*l|*iC mTO Qflop 



P 



\ 




mow tDMIM ifluw. 
lHD LM I ijiu«ifJM*. ' Ota 

*!«■ LI<T\1 HLttall 




HOW TO RAISE 
Ail TWE CASH yOU 
*EtDiN AHURRT 
II vnu need 55.000, 520.000. 
SlOOUOOormarelohelp 
qeI your new bu tiness, ntl 
the Qr^und - chen . you'll 
mu ti c prtai n \y wtat u> ft id 
1ft ti toot Eirtn it yawn 
atna&f teen Eurnetf down 
by bands ..and Finance 
conipjniies. 



HOW TO (HJtCXiy 
WPEOUT AU 
YWfflOfflTSAMD 
TURN RAD CREDIT 
RATING INTO GOOD! 
Now with thiii tmazinrj 
booh - you can nop Dill 
toiktclon cold in Ineir 
tracks Hern your gotten 
opfjortumtr to net dui at 
debt HHltiDul bqrrnwirrD 



HOW TO RFTWE 
TOUNG AND UVE 
UJKUftlOOSLr ON 
VERY UTTIE MOHEY. 
Finally - n't possible 
lor you Id sa^' "rjoodbye" 
2nd "rjotid :idcljmce"ta 
mat obi Liuiejtrfl idea 
tot you mug retti»n on 
a boring nickel hid: dime 
wage slave, lime-clock 
punching jab until you 
reach 65 



FIMA111 - A tCAL OmMTOITTY TO 
EHJOV A tlCHEl . . . SeTTTER UFE 



ipurur^iinijr.iliun — SurcmluJ Bumiuiv Publi»hvrv 
nftcr ■■ wh4l i> pcrhanv ibi 1 lar^cs.1 Collation or" Iniguc 
Hrnmhu'ihu-i" Bc^jft«cT j Si»ctc*4 Mirtiul* in 1h. 
*fjrld! Oul at rmrr i IrwtusuMt ut hmtnriln in out 
""rinffltVftV tU« — m b am* hwiBtu *prtLil»4jii. 
hji^ pumbarnM^ft *cU<l«) Tbr 15 Faiinl, Easi^t 

M»^; hich-K ProfllAhlc pjM Ihtk jnUiwUhmi' 
llu-intiiM^ viju ncuj uthi-r bc^inniT3un4jiJiclcK sLirl .niJ 
i. .i- ilv opt Mil' from hum*; — with very kiw or. virty^tly, 

nil irm i --tllU li| 

Hun mjm ^ tht m rnntn, iht>hU HrofiUkM* Eftlri- 



— wd rkn.fii From M rbt^ svnc Ttm<? frutsMj, ai 
fiHtm it ymt'tt tlul ««btl:Hmt , TIk hi| ^hrtwd 
< urptPrtlLom, cjjf thi* jlmuil frttrrl met find dntTMll 

• j] ii m" wfoiL' h is. Tni'TiH s., ^ hiitK H<i«wtinsi bill word, wKirh 
>impK hi.ll- Jimn |n — hiving a ImI ol dilfvti'nl tiu'i 
nr*-4r*. ofh-r jlm£ . and pourinjj fa.fl-fjt pmlib 
into *w»r pcKfctl- ^1 ! ?*. ijmr [jrh 

liT fi iii rtiin imniiinirmi iiiiThil Th i 

'it I hew 1 5 Hnnin Profitable Bu» int^^c*. »-ou choou 
|4i«pAralr »t tbe htw time - - ■ lie bigftrr, *nd h*nt 
vtiur profit- muld hr! (tfcaurw.ouroritdniiEdtJun «*»ll 
priifFl &ft'W murcdulljir» if wiUfhiiuM: In pul fivk/. ten 
»r all ORren at" out nroivn prnTllalilc. start up sunt" 
flUAoiK to wot k for wu 

hul then — mby vko^ld &W rrui m< l Wftdert Am 
doll* re of profit tkriritr ma — mWrtA'i m, vbo ttaxkri 
jnd k-ttn* all ihv mvomo — w nullL-T hu» muih - 
^ifur dilttf mi hnmc huiin^SM^ hrinjfi in* Thcdcm.md 
Un nur uoinut- w«allh-buildirvin. fkfflinmt- smrM p 
Sinfi's*. ^Ijfi-ujU ha", bv vn ittm'L'rw ht'l m i njl . . . iinJ. 
uhdL'rttiindjhh *ji Hhk vncb thi'fr* abcululrFv rwjlhmu 
likr Ihemmithf nurkett 



Onr Nn-Riak 
Success Guarantee To You 



Vim must br abfioluivly, |>i»^,i|ivvlv. and lai.iH v 
MtnvinttiJ lliDt thr actual muncv making 
jilicces^ prnfllahilitv ot tMih manual is real 
— and may quickly itHiva*r ywr income 
or jwuioajf i>rt»rnoti^riiniwithirT ludav^ 
fur a prompt no juutfe rcfaai. j 

Hi mtrnbrr, those who snooze wilt certain I v 
Ihm'. UnwfVcr, Ihnst! whw chmiAt nithil n(m', 
to hv^in — car win, and rij;bt now. while 
tlwrv 4 « still time, i* I ht- ht- sl time (o begin . 
\ null br making 1 VeTV wt** and hifchlv 



BeginiMfs Start-Up 
Success Manuals Order Form 



l 
I 



Circle I be manuals you are prderinq 

1 2 t 4 S • I I 

4 ID 11 1Z 13 14 15 



„ I 

I hj«c(fiiedalM« me catalog number aleKhSacteD _ 
Manuall am or detinfl , and I w included III t proper amo un i | 
la help ewer shicj-pirig and nanrjlinrj k mriicate-d below Alio, . 
I m fully prelected try your rjrganizallon'K strong, no-risk 
ucce» guarantee mat unless I amtaiai^t cmvuited irul , 

Ivrtar-aadmayt^iril'rii^cnEaHJTiTiacome Juso-liuf . 
nrvjm ewryttjing intttt if dayi Mr a anrnfi. eo-bastic | 
full refund 

Total Success Manuals Ordered | 

full Annuml Enclosed , 

Be lire to include proper shir/Ding md handhRg fee - 
mdnpiknMr. 

iiypwB am h* »rx i kg uuhqes 

Ordering |uil one Succesi Manual Wc Si 25 tot S*H 

Ordcftng tram I to S Success Manuals Add W* psr 

cacJi minual 

Ordering hum b 1v 14 Success Manuals Add 50c per 

eatfanuput 

EhUOT aiG SAVINGS ON OflKfiS FOR AU 15 
SUCCESS MANUALS We pay all Shinpimj I Mjodong 
Coil |l htttf Hvmgj ot J7 501) 

Kale: We pay shipping and handling on Bach Limited 
Edilifln Manual pi ur order quahlit; lor 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 



One* in lb 

FflHI 



irhM iNkateteacft tatted 



bad CrtPrt rating into godd 

Hew Id rifje all tbe eath rou need 

in a hurrv 

How tfi retire young and live luxuriously on wy 
Irrtiinwr- 



I 
I 
I 



| METHOP OF PAYMENT itU pritii are it US liHHhi 

My chech d/ money ardens enclosed ickmniiend 



I 

I 



currency ihruugn ihe mail). 

Sorry - due lo high percentage of iaie charged by card 

companies - charge card orders nol atce^leif 

SHIP TO 

Him* 



Address, 



Mi 



hp._ 



i 

| Cornpleie this order form and mail to 

SUCCES5 BUSINESS POBUSHEBS 
I 110 W ,5th Street Dept. AR-1 

I mmm ^insiQivSalerri, NX. 27101 

I 1985 5ucr.es.tful Butmea Publishers 



I 

I 

_l 

-I 

II 

I 

I 

-I 



"When You Buy. Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 35 



William fL Stocking WWM 

Silent Kt\ 



QRP Antenna Farming 

Your antenna can be the single most important factor in QRP 
success — W0VM plants the seeds for more efficient operation 



Nearly everything that has been written 
about QRP operation points out the need 
for having excellent antennas. For best re- 
suits, a QRP "'antenna farm" should have 
two or more antenna systems, and the opera- 
tor should be able to switch from one antenna 
to any one of the others instantly. It is rather 
useless to dream about farms up on high hills 
with long-wire antennas supported by poles 
100 lect tall and a rotating beam on top of a 
100- fool -tall tower. Most amateurs have to 
make do with the space they have, 

My friend Harry once lived in a small 
house on a very small lot. When asked about 
his antenna farm at that location. Harry 
wrote. "*Over the years. 1 wore out the roof 
putting up and changing antennas. But the 
main antenna that got me WAC (Worked 
AJ1 Continents) was the vertical J on 20 me- 
ters — with 100 Watts maximum power. The 
antenna didn't l do* much until I added the 
extra height so that the bottom of the 33- 
foot radiating portion was above the power 
lines going down the alley. Incidental! 
those power tines were just 1/2 wavelength 
away from the 20-meter antenna. That last 
bit of height cleared the way for some good 
results, Press the key and they came back 
quite well." 

Harry had to go up quite high to get good 
results, ' "There is no substitute for height" is 
one of his favorite and most repeated sayings. 
In front of Harry's house is a large tree A 
wire 99 feel long runs from the shack up into 
the tree and out to the pole on the back of the 
house on which the vertical J antenna is 
mounted. The top of the pole is 52 feel above 
the ground. Another wire, 33 feet long, runs 
from the shack horizontally along the side of 
the house. 

The transmitter's output is inductively cou- 
pled to a coil , One end of this coil is connect- 
ed to the end of thc99-foot wire, and the other 
end is connected to one side of a large vari- 
able capacitor. The oilier side of the capacitor 
is connected to the shack end of the 33-foot 
wire that runs along the side of the house. 
With this arrangement, the antenna system 
can be tuned to resonance at any frequency in 

36 73 Amateur Radio ■ April, 1987 



either the 40- or 80-meter band, Harry wrote, 
'"This antenna was good for ail U.S. cover- 
age and all of Canada. Again. 100 Watts 
maximum dc input to the final stage- ' 

Harry's small antenna farm proves several 
things: ( I > It is important for an antenna to be 
up high and in the clear; (2) an antenna sys- 
tem should be tuned to resonance on the exact 



"Antennas for QRP 

operation should 

have gain as compared 

to a half-wavelength 

dipole for the 
frequency in use. " 



frequency being used: (3 1 good results can be 
obtained even if the area available for antenna 
construction is small; (4) the low angles of 
radiation provided by a vertical half-wave- 
length antenna help in working DX stations; 
and (5) it is a good idea to experiment with 
many different antenna systems until you 
have one that performs well. 

Making Do With Space 

If you have little space for antennas except 
straight up, you will be interested in design- 
ing good multiband vertical antenna systems 
and mounting them way up in the air, as high 
as possible. With more space, you could plan 
and build a better antenna farm, possibly us- 
ing a multiband antenna that would work on 
80, 40, and 30 meters and on the higher-fre- 
quency bands as well, You could also have 
a rotating beam antenna for 20, 15, and pos~ 
sibly 10 meters. (Someday, 10 meters will 
again be usable. Hi!) A tuned-doublet or 
eenter-tcd-zepp antenna system would be 
ideal for use on 80, 40, and 30 meters. * 
For best results on 80 meters, the wires 
should be at least 66 feet each side of the 
tuned feeders. 



If you don't have the space for 66 feet of 
wire each side of center, shorter lengths will 
work quite well so long as the length each side 
of the center is exactly the same. Also, in 
some cases, the ends of the 66~foot-long 
wires could be bent around and strung up at 
an angle to the rest of the wire. 

So thai the antenna system will work well 
on 80 meters, it is a good idea to make the 
wire lengths at least 35 feet each side of the 
center. In most parts of the United States, 
antenna wires running north and south are 
desirable so you can send best east and 
west, This north/ south -running 80-meter 
tuned doublet, when used on the 20- and 
1 5-meter bands, would have strong lobes ex- 
tending northeast, northwest, southeast, and 
southwest. 

With this kind of antenna located in St. 
Louis County* Missouri, I have made good 
contacts in Europe and eastern Asia on 20- 
and 15-meter CW. I have also made 40- and 
15-meter CW contacts with European sta- 
tions with the 1-Watt output of a Hcathkit 
HW-8 transceiver. 

If possible, a QRP antenna farm should 
have a rotating beam antenna for 20 and 15 
meters (and 10 meters someday). Al easily 
attainable heights of 25 and 30 feet (or less), a 
vertically polarized cubical-quad antenna 
Will outperform a three-element horizontal 
beam. 4 5 1 worked YU5FAM in Yugoslavia 
with my vertically polarized quad with the 
2-Watt output of a Heathkit HW-8 transceiv- 
er. This quad was fed with tuned feeders, and 
it loaded up and worked well on 15 meters 
also. For QRP operation, using tuned feeders 
is the best way to get the rf from the transmit- 
ter into the antenna. 

Where space is limited, you could use a 
combination of vertical and horizontal ele- 
ments or a vcrtical-slanten ff you have lots of 
space, you could try vee-beam or rhombic 
antennas aimed in favored directions. Low- 
frequency triangle or quad loops arc other 
possibilities/' ' The "Loop Sky wire" anten- 
na described in the November, 1985. issue of 
QST should be an excellent performer for 
QRP operation. All of these antennas should 



be fed with tuned feeders for best perfor- 
mance in QRP operation. 

Tuned feeders will also provide full-fre- 
quency, all-band coverage with fewer anten- 
nas than if coax feed is used To obtain simi- 
lar but less effective results with coax-fed 
antennas, four different antennas would be 
required: one for 80-meter CW, one for 75- 
meter phone, one for 40-meter CW, and one 
tor 40-metcr phone, 

Even with four coax-fed antennas, the re- 
sults would not be as good as those obtained 
with the erne tuned -doublet antenna system 
because the tuned doublet can be tuned to 
resonance on any frequency on any of its 
bands. On 40 meters,, the tuned doublet 
would have a gain of 1 .8 dB as compared to 
cither 40-meter coax- fed antenna, Further- 
more, unless these four antennas could be 
located quite far from each other, they would 
interfere with each other. 

Special Considerations 

Antennas for QRP operation should have 
gain as compared to a half- wavelength dipole 
for the frequency in use. An 80*meter tuned 
doublet (center-fed zepp) has gain as com- 
pared to a dipole on all of the higher frequen- 
cy bands. On 80 meters, it has some gain as 
compared to an 80-mcter coax-fed dipole, 
both because it can be tuned to resonance at 
the exact frequency being used and because 
the feedline (open-wire or twinlcad) has less 
loss than coaxial cable, 

The old adage "If you can't hear 'em, you 



can't work "cm" is as true today as when the 
statement was first used. Having the ability to 
switch instantly from one antenna to another 
often makes it possible to hear a station after 
it fades out on me first antenna. To make use 
of antenna switching during reception, all of 
the antennas must be tuned to the frequency 
being used. When the station to which the 
operator is listening starts to fade, he can 
quickly switch to the other antennas and lis- 
ten. He will use the antenna that brings in the 
station the loudest. This switching of anten- 
nas has saved many QSOs. 

Incoming signals often change polariza- 
tion, and this causes fading (QSB). Having 
one antenna with vertical polarization and 
another with horizontal polarization is useful 
for reception purposes. Having three anten- 
nas to which the operator can switch provides 
even more chances for good reception. 

"If they can't hear you f they can't work 
you 1 * is also true. Generally speaking, when 
operating QRP, it is a good idea to transmit 
using the antenna that has the most gain in the 
desired direction. A quick on-the-air check 
with the station at the other end can some- 
times be used to determine which antenna 
should be used in transmitting. 

For amateurs living in apartments or con- 
dominiums where no (outside) antennas are 
allowed, systems with gain as compared to a 
dipole are possible. NF0R has had antenna 
systems in the attic of his condominium. One 
of these consisted of two equal lengths of 
aluminum foil fed with tuned feeders made 



out of a good grade of twinlead. Another of 
his antennas was a tuned doublet with the 
ends of the wires bent around to fit the avail- 
able space, NF0R has worked into Australia 
with 5 Watts of rf output using one of his attic 
antennas. 

You should try out many different antenna 
systems until you Find ones that will work 
well in your particular location. Gel them up 
in the air as high as possible! I hope that this 
article will help you design, build T and use the 
best QRP antenna farm that your space will 
permit. ■ 

References 

1. Doug DeMaw W1FB, "Some Words 
About Antennas," QRP Notebook, ARRL 

2. Adrian Weiss K8EEG/W0RSP, "Antenna 
Capabilities: Notes for Novices/' The Joy of 
QRP, Strategy for Success, Milliwatt Books, 
833 Duke Street #83, Vermillion SD 57069. 

3. William I Orr W6SAI and Stuart Cowan 
W2LX, "A Universal H*F Antenna System. 
Simple Low-Cost Wire Antennas for Radio 
Amateurs, Radio Publications, Inc., Box 149, 
Wilton CT 06897 (1972). 

4. Or and Cowan t Ail About Cubical Quad 
Antennas (2nd edition). 

5. Wayne Overbeck N6NB, "Quads Vs. 
Yagis Revisited/' Ham Radio, May, t979. 

6. "Long Wire Antennas," ARRL Antenna 
Book (13lh and T4th editions). 

7. Edward M, Noll W3FCU 73 Dipole and 
Long-Wire Antennas and 73 Vertical Beam 
and Triangle Antennas. 




the- 

HAM STATION 

P.O. Box 4405 

220 N. Fulton Ave. 
Evansville, IN 47710 

Store Hours 

MON-FRI:9AM-6PM 

SAT: SAM - 3PM 

CENTRAL TIME 

SEND SAS1 FOR NEW 4 USED SHEETS 

WARRANTY SERVICE CENTER FOP: 

ICOW. YA6SU , TEN-TEC 



TERMS 
Prices Do Not Include Shipping. 

Prfce and Availability Subject Id 

Cbanpt Without Notice 

H art On ion Shipped The Sana Day 

COD 1 ! 






TPT 



TEN- 



PARAGON 




FT-707 

» HF/VHF/UHF Base Station 

• Plug-in Modules for 
6m, 2m, 440 MHz 

• Loaded with Features 
$ SPECIAL PRICES 

FT 23 R with DTMF Keypad 

• Mini 2 meter 
•2woropt.5w 

• 10 memories 

• memory and band scan 




General Coverage HF Transceiver 
Rec. 100 kHz-29.999 MHz 

TR 1.6MHz-29.999MHz 
Microprocessor Controlled 
Digital PPL Synthesizer, 10Hz 

Resolution 

62 High Capacity Memories 
Dual Built-in VFO'a 
American Made 



IC^2AT 



• Pocket-Sized 
2 Meter HT 

• TX-140-150 MHz, 
RC 139-174 MHz 

• 10 Memories and 
a LCD Readout 

S SPECIAL PRICE $ 



WELZ 




rfconoept/ 



VHF/UHF 
AMPS 



High VSWR and Overdrive Protection 

5 Year Warranty, 6 Months on RF 

Transistors 

All Units have GaAsFET Receive 

Pre amps 








Power Maters 
• Large Selection of Meters 
Always on Hand 
S SPECIAL PRICES 



IC-735 

• Most Compact and Advanced 
Full-Featured HF Transceiver 
on the Market. 
S SPECIAL PRICES 



DISCOUNTS ON RIGS AND ACCESSORIES FROM: aea.arrualinco, alliance, alpha-delta, 

AMECO, AMERITRON, AMP SUPPLY, ANTENNA SPECIALISTS, ASTRON, BENCHER, BUTTERNUT, B & W, CSI, 
CALLBOOK, CUSHCRAFT, DAIWA, DIAMOND, ENCOMM, HAL, HEIL, HUSTLER, I COM, KDK, KANTRONICS, KENPRO, 
LARSEN, MFJ, MlCROLOG r MIRAGE/KLM, NYE, PALOMAR, RF CONCEPTS, ROHN, SANTEC, SHURE, TE SYSTEMS, 
TELEX/HYG AIN, TEN-TEC, TOKYO HY-POWER, VIBROPLEX, W2AU BALUNS, WELZ, YAESU 



For Orders and Price Checks Call 800-523-7731 



Indiana and Information 
Call 1-81 2-422-0231 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • Aprif, 1987 37 



— 



Lawrence £, Mocionskt WAlAjQ 
303 South Vermont A venue 
Roxal Oak Ml 48067 



The Cellular 
Phony Antenna 



Okay, okay, it's a little bit vain to want a 
two-meter mobile antenna that looks like it f s hooked 
up to a cellular phone — but this way you save $1200. 



If you live in a U.S. metropolitan area, 
you've probably heard of "cellular tele- 
phone." Most cars that have cellular tele- 
phones sport a small black antenna with a 
"curly Q" phasing coil in the center. Mobile 
phones have been around for years, but this 
funny little antenna has become a status sym- 
bol. "Yuppie phone' is its nickname around 
these parts. 

Well. DO need to fret. No need to spend 
SI. 200 for a cellular telephone- Your trusty 
2-meter rig has been autopatching you for 
years. At the local 2- way shop. I found out 
that a couple of antennas have been sold to 
people who have nt> intentions of having a 
cellular phone, but simply want the antenna 
as a status symbol . Let "s combine the two and 
create the ham radio "cellular phony" anten- 
na thai vou can use on 2 meters. 



Advantages 

First, there is nothing like pulling up 
alongside a cellular-equipped Mercedes 
280SL with your pickup truck sporting the 
same cellular antenna. Ifs almost like beep- 
ers. Remember when only doctors had them? 
Now the janitorial services carry them. 

The second reason for sporting one of these 
antennas is that, if stolen, a cellular phone is 
difficult to get rid of since each one transmits 
a unique serial-number identification. As 
soon as the owner reports it stolen, the ID is 
locked out of the system and the phone is 
useless. Ham gear and CB rigs, however, can 
easily be used by someone else, so thieves 
will go after them. Also, some, if not most, 
of the cellular phones are locked into the 
mounting bracket very securely. Conse- 
quently, thieves will pass up the car with the 
cellular antenna. This makes the "cellular 
phony" antenna attractive to the 2-meter FM 
mobile user. 

Finally, this particular antenna detaches at 
its base, so going through the car wash 
doesn't damage it. And it is black, which 
makes it almost impossible to see at night. 
You should consider this antenna as your next 
2-meter FM mobile antenna. 

38 73 Amateur Radio ■ April, 1987 



Disadvantages 

Yes, there are a few minor ones, which I 
will discuss. E want the neophyte ham to be 
able to learn from this article as well as have 
fun. too. For you antenna purists, you'll 
claim less than unity gain. 

First, the antenna, being less than a quarter 
wave in length, actually becomes a loaded 
quarter wave, I do not have complex measur- 
ing gear to confirm my claim, but the surface 
area is virtually identical to a quarter-wave 
vertical. Its height is 16*\ which is a very 
good percentage of an 18-1/2* "full-length" 





Photo A. Vie cellular phony antenna. Total 
length is 1 6 inches from tip to end of base. 



quarter wave, After all. hams get good results 
with 8-foot mobile antennas on the low bands 
and with stubby ducks on VHF and UHF. 

Think of it in terms of an 80-meter vertical. 
which should be about 66 feet high. The ' 'cel- 
lular phony" antenna is the same percentage 
of a quarter wave that a 55- 1 /2-foot vertical is 
of the 66- Toot vertical. Many hams use anten- 
nas shorter than thai on 80 meters and have 
excellent results. 

Having a 16" high antenna on a mini van 
still gives you garage-door clearance. I have 
field-tested the antenna on distant repeaters, 
dead spots, and fringe areas and found no 
difference from a quarter- wave antenna. 

The second problem is swr bandwidth, I 
found 1,4:1 swr at 144.00 and 148,00 MHz. 
wiih 1.2:1 at center band. Again, for you 
antenna purists, it isn't perfect, but it is total- 
ly acceptable. 

Other antennas I have used are flatter and 
have greater bandwidth. The reason for this 
is that a loaded shortened antenna will ex- 
hibit narrower bandwith than a full quar- 
ter wave, The antenna did not exhibit a 1 ; J 
"perfect" match because shortened antennas 
exhibit a lower feed point impedance; when 
led with 50-Ohm coax they cause standing 
waves at the transmitter. With 1.4 on the 
band edges and 1.2 at center frequency, 
building a matching device is just not worth 
the trouble - 

Finally, for a couple of dollars , you can 
buy a BNC adapter, which allows use of the 
antenna on most HTs. There also are adapters 
available for Antenna Specialists and Mo- 
torola bases if you currently are using one of 
those but wish to 'upgrade" to a cellular 
phony antenna. 

Mounting the Antenna 

As you can see from the picture, this anten- 
na is roof-mounted, A 3 hole must be 
drilled into the roof using a circular hole sau . 
which can be purchased at the local hardware 
store for about $6. OR A Electronics (20120 
Plummer Street, PO Box 4029. Chats worth 
CA 91313: 800-423-5336) also offers a 



trunk-lip mount and an interesting new win- 
dow mount that clips onto the top of a rolled- 
down window and is rolled into place when 
the window is closed. 

The antenna has a TNC connector at its 
base. To adjust the antenna rod, loosen the 
Allen seiscrew (located at the top of the con- 
nector) to remove the antenna, and then 
shorten the antenna to the required frequen- 
cy, I had to remove about an inch from the 
antenna. This may vary in your application, 
due to such variables as type of mount or 
mounting position on the vehicle. 

Pruning the Antenna 

The om-of-the-box starting point showed 
the lowest swr at 142 MHz. That means that 
virtually whatever variation you choose, you 
should be able to prune the antenna to fre- 
quency, Like other quarter- wave antennas, a 
1/4" cut resulted in moving the lowest swf 
higher by I MHz. After mounting the anten- 
na, simply tune it b\ pruning it to obtain the 
lowest swr at 146,00 MHz. By using a syn- 
thesized rig, you can make plots of frequency 
versus swr and watch the antenna fall into 
place. 

The best way to prune the antenna is to 
carefully scrape the black plastic coating off 
the antenna rod with a knife so that the Allen 
screw makes good connection with the rod. 
Use a triangular file to make a groove around 
the bare antenna rod, then snap the excess rod 
off with a pair of pliers. Reinstall the antenna 
rod on the TNC connector and tighten the 



Parts List 



Item 

High-end cellular 
antenna mast 
Cellular antenna mount 



Ceilufar trunk-ltp mount 



Part Number 

CMR-488 



CMR-MT-311 10.75 



Cellular window mount 



Antenna adapter 



Antenna adapter 
Adapter BNC to TNC 
Conventional PL-259 connector 
Reducer for RG-58 coax 



Description 

Black polynoxo finish, for use with 
any CMR series mounts or adapters 
Standard 3/4" note mount with t$ 
feet of RG-58 coax T low-profile black 
finish. Accepts all CMR-type antennas 
Adjustable angle design, made of CMR-MT-540 
stainless steel in black polynoxo fin- 
ish. Comes with 16 feet of RG-58 
cable. Accepts all CMR-type antennas 
Comes with 1 6 feet of RG*5S cable- 
Accepts all CMR-type antennas 
Antenna Specialist mount to 
CMR antenna 

Motorola mount to CMR antenna 
For mounting antenna on HTs 



Price 

$19.00 



18.00 



CMR-MT-688 


2360 


ASA85 


5.00 


MTA94 


5.50 


TNC98 


1,80 


PL259 


1.10 


UG175 


.40 



Allen setscrcw. Now check your swr and 
repeat the process if necessary , 

My finished antenna measured exactly 16 
inches from the tip to the bottom of the TNC 
connector after pruning, and the lowest swr 
occurred at 145.75 MHz. F also tried the 
antenna on the440-MH/ hand: The swr was 
about 1.3:1 across 440 to 450 MHz — not a\ 
good a performance as [ would have liked, I 
suspect a high angle of radiation, but never- 
theless the antenna can be used on 440 for 
local or emergency communications. 







Parts 

I bought the antenna (called the 'hiiih-cnd 
cellular antenna mast*^ fromQRA Electron- 
ics. Other cellular antennas mav not work 

■ 

because different manufacturers vary their 
designs. In addition to the antenna, you'll 
need a base or an adapter. The three types of 
base* mentioned earlier are listed in the parts 
list along with the three adapters available. 
Finally, you II need a PL-259 connector and a 
UG-174 reducer for the RCi-58 cable, if you 
don't all ready have them in your junk box. ■ 



the Short Wave Listener for 




RECEPTION OF MORSE CODE & 
RADIO TELETYPE SIGNALS. 



Plug the SWL cartridge into your Commodore 4I 64" Expansion Port t connect 

shortwave radio and you'll be watching text readout from weather stations, 

news services, ships and HAM radio operators all over the world. A whole 

new use for your home computer. The SWL contains both program in 

ROM and radio interface circuit to copy Morse code and all 

speeds/shifts of radio teletype. Plus the on screen tuning 

indicators mean you never have to take your eyes off the video 

for perfect tuning. Housed in a small 3* x 2*1/2" x 7/8" >^ ^ 

enclosure, with speaker in/out and practice hand key v^ sy^ 

jacks, it needs no other computer connection or ^/x^ »^P 

power supply. Unshift on space, word wrap v^oft * a ^ 

around, real time clock, and keyword or 

manual printer control for permanent 

paper copy, so that you won't miss a 



a N \e>- 






v^\ 



^ 



K ^ MORSE CODE 
THE RIGHT WAY 
WITH THE 

Morse Coach . 



$ 



4995 



single bit of the action. For about 
the price of another "Pac-Zapper" 
game, you can tie mto the 
exciting world of digital 
communication with 
the Microlog SWL 

S 



s 



64 



rf* 



A complete Morse code tutor in a conveni- 
ent plug-in cartridge for your Commodore 
lb 64." The Morse Coach means business. lt T s 
not a toy program or a simple random code gen- 
erator. Originally developed jointly by Microiog and 
several government agencies experienced in Morse in- 
struction. Four years of extensive service prove it's the 
quickest way to Morse proftciency.The method works! You start from absolutely no 
knowledge of Morse, progress through the alphanumeric symbols, and on to any speed 
desired. The "alphabet" part of the program introduces new characters and plots the progress 
a bar-chart. The speed/test section correlates the input, analyzes mistakes and provides a 
printout of the analysis/test results on your Commodore screen or printer. As a bonus, it also boosts 
typing skill. You've never seen any tape or program do that! In fact, there's never been a system so 
thorough, so efficient and so effective as the Microlog Morse Coach. 



on 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 39 



M 



M 



Danny J. Conner KD5UJ 
123 Mts Amis 
CarencroLA 70520 



Weatherproofed 

Antennas 



KD5UJ shows you how to keep 
the elements out of your elements. 



M~ ost amateurs experience recurring 
problems with their antenna systems. 
Every summer most of us are pulling our 
antennas down because they're not working 
properly. By following the procedure which 
follows, you can eliminate this yearly ritual. 

Where I work, technicians provide com- 
munications for the oil industry both on- and 
offshore. It's not unusual for an antenna sys- 
tem that we put out on an offshore platform to 
operate successfully for more than three 
years without requiring any maintenance* 

These repair/installation instructions as- 
sume that you f re working on an aluminum 
antenna that requires assembly, such as a 
beam or a vertical, (Some of these sugges- 
tions wilt be helpful when working with wire 
antennas also.) If you're dealing with a new 
install at ion, the first thing you need to do is 
install the connector on the feedline. Since 
most amateur antennas require UHF connec- 
tors and most amateurs use coaxial cable, 
your installation will make use of PL-259 
connectors. 

Strip 1-1/8" of outer insulation off the ca- 
ble (see Fig. I), being carefttl not to nick the 
braid. Tin the braid, but don't overheat it. 
Overheating will make the insulation bubble 
out, making soldering to the connector diffi- 
cult. After it is cool to the touch, 

use a sharp knife and strip the 
braid and inner insulation off, 
leaving approximately 3/8* of 
braid exposed. Be careful not to 
nick the center conductor. Tin the 
center conductor and slide the 
coupling ring onto the cable. 
Screw the connector body onto 
the cable, being careful not to 
damage the outer tabulation. 

At this point, trim the center 
conductor even with the end of 
the connector body. If your con- 
nector body is chrome -plated, 
use a knife to scrape around each 
hole to get a smooth solder flow. 
If it's silver-plated (dull silver), 
scraping Isn't necessary. 

Solder the braid to the connec- 
tor body through the holes on the 
connector body. (Be sure solder 
drops through the holes.) Alter 

40 73 Amateur Radio * April, t987 



the connector cools, solder the center con- 
ductor to the connector body * Use an ohmme- 
ter on its highest scale (R x 10,000 or higher) 
to ensure that no continuity exists between the 
center conductor and the shield* 

If you are repairing an existing installation, 
perform the resistance check on your feedline 
to determine if replacement is necessary. 
Make sure both ends of the feedline are dis- 
connected prior to performing the check. 

If you're rebuilding an antenna, you will 
need some 200-grit wet/dry sandpaper to 
clean off the corrosion. For a good electri- 
cal connection take extra care where sec- 
tions of the antenna connect. Soak all hard- 
ware in WD40 and clean it with a wire brush. 
Replace any pieces that show excessive 
corrosion. 

After cleaning the old antenna, or prior to 
putting the new one together, you will need to 
protect it from corrosion {and from icing 
over, for those living in the winter wonder- 
Lands). To do this, saturate the antenna with 
CRC 2-26 or another similar product and 
allow it to dry for about an hour prior to 
assembly. After assembling the antenna, re- 
spray it liberally with the CRC 2-26. 

The next step is by far the most important. 
This is where most antenna failures occur— 



r ft 



*t 




* itt"i 






_ W J M » . ■ 



£er*pe 



Fig r I. Installation of a PL-259 connector. 



connecting the feedline to the antenna. If you 
are using UHF connectors (PL-259, SO 
239), then you need to get a tube of clear (not 
white) silicone heat-sink compound (Z5 com- 
pound). Fill the hole in the female side of the 
connector with this compound. 

Screw on the male side of the connector 
until it's hand tight. Then use a pair of chan- 
nel-lock pliers to turn the connector an extra 
1/4 turn. Be careful, since you can damage 
the connector by over-torquing. If you are 
using N -style connectors, do not put silicone 
in them ! They have no free space inside them, 
so using silicone can cause damage or distor- 
tion. Clean any excess silicone off the cable 
and connector. 

After connecting the feedline to the anten- 
na, you will need to waterproof it Start with a 
good-quality electrical tape such as Scotch 
88T. Tape the connector, overlapping the 
layers at least 50 percent of the tape thick- 
ness, and continue taping down the cable 
approximately 4-6 inches past the connector. 
Next, liberally coat the taped connector 
with Scotch Kote 7 *— don't use commercial 
antenna wrap, as it is messy and hard to 
apply and you can't be sure there are no 
cracks or air bubbles in it. Allow the Scotch 
Kote to dry about 10-15 minutes, then re- 
tape the connector and again 
coat it with the Scotch Kote. This 
substance won't come off* and 
the better you tape and Scotch 
Kote your antenna, the longer it 
will last. 

If you're building wire anten- 
nas, you should tape and Scotch 
Kote the point where your feed- 
linc connects to the legs of the 
dipole, vee f orsloper. 

After mounting or remounting 
your antenna, you should be able 
to sit back and enjoy your antenna 
stem. The only maintenance I 
\ would suggest, for those whose 

J installations permit, would be to 

liberally spray the antenna with 
CRC 2-26 approximately every 
six months, This will ensure pro- 
tection from corrosion and help 
maintain electrical continuity be- 
tween the sections. ■ 




RAMSEY ELECTRONICS 






INCLUDES 2 HOOK-ON PROBES 5 3bo.OU 

20 MHz DUAL TRACE 

Features com^nentiestmgci? coil tor resists eapacao 
(Jig ita I c i rcu lis anrf d lodes— TV sy nc tiiler— h ^*> sensi liv ity— 
Zaais— XV mode— oaUHn calibrator— 5X hon/ontai magrulier 



INCLUDES 2 HOOK-ON PROBtS *499.95 

35 MHz DUAL TRACE 

wide frequency band widtn— optimal sensitivity — d&tayfld 
mgg^mgsweep-'tiuidoff— ALT tugger— single sweep TVsynt 
5X magnification X Y of XYZ opef at ion HF^ LF noise reduction 



I7T 4M 

INCLUDES 2 HOOK ON PROBES 449-90 

15 MHz DUAL TRACE PORTABLE 

Field/beiichappiications-bujli-ir>cft3fQer and battery pack 
— up to2 hour soperai ion per charge -5* horizontal 
n>doni!itat^on— riign of ^hniess Ch? — licnt paneltr ace fotatoi 



RAMSEY OSCILLOSCOPES 



AN Ramsey Qscilloscopesfealure unsurpassed quality at an 
unbeatable pr tee Of heavy duty construction, they are suitable 
for hobby, service and production applications 

" Add an additional $1 OjOO for each anil for shipping 



MODEL 


BANDWIDTH 


N TRACES 


CRI SIZE 


VERTICAL 
SENSITIVITY 


MAXIMUM 
TRIG FREQ 


USEABLE 

MAXIMUM 

BANDWIDTH 


2200 


#}MH," 


m 


8x10CM 


SfflV pet div 


35 MH/ 


3DMH2 


2500 


15 MH/ 


m 


3.5 men 


2 iiiV per rjiv 


30 M-hV 


25 MHz 


3500 


35 MHz 


m 


fS»!OCM 


imVptr a iv 


50 MH/ 


60 MHz 

i ■ 



Ail incUt high omMr 1:1 i&i tuti tn prate*, inttrucian/fctrvici annul «ith utanutjc ind 



lfff*ul 1 far nirtiKjf 



-100 COUNTER CT-707 DIGIT 525 MHz CT-909 DIGIT 600 MHz CT-508 DIGIT 600 MHz CT-1259 0IGIT 1 2GH2 




5119.95 



ACAEklPftlMCHIKl 



s 139.95 






AC&B4FTU 



si 69.95 



it UtfTEl 



s 189.95 



ICUV1U 



* 189.95 H?-""" 



kDiPTEP 



MINI 100 



CT-70 



CT-90 



CT-50 



CI -125 



WITMOV 1 
OPTION 



mOHMSt 



1-500 MK 



2D H;- 560 MHz 



10 H.' WXJ MH/ 



5H/-60GMKZ 



IQHs-lfttiH/ 



xjru-ea 



S£MSITI¥1TI 



Less Than AOmv 



SOmvlo 150 Bilk? 



TOmv To 150 MH/ 
iStfiiw fiiTOUMH/ 



L£SSTHAN25n k 



25mvf'UMH2 

1amv*S»MH/ 

VDinv^-BQDUHz 



v.. Is QOINi 



tPPM 



ffH 



PPM 



,...• 



1PPM 



oiPrti 



100 H/ IKHr 



1H/. mt T00H7 



U THz 1H/, WMz 



THZ ' ! 



01KZ Ml WHf 



TH/ Itu <*4* 



M5.95 



139.95 
16995 

109 95 
189 95 



229.90 



RAMSEY FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



Ramsey Electronics has been manufaciui ing electronic 
test gear for over 10 years and is recoon ized for lab qual- 
ity products at breakthrough prices. Our frequency coun- 
ters have features and capabilities of counters costing 
twice as much. 




RAMSEY D-4100 
COMPACT 
DIGITAL 
MULTITESTER 



$2495 

lEfUtadsjud 




Qjmpaci sired rekaoif ily and accui acy 
This LCD digital mult i teller easily tits m 
your pocket you can taiceil anywhere It 
features full overtoad pi orettion • 3 1 
d>3it LCD readout • recessed tnpuljacfts 

* safely probes * diode check JunciiGfl 

• 2000 nours Qanury life 



RAMSEY 0-5100 
HANDHELD DIGITAL 
AUTORANGING 
METER 

•49.95 

Include a. Pr naes 
I tear Warranty 



Provides distinctive audible chirp afiei 
contact lias been made and metei reading 
hassiabifized Has TOUCH HOLD feature 
to alto* readings to be lodged or referred 
to before making the ne*t reading Up Id 
10 AMP current capability and a continuity 
function which Deeps on zero Ohms. 



BRUAU**NI HI 




$4495 

AimlilLlnflrL 

ffl-2W: 





$6995 

wired 

Ph/ Kir $49,95 



SQ995 

AC, 



PR-2 COUNTER PREAMP 

I Kb PR 2 is ideal lot measui Ing weaksignals 
irpm TO to 1,000 MHz • flat 25 db gam « BNC 
connectors * great lor sniffing RF » ideal 
receiverrTVpreanip 

PS-2 AUDIO MULTIPLIER 

The PS 2 is handy for nigh resolution aut)>o 
resolution measurements multiplies Up in 
frequency • great Tor PL lone measurements 
• multiples by 10 or IDC • Q.D1 Hz lesoluliun 
& buill-in signal pre-amp/curtdilioner 

PS IOB I GHz PRESCALER 

E blends the range of your present counter to 
1 GHr * 2 stage pred nip * divide by 1000 cir 

y • supei sensitive (5Q my typical I • 
BNC LOflftecloi s • 1 GHz in 1 MHz out • 
drives any counte 1 



MINI KITS-EASY TO ASSEMBLE-FUN TO USE- FOR BEGINNERS, STUDENTS AND PROS 




TO* I MCODt A 



jqi neyuufcon tw.'t [htlui liy inHtth 

Torn. I. 

.11 !> I u Evolti 

Su.«lb 



. 1 l|i 



4DViTT2mlf 
PWNAHP 

' COrliptlttMft 

$22.95 

e,95 



HA I JUWi/W j.'m.ii'ir 

M' ' RjF wjised I -H r«Jay kil 



COL QR ORGAN 

Stenkaccone^^J 

•nlh. 
3fy<dH Q| jiBi f i*W 

'■J JOOW 

jii rmvAC 

ml 1 k.i $8.95 



VDICt ACT IVA1 LU 
SW1CH 



ncordi pwnv «tf»'W 

9VUC 

VS-1W1 

S6.95 



VI Ota MOO LI LA TOR 

Com«rt» any I V to *0eo nwotof Si^m 

:-' jtnt n,riiWe cwr uv # t Hutu m > e>V 



S795 



elor 



!■■' 



name tUiUyefl tuitions 
YMiiriiiN(||j.,!iu H i kgnts 

RUK. his In IhVfJllE 



hi 



$2,95 



l^ltlViHSAl TIMER 

.inrM- 



I 

FdfiQeolfiaM 
ti iqiktrtih 



1 
.1 



^U.3J 



MAD BLAST I H 

: 1.AILJ a. a ^njl 

, 
Ting ' 1 ncJ Can 

t ...|, U| tO •■ A I' ' 
USHILlJtUJUSilMlli'i HlHIJi 

uoBbvix: 

M£ im $4.95 



WHiSPtftL*Hl 

— 

MJw {pCA> faS Mtf4» 



d litHAytti bm' 

ijI'lT I Ml I, 

Imb Uiitn *n A" t 
ilOV« 

.. i«,i S6,95 




MIRE 

T 4»N^fi5upTu JAJlfi 
^irFAJbTMC 
wi|l¥P* 

hunsiiu jiuyv i r , 

1 •■ 

miktitnuiiu !."i 



FM 1 k.i 
rv 



$3.95 
$4.95 



ilRLH 

- A * * , A 

nHrriipsjihB> 
',:n,l.ilrtMKj! ST,' 1 

VA--3Q 




B | rt * I*\,II Hf^H OvKpH UV ■ 

p»ft "fan <• bfc*r U*«l 

■ ' , 1 i,::j [1 Jti f , 

cii as general 

■ umpliltBi in l?W 

Ml . u„Ul.J r l-ll.i 1l.i 

., -nil fl 4b iH 1 1 



$595 



QOMt TIMEBJLSE 

fy»a«^61nX 

ik 4. Aii $5,50 
S9.95 





TELEPHONE 
TRANSPUTER 

■ rtriTh prol 

. ■ ' ' j'i-_ k . I ■ ' 

• 



tMMEi 

fctWn-^tdfehinir*f»f« 
OitmfiMMWiifiear 
idiio* Me bwIi onwit 

Kb IKII 

$14.95 



IMHtGiMLfl 

Fomuul in,niMiivrtlKnK. 
aJ hobby ifNptiiPirienla 
lion Fill M11 ;JfH!d!;u[>ti - 
iwH-L'tiY nfiKicHtvfli 
■'Mi ' D'-'hH siiii%»ikVni|i 

10 71AM/ if uili^iiScff 

CtftutfO*Lrttu; ^Omw 

aHfitf fiOfie iwer 
«gcr^wn 6n iiarrivir 

BidiMti cotnatti^ 

. ■ 
Ndogj i'jct<Lih- 11 



minii 



S 14.95 




fMMHl 
MIKE 



Afupn rwgmperlurmtiiiH 
hMwif Hess niihukd 1 

li>ll,rli!^, .iLlLlljltlM^llitl 

up lu 300 vaids wilh 

.Hly 
insolmbt* 

ltei«s 

0V«MBIUU]4VA*At 
1-tlIHfr $14.95 

* W JWrnmiinJ hi\\:H 




19.95 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 
Telescopic whip amenns — BNCplug S 8.95 

High impedance probe, light loading 1 6.95 

Low pass probe, audio use 16.95 

Direct probe, general purpose use 1 3.95 



1 iinxif arm m mam 1 j ■ Wfl 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-586-3950 

TELEX 466735 RAMSEY CI 
FAX 716-586-4754 



HIM& * Htnlid ion cuarimitfi • tiMiiH tar Id iivi: il nol p luttd. 
tmnutw^mtimmtarT^ng ■ iM^ilir i l i >pp ii n»ibinnMcim 
■ir^if tip fff-twifi nH "^ 1 frTr f r*-T Jt * r —**'T* M 
fSm m UH ^r I " mm* air Its Off M II a • it mtfMfci Mi P* 
tAtat tii * 90 % pw**WTioT| on i« hH - I far pim * taUr 



RAMSETUECmONICSINC 
2575BairUHrJ Dapt. 73 
Penfieid.N.r. 14526 



."34 



Brad Thompson 
77 WaUham Street 

Maynard MA 01754 



Tube Terror 



Will the vacuum tube thermionic generator 
change the world as we know it? Probably not 



The chill of the gritly concrete floor 
against die side of my face roused me 10 
consciousness, I was, lying, 1 gradually real- 
ized, on my side in a dimly lit place. 

My knuckles brushed against metal as 
I sat up. An arm's reach away, a steel 
beam protruded vertically from the floor. 
A dust-coated cardboard carton sat next to 
the beam. 

I looked around. I was in a warehouse, 
I discovered, the largest warehouse 1 had 
ever seen. The aisle f was in vanished in the 
dimly lit distance, bounded on eilher side by 
row after row of cartons resting on steel 
shelving. 

1 looked up. The nearby steel beam went 
up and up, disappearing into a smoky 
haze- I couldn't see the ceiling, the source of 
the dim light, or the tops of the stacks of 
canons. 

There was writing on the cartons, I no- 
ticed. The closest one read "IB3-GT"; 
across the aisle, another carton read "1D5- 
GT." Vacuum tubes? What was 1 doing in a 
warehouse lull of vacuum tubes? 

I became aware of a shadowy, robed figure 
standing a few yards away. % 'Who arc you?" 
I muttered, "And what am I doing here?" 

The figure lilted an arm and a bony hand 
protruded from the sleeve of the robe, "I am 
the Spirit Of Radio and you are in the Ware- 
house Of Tubes Past- Before you can leave, 
you must find an application for every tube in 
the warehouse," 

A rising tide of panic gripped me. "You 




can't be serious— nobody designs with tubes 
these days!" 

*"You must or you will never leave/ the 
spectral figure whispered. The hood fell 
away and, instead of a face, I saw the screen 
of a cathode-ray tube bearing the image of 
Lee DeForest, inventor of the triode. 



"Before you can 
leave, you must 
find an application 
for every tube in 
the warehouse/' 



I gasped and ran— down the aisle past the 
2CY5s. the 3V4s, the 5U4-GBs, the 6A7s— 
chased by the shadowy figure. A protruding 
carton of 6L6s tripped me and I fell head- 
long . , , the floor melted beneath me .... . . 

1 woke up on the sofa, an opened copy of 
the 1957 RCA Tube Manual resting on my 
chest. It was just a bad dream* 

* * * * * 

What follows is probably the last con- 
ceivable application of the vacuum tube. 

CertainK . all the obvious uses for tubes 
have been exploited. Why, once upon a 
time, clever people built transmitters and 




receivers and even computers using vacuum 
tubes! 

But it occurred to me that a tube is more 
than just an amplifier, an oscillator, or a 
rectifier. It's also a power source. 

A number of years ago, a device called the 
"thermionic converter* was invented. It 
consisted of a source of electrons and a col- 
lector, The electron source was made of an 
element thai "boiled off electrons when 
heat was applied. The collector gathered the 
electrons and delivered them to the circuit to 
be powered. 

The heat source, as I recall, could be any- 
thing from a solar collector to waste heat 
from an industrial engine as long as the 
source's temperature was 800 degrees Kelvin 
(or greater] for reasons of efficiency. 

Okay, so what's a vacuum tube but a source 
of electrons and a collector, all neatly pack- 
aged in an easy-to-use form— with a built-in 
pilot light, even? 

J dragged out a carton of tubes and 
rummaged through them until I found a 6W4- 
GT, a television damper diode. The trans- 
lonrter junk box yielded a U7-to-6J-volt 
filament transformer and, with the aid of 
some clip leads, I breadboarded the circuit 
of Fig, 1 4 

I wailed impatiently for the 6W4 to warm 
up. and attached a digital voltmeter, The 
open-circuit voltage deli% ? ered by the tube 
measured 3.35 volts polarized as shown 
(plate negative, cathode positive). Remem- 
ber, the tube's plate is acting as an elec- 











J_ J 


■a i~ 

1 ■*- 

1 * m* 




It: -|_, 
1 Ti^-m * 






II* v.- i_ fjf- ft 1 *■,*.*. 









Fig. /, The first circuit. 

42 73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 



Fig. 2, The second circuit— .0023% efficient. 



Fig, 5. The ac power-on delay circuit. 



rmn "collector" and hence has a negative 
charge. 

Under a 4,7k-Obm load, [he output voltage 
sagged to 0,47 volts, which corresponds to an 
output current of a smashing 100 microam- 
peres. Clearly, we're not going to put Boston 
Edison out of business! 

While the output from the 6W4 was pure 
direct current, the tube's internal impedance 
is quite high relative to a more conventional 
s»urce, and 60- Hertz noise pickup occurred 
vwth my clip-lead lashup. Capacitor CI acts 
as a noise bypass and reservoir capacitor. 

For my next experiment* I selected a pairof 
6AL5 duod lodes and connected the diode 
sections in series to obtain 3.2 volts open-cir- 
cuit (0.8 volts from each diode section* and 
I *J0 microamperes short -circuit current. Un- 
der a 19,2k-Ohm load, the circuit "s output 
voltages dropped to a measly 1-3 volt**. See 
Fig, 2 for the circuit schematic. 

No analysis of any power source would be 
complete without a look at the circuit's effi- 
ciency. One 6AL5 draws 0.3 Amperes of 
heater current at 6, 3 volts or 1 .89 Walts. Two 
6AL5s consume 3.78 Watts and deliver 88 
microwatts for an efficiency of, . -0.0023 
percent! 



"Two SAL 5s consume 

3. 78 Watts and 

deliver 88 microwatts 

for an efficiency of . , . 

0,0023 percent!" 



Is there any practical use for such a mi ma- 
cule power source? Fig. 3 shows one idea. 
The 6AX5-GT full -wave rectifier duodiode is 
powered from a switched ac power line. As 
the6AX5 warms up, its output voltage climbs 
until it exceeds the trigger voltage threshold 
(3,6 volts typical. 4.3 volts maximum) of one 
section of a 74C14 CMOS hex Schmiii trig- 
ger IC. 

The 74CI4's output is thus time-delayed 
from the initial application of ac to the 
6AX5's heater circuit. Under no-load condi- 
tions, the 6AX5 delivers approximately 5 
volts., and diode D 1 is incorporated to prevent 
overstressing U 1 in case a figuratively "hot* 
6AX5 is plugged in. If the reverse leakage 
current of Dl is excessive, you may wish to 
add a 1 -megohm resistor from the junction of 
Dl and CI to ground. 

If you'd tike to experiment further, try us- 
ing gridded tubes as thermionic power 
sources by tying all grids to the plate for 
maximum electron collection. See w r hat hap- 
pens when a grid is connected to the lube's 
cathode instead of the plate (excuse me. the 
collector). 

There you have it. Arguably, the "vacuum 
tube thermionic power source" is the world's 
least efficient generator. Keep it in mind, 
though, just in case you ever find yourself 
locked in a warehouse full of tubes with a 
shadowy robed figure. ■ 

When You Buy, Say 73' 




The RC-850 Repeater Controller . . . 

when only the best will do. 

With an RC-850 controller, your repeater becomes fully remote ty programmable ■* 
command codes, timers, autodial numbers, iD and tail messages . . . virtually every para- 
meter can be easily charged. Touch-Tone programming from your radio or the phone with 
synthesized voice confirmation. 

The patch supports local and radio-linked remote phone lines, so you can extend your 
patch coverage to match your RF coverage. Now you can have a full featured patch even 
if you can't get a phone line at your site, The 250 autodial slots meel everyone's needs, 
with up to 35 dkjil storage tor MCI Sprint 

The easy-to-use mailbox lets you include phone numbers, times, or frequencies as 
parts of messages. And its so smart, it'll leave you a message if you miss a reverse patch 
or an alarm, 

Selective call capabilities range from two -tone to numeric display paging, so you'll 
always be avail able. And its voice response metering continuously stores low and high 
readings - so you can find out how cold it gets, how high the reflected power reads . , , and 
when. 

Individual user access codes, with call sign readback, give you secure access to 
selected functions to completely prevent horseplay. 

Advanced Computer Controls continues lo lead the way in advanced repeater technol- 
ogy, changing the face of amateur repeaters every day. ACC COnl rollers offer users, control 
operators, and site managers features and tools to make operation more convenient, useful, 
and FUN! 

The industry's top-of-the-line controller - for your repeater 




advanced 
computer 
controls, inc. 



^ 



2356 Walsh Avenue 
Santa Clara. CA 9505 1 

(40B) 727-3330 



ASSOCIATED RADIO 

8012 CONSER BOX 4327 
OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS 66204 



VISA-MC 
AMEX-DISC 

BUY — SELL — TRADE 

ALL BRANDS NEW AND RECONDITIONED 




WE'LL BUY YOUR EXTRA RIG 

OR ENTIRE STATION 
Call 91 3/381-59 

DISCOUNT PRICES 

SEND SS FOR CATALOG 
AND WHOLESALE LIST 



p . 



>■' 



73 Amateur Radio * April. 1987 43 



Rirh Sfiebel W6APZ 
840 Tiilisman Drive 
Palo Alto CA 94303 



The Ducky Doctor 

Heat-shrink tubing gives you 
a flexible fix for your cracked rubber ducky. 



With 144-, 220-, and 440-MHz handie- 
talkies enjoying high popularity, the 
rubber-ducky antenna is much in demand. At 
a recent local ham flea market, at least half 
the hams there had an HT— either clipped to 
the belt, hanging out ofa back pocket, tucked 
into a shirt pocket, or grasped in the hand. In 
all but the last position, the rubber ducky 
takes a lot of abuse as the wearer mo\ 
about. 

Now we all know that rubber duckies 
are flexible. One rubber-ducky vendor at 
the ilea market put a 90° bend in one duck> 
to demonstrate its Flexibility and ability to 
snap back to a vertical position. This is fine 



\ 







and good for new rubber duckies, but after 
several years the covering becomes brittle 
and can crack. 

My wiles (W6ANT) rubber ducky 
developed such a crack, and its ever- 
increasing size eventually caused some con- 
cern. By the time the crack had extended 
about one-half inch. I could see the innards of 
the ducky— a coil of wire wrapped on a foam 
plastic core. I was concerned about: H the 
rubber-ducky wire breaking with continued 
Hexing. 2) moisture getting inside and caus- 
ing a mismatch, and 3) the wire corroding 
because of exposure to sail air. 

To prevent these things from happening, I 
had to repair the crack in a way that would: I ) 



Photo A. the shrink-mbing fix is on tin* tow 

portion ofthtr rubber duck v. 

44 73 Amateur Radio ■ April, 1987 




Photo B. A stubby ducky with a shrink-tuhitj^fiw 



add strength to the rubber ducky, 2) keep 
moisture out. 3) protect the wire. 4) retain the 
flexibility of the rubber ducky, and 5) be a 
permanent fix. I knew from experience that 
electrical tape would not add enough 
strength — it wouldn't withstand the abuse a 
rubber ducky gets, Epoxy would seem to fit 
most of the requirements, but its not flexible 
and might crack and fall off with use. 

The solution was to use a permanent sleeve 
made of shrink tuhjng, a type of plastic tubing 
that shrinks when heat is applied to it. It is 
available at many electronics stores,, such as 
Radio Shack (#"278-1627) or Dick Smith 
Electronics. 

WbANT's rubber ducky with shrink tubing 
in place is shown in Photo A. The shrink 
tubing is seen as the extra covering on the 
lower pan of the rubber ducky. It realty 
blends in well with the original cover of the 
antenna. 

Making the Repair 

1) Measure the largest diameter of the rub- 
ber ducky over which the tube must slide. On 
my wife's rubber ducky, I slipped the tubing 
over the top, since that is smaller than the 
BNC connector, 

2) Buy a piece of shrink tubing just barely 
large enough to slip over this diameter. The 
tubing can shrink to approximately 50% of its 
original diameter. 

3) Cut ii piece of the tubing about one inch 
longer than is necessary to cover the crack 
(about one-half inch in each direction). 

4) Slip the tubing on the rubber ducky and 
center it over the crack. 

5) Apply heat to the shrink tubing. 

6) When cool, verify the tight fit and the 
added strength \wth flexibility- 

Applying heat is the trick) pan. Years ago. 
when 1 worked in a lab as a design engineer, I 
used a heal gun to shrink the tubing. A heat 
gun looks a hair dryer. When you "pull the 
trigger/' the element heats tip and a small but 
powerful fan blows hot air out the front. 



What did I have at home that would serve 
the same purpose? Why the XYL's hair 
dryer, of course. Forget it! After 15 minutes 
with the dryer on high, the tubing had not 
shrunk even one millimeter! The air was just 
not hot enough, 

I thought about using a match , which might 
work t but an open flame would be too uncon- 
trollable. One slip and the tubing and rubber 
ducky might start to burn. 

Finally, from my junk box I pulled an old 
heating element from an oven that I salvaged 
many moons ago. It was rated for 1 20 volts, 
so I attached a line cord and mounted the 
heater on a couple of metal shelf brackets to 
keep it from burning the workbench. As the 
element began to glow, 1 held the end of the 
rubber ducky with the shrink tubing about an 
inch from the glowing coil and rotated the 
ducky continuously. 

Rotation is very important— it allows you 
to shrink the tubing evenly while not over- 
heating the rubber ducky. Within minutes, 
the shrink tubing fit snugly against the ducky. 
I unplugged the heating coil and let the ducky 
cool about ten minutes. 

Lacking an old oven heating element* you 
could shrink the tubing over an element on an 
electric stove or hot plate. Be careful not to 
overheat the rest of the rubber ducky. The 
end near the connector gets the most bending* 
so most repairs will probably be at that end of 
the rubber ducky. 

Other Tixes and Uses 

The stubby ducky on my HT also 
developed a crack, I used the same tech- 
nique to fix it. The repaired stubby ducky 
is shown in Photo B. The shrink tubing half 
covers the knurled metal band, which is 
above the black plastic tube directly above 
the BNC connector. The BNC connector, as 
well as the short black tube, unscrews to 
mount i he 5/8- wave antenna that came 
with the stubby ducky. This made slipping 
the shrink tubing on easier than on the full- 
size rubber ducky. Even with this shrink 
tubing in place, the extent of the original rip 
is evident. 

5/8- wave and J/2-wave HT antennas have 
a flexible matching coil at the bottom. 
The technique described here could be 
used to repair the covering on the match- 
ing coil, if needed. For those who like to 
build their own antennas, covering the 
matching coil with heat-shrink tubing will 
provide protection and make the job look 
professional. 

Shrink tubing is available in different col- 
ors. You might even decide to color-code 
your rubber duckies— say, black for 2 me- 
ters, yellow for 1-1/4 meters, and red for 3/4 
meters. There would be no mistaking an ex- 
tended 440-MHz ducky for a 2 -meter rubber 
ducky if it had a color band of shrink tubing 
around the base or at the tip. 

The two repaired duckies have been in use 
for about a year with no noticeable difference 
in radiation characteristics or any mechanical 
problems, if you have an injured rubber 
ducky, this fix will have your antenna up and 
about in no time flat. ■ 



The RC-85 Repeater Controller . . . 
the affordable controller for any repeater, 

The RC-85 controller offers the high tech basics of repeater control. Of 
course, much of what we consider the "basics" aren't found anywhere else, at arty 
price. Remote programming lets you configure the operating characteristics of 
your repeater, and change them at any time - without a trip to the hill Non-volatile 
memory remembers your parameters, even after a power loss. 

Synthesized speech makes it easy for users to interact with the repeater. 
Commands are acknowledged, and information is available to users, through 
remotely programmable ID, tail and bulletin board messages. And since your 
repeater talks, it's friendly and fun to use. 

The patch includes ten emergency autodial numbers, and 190 user loadable 
autodial slots. With toll restrict, "cover tone", and more. 

The remote base capability lets you connect a transceiver to your repeater, 
for remotely commanded finking to other repeaters and simplex channels. With 
full frequency control! Frequency agile linking is invaluable in public service com- 
munications . 

There's even more . , . a talking s-meter so users can check how well they're 
getting into the repeater, a site alarm for security, remote control logic outputs 
for controlling other equipment at the site. 

There's never been a better time to upgrade your repeater system with 
ACC's products, unmatched in the industry in quality, sophistication, and perform 
mance. With well wmtten, llustrated eas* bo f ead manuals, training rapes- and 
telephone support. 

Please cat* or write now for ihe rest of the story on all our repeater products, 
including controllers, digital voice storage units, and other Touch-Tone control 
products. 

You'll be GLAD you did. 




advanced 
computer 
controls, inc. 



^t43 



2356 Walsh Avenue 
Santa Ciara C A 9505 T 

(408) 727-3330 







Measure Up With Coaxial Dynamics Model 

83000A RF Peak Reading Wattmeter 

ake a PEAK with Coaxial Dynamics "NEW" Model 83000A, designed 
to measure both FWC I power in CW 

J FM systems simply and quickly. 
Then with a "FLIP" of a switch, 
measure "PEAK POWER" in most 
AM, SSB or pulse systems. Our 
Model 83000A features a complete se 
lection of plug*in-elements plus a 2 

ear warranty. This makes the 
Model 83000A an investment worth 
looking at. So go ahead, take a 
"PEAK", you'll like "WATT" you seel 

Contact us tor your nearest autho- 
rized Coaxial Dynamics representa- 
tive or distributor in our world-wide 
sales network, 

COAXIAL 

DYNAMICS, 

INC. 





15210 Industrial Parkway 
Cleveland, Ohio 441 35 
216-267-2233 
1-800-COAX1AL 
Telex 984)630 

Service and Dependability, . . a Part of Every Product 




73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 45 



Peter Ferrand 

65 Atherton A vemw 

Nashua NH 03060 



Tuner Transformation 



Make your Heath SA-2500 antenna tuner truly automatic, 



While I haven't heard of any fingers 
getting worn oui from adjusting the 
dials of an antenna tuner, the three-handed 
balancing act it takes to get on the air is not 
something I look forward to. The Heath SA- 
2500 automatic antenna tuner looked like the 
answer to more than 20 years of trying to use 
one none-ioo-optimized antenna for all HF 
bands. Just put a little power into it and let it 
find its own match. 

Almost! 

Probably to limit the already very complex 
circuitry, the SA-2500, although equipped 
with a motor to drive the rotary inductor, 
requires you to set up to 18 different preset 
points on that coil, nominally two for each 
band. Unlike some other designs* the tuner 
does not use these presets as a starting point to 
find the optimum amount of inductance: the 
designers have relied on turning only the ca- 
pacitors to find a match. 

Although theoretically capable of match- 
ing nearly anything with its high-pass- fil- 
ter type circuit* the SA-2500 has a tuning 
range that is quite limited once a preset has 
been set. And for absolutely no reason I can 
think of, Heath has chosen to mount the 1 8 
preset-control potentiometers on the main 
circuit board. You have to remove eight lit* 
lie screws from the top cabinet cover to get 
to them. 

Also, I can't understand why the circuit 
won't let you set the inductor manually and 
find the best match from there. If you go into 
automatic, the roller coil just spins back to the 
preset point, 

In the case of my wire antennas, 1 found 
that daily variations (hot and cold, ice on 
Lhe trees) were affecting the system so that 
the tuner could not get an adequate match. 
This was a real disappointment. Running 
a tuner without its top cover is poor prac- 
tice, and fiddling with those printed cir- 
cuit controls makes a mockery of the au- 
tomation electronics I spent a week as- 
sembling. 

46 73 Amateur Radio • Aprh\1987 



There are two obvious answers — cutting a 
trap-door in the top cover or outboard ing 
the potentiometer array. The first is pret- 
ty crude. While the second could actually 
be worked via lhe 9-pin connection on the 
back, the thought of a little box with nine 
pots to turn was a bit much to take. Then, too, 
there was the problem of how to w r atch D359, 
the LED that lights when you've matched the 
electronics with the roller inductor position* 



"Daily variations 

were affecting the 

system so that the 

tuner could not get an 

adequate match/' 



Several hours of staring at the schematic 
and the manual's none-too-clear explanation 
of the relevant circuit yielded an answer. By 
replacing a single fixed resistor with a remote 
potentiometer, I could vary the range of all 
the pots up or down, quickly and accurately, 
just like a vernier. This, of course, voids the 
warranty, but the unit can be restored to its 
original condition easily . 

Say the original setting for doing 40 meters 
on the rollers was 12. As modified, the re- 
mote potentiometer's value would be set to 
the same value as the original resistor, so the 
setting remains at 12. 

One fine day (probably the next day) you 
won't be able to get a match at that setting. A 
small adjustment of the remote pot will vary 
the setting up or down until things come into 
resonance. Now the first try will, of course, 
have to be experimental, but once you've 
done it a few times, it will be nearly as auto- 
matic as the tuner should have been. 

Another nice feature is that after you 



move the range of all the settings, setting 
things up on one band (at least in my case) 
brought all lhe other settings very close. I 
was using the same antenna (a small vee) on 
all bands, so you may not notice this with 
your setup. 

I would highly recommend using a 10- 
tum precision pot in this application for case 
of adjustment and reproducible settings. Us- 
ing the type with a shaft for a knob instead of 
the screwdriver-adjust type makes things 
much easier— and if s designed for heavier 
use. The one that I used (Bourns BP3540S-1- 
1K) costs about $14 p but flea markets and 
junk boxes are good sources since most peo- 
ple have little use for such pots, A Ik pot 
should be used. 

Similarly, the use of a turns-counting dial 
makes things much more convenient. This 
device is made to match the pots, and general- 
ly can be found at flea markets attached to 
some incomprehensible piece of junked test 
equipment . 

Remove resistor R452— it's the 220-Ohm 
resistor on the left edge of the main circuit 
board of the SA-2500, when looking at the 
unit from the front. Now set your 10-turn pot 
to 220 Ohms, using an ohmmeter. Attach a 
pair of shielded wires to the points where 
R452 used to be and run the wires out of the 
cabinet to your 10-turn pot— one wire to the 
wiper connection, the other to the pin I end. 
This would be pins I and 2 of the Bourns 
control mentioned before. 

Of course, you should ground the braid 
of the shielded wire near its end. If you 
don't have two-conductor shielded wire* use 
two pieces of RG-174/U and ground both 
shields. The length doesn't seem especially 
critical, but since you're apt to have a lot 
of rf floating around, try to keep it short. You 
might be able to figure out how to mount 
the pot on the from panel* but I couldn't — 
unless you want to sacrifice use of the anten- 
na switch* 

I found there is plenty of room between the 



multiple-pin connectors and the chassis for 
slipping wires. You may have to use normal 
RFI measures on the wire (fertile beads and 
capacitors), but I noticed no changes running 
the full legal limit. You also might w r ant to put 
the potentiometer in some kind of box to 
make it look nice- 

Setting the dial to something appropriate, 
such as 5 if if s a 1 -to- 10 scale, will give you a 
reasonable frame of reference. To match the 
resistance value, 2.2 also would be a good 
choice. 

And that's it. If you don't change anything, 
your settings will stay the same. You can 
override the preset when you need to and still 
preserve the automatic feature. When you do, 
remember to mm the dial slowly and keep an 
eye on the readout, since you don't— under 
any circumstances— want to let the inductor 
run against the stops. 

A Feu Notes 

While the manual doesn't specify it, com- 
munication with Heath indicates that the gray 
multi-conductor cable coming from the sen- 
sor assembly should be dressed away from 
the variable capacitors and placed flat against 
\hc rear panel. Otherwise, due to the very 
high voltages encountered, an arc can devel- 
op from the capacitor to the cable, with disas- 
trous results. 



"Using a coaxiafiy 
fed antenna 

is not what I cait 
a solution!'' 



Heath also suggests that turning the anten- 
na-selector switch be done with a sharp, 
snapping motion, due to the flexing in the 
16" shaft. Using a gradual motion may leave 
the selector switch set in some in-between 
position. 

Finally, high-power rf and solid-state elec* 
ironies don't always mix too well. In my 
case, I noticed that the tuner easily found a 
match at low power, but as soon as 1 switched 
to high power, the motors ran continuously. 
The Heath service consultant said he had 
heard about this before but could offer no 
solution. "Use a coaxially fed antenna' is 
not what I call a solution! 

The easiest answer is to let the tuner find 
the match at low power and then switch into 
manual mode. I was able to improve the 
grounding ibv using a resonant ground). %n 
the problem went away. I also improved 
the shielding by scraping away the paint 
around the cabinet screws wherever the two 
halves of the cabinet came into contact with 
the chassis. 

With these provisos in mind, if you're go- 
ing to be chasing DX up and down the fre- 
quencies, or even if you prefer just getting on 
the air to fiddling with knobs, the SA-2500 is 
a useful accessory at a price not much higher 
than ;i manual tuner. ■ 



"mien You Buy, Say 73 



r 




The Digital Voice Recorder 
. . . lets your repeater speak your mind. 

ACC's Digital Voice Recorder allows you \o remotely record your voice over the 
air, with digital storage in its huge memory array, PCM voice recording results in the 
highest possible fidelity, so that you sound like you. 

The voice mailbox gives your repeater users computer bulletm-board jike capability, 
from any radio with mic and Touch-Tone pad. W*lh messages stored tn voice, your 
users dont need special gear to enjoy the latest in communications technology, from 
anywhere, 

Your repeater's IDs and other messages can consist of remotely recorded DVR 
audK> tracks, Wh*ch can provide information to your users - about your system, club 
meetings, special events And you can make your repeater the fnendliest around, with 
holiday, birthday, and anniversary greetings. With its no compromise high quality PCM 
digifat audio processing, even famous celebrities can sound like they re at your repeater 
site 1 

The DVR connects easily to your RC-850 or RC-85 controller Or to your standalone 
repeater. And one DVR can support up to three repeaters, for a cost effective instal- 
lation. 

The Digital Voice Recorder is the neatest thing to happen to repeaters since ACC's 
repeater controllers. Request our audio demonstration tape, so you can hear for your- 
self. 



•*144 




advanced 
computer 
controls, inc. 



2356 Walsh Avenue 
Santa Clara, C A 95051 

(40*) 727-3330 



GET A BIRD'S EYE VIEW 

From GrafTrak II™ and your IBM* PC 



L985 Julg) is tbiee ^*J^ 

f roe* Hcran ^^ ^^~^J 


>*"* 




£?,.£ n 76. J u .\ryfl Q^tfj 




** tfto* e J- 




*J 




■> 


19633 feat acre** 
SSI Gr*fT>* Jl 




jT ¥ 



nftUHR fc£fl 



QSCfll? ifl -* j$e5 JA. |1 lfl:4n:U£ 



*.*. 



?Ciuti 



-H- 



z 



ntx* 



*u> 



DUE' 



Utt 



13* 



L0N 141. 7* u FW# l^.Sa?3 



Htf £9938 h* 



R*G £9571 b* ;c" 



eetc is; 



MP 



ELEU tl.7" 

USUI .3* 



Hn 



HOUSTON 



QSCW 11 



* 1965 JUL 1 i «3t44l 33 



w*yjT 



L0HD9+ 



QSO* 5 



- 3Qft JUL LI *4:u[:2»* 



OBS 






lK 



ZG«t 



OBS 



KT 



EEE3 



l:^t:M 



rout 



HELP 



LRT 
LON 



93.5* u 

!£45 hm 



ECHO 8 U 

FRO 143.6228 
DOP -26£8 Hz 
DfcFT -52S Hzn 



ELEU 
Dftflll 

4 



49.3* n 
5CT km 



{ C HO t ins 

fro tH^aeue 

POP -^3c Hi 
ftf-FT -1669 HZB 



eliu 
* ]. J I 



£0689 



GrafTrak M " pri ^ idr^ tedttme graphic di&p3ii> ul j llj| projection map uhi<.h moves undei the ^elected Said hit Sun Moon Star 
coverage circle and updates once per second Spherical projection views arid graphic vcrecn dumps to jn IHM \ pv*w Oki primer 
can also be produced He^uirc-s An IBM PC, POXT t PC/AT. or irue compatible, an IBM Ci'lor Graphics Monitor Adapter or irae 
compatible. 80U7 math coprocessor, rmmmimt B&K RAM wiA 51 ZK tecommended, DOS 2.0 or bdcr 4 and either two 360K floppy 
drives or one 36DK ni»pp> md one hard dnve 

SILICON EPHEMBKIS" provides tabuLv data tmrpuf lo the mum . pnnier. or ditl file for the followin| openfing modes I 
nhsarvsr to 16 ^alellifcot. lo itfwwvws to I satellite, wherduk for I ohservw 10 I v^iHhic window between J o tn erv eri *nd I 
saidhie, nse aod %ei nmes fur I saleifjic, rime tudertd nic and set tunes for 16 tMeiliin. Almanac for Sun and Moon. 16 ofacrvcrs 
to Stoi Moon, wholjk for I abiervcr to Moon window hetiieen 2 observers and Moon, whedule for J observer to Sun Requmrs 
either an IBM PC. H \ I i\ \T_ or true compatible, jnd IBM Monochrome or IBM Color^Graphics Mtmitor AJaptet or tune 
compatible. ^ o^ionaj 1087 tm*h corjnKCHor. 25nK RAM. DOS 2JQ or later, and one I60K flopp> A 

Each package includes SED. an editor program to construct and modify Sale IIjIc- Observer database Files These products can be 
run from a hard di<di and are noi copv protected 

GrafTrak II" ami SII.K UN EPHEMERIS" are priced al $119 95 each or $199.95 fcf both Texas rcMdenis add lata laa Order 
by check, money order, MasterCard, or VISA 

Sllkon Solurinns. Inc • PO Bo* 742546 - Houston. Telas 772742546 - (7I3> 661-8727 



IBM n ■ re|iiacm1 'iNkniMrd >■! II1M >. -irpmlHin 



ft 



* irHlln** II ind Nilimir tpkemeni iit \f\*> m*H, ul MKiM JldbtinnH. Ihc. 



73 Amateur Radio • April, T 987 47 



THE COMPLETE TEXT OF DOCKET 86-161 , THE FCC'S FINAL RULING ON NOVICE ENHANCEMENT 



1 On April t8, 1 986 in response to several pet i I ions tor rule making we adopted a Notice of 
Proposed Rule Making {5) FR 17074 May 3. i986HNovicet proposing to enhance the privi- 
leges authorized by the Novice amateur operator license The enhanced privileges would be 
in the HF 10 meter, VHF 1 25 meter and UHF 0.23 meter bands wrth transmitter peak 
envelope power maximums ut 200 watts, 25 watts and 5 watts respectively. We proposed ait 
authorized emission modes lor the VHF and UHF bends and amissions At A. F1 9 and J3E for 
the HF subband We also requested information on related issues including the number of 
questions appropriate for the Novice operator written examination, the number of volunteer 
examiners (VEs) required to property administer a Novice operator examination and whether 
a better balance between Ihe requirements and pnvtieges of the Technician operator license 
would be helpful More than 350 comments were Tiled, including tour reply comments 

2 The proposed enhanced Novice class privileges were tntendedto create a greater desire 
in new entrants into amateur radio to stay with the hobby and advance through its five iter 
licensing structure (n this way, the licensing structure would become more responsive to the 
needs and desires of the amateur community, The other proposals and questions warn 
generally related to the increase m Novice privileges or to the basic licensing procedures 

Comments 

3 More than 60% of the commemets supported the proposal. They believed that enhanced 
Novice operator privileges would attract and mtein more persons in the service In addition, 
manufacturers and djstnbutori ol amateur radio eq uip me nt said they hoped it would curb the 
loss of op e ra tor s and consequent declining sales of equipment. The major concern m the 
comments was thai excessrve privileges could diminish the incentive tor Novice operators to 
upgrade to a higher operator b ee nee Also ob je ct ed to was authorizing present Novice and 
Technioan operators licensees any additional privileges wnhoui requiring them to qualify by 
further exami nat ion 

4, The comments favored expanding Novice operator HF 10 meter prmleges to 28 1 -28 5 
MHz. Tne International Beacon Project, the international Amateur Radio Union and other 
c o m mentar s were concerned thai such an expansion could jeopardize the usefulness of the 
amateur beacon system They believed that amateur stations in other countries would be 
driven to transmit on beacon system frequencies m order to avoid congestion caused try an 
influx of siations with Novice and Technician control operators The American Radio Relay 
League, Inc (ARRL) staled, however, thai amateur operators traditionally observe voluntary 
operating restrictions when necessary tor the protection of universally beneficial operations 
like the beacon system 

5 The Notice of Proposed Rule Making in this proceeding proposed thai Novice control 
operators be authorized privileges m the entire VHF 1 ,25 meter band. The comments general- 
ly supported this proposal because if would provide a common meeting ground for new 
amateur operators lo meet experienced operators. In commenting on our statement that we 
will not finalize this aspecl until certain related allocation matters lor the 216-225 MHz band 
are resolved, ARRL said thai this proceeding has no connection with frequency allocation 
decisions 11 stated that Ihe inclusion ol Novice operator privileges on a band already available 
to the Amateur service would not affect future allocation revisions. 

6. Richard S Mosseson and other commenters pointed out thai the proposed UHF 023 
meter Novice operator privileges were not in keeping with the ARRL voluntary band plan In its 
reply commenls, ARRL acknowledged Ihe discrepancy and requested the subband be ai 
1270-1295 MH; where repeater operation is conducted . Also mentioned in the comments 
was a potential biological hazard lo the operator ol a station transmitting in this frequency 
range. 

7. The comments favored all emission modes in Ihe VHF and UHF bands so Novice 
operators could communicate using modern technology. Dissatisfaction with the telegraphy 
only privileges was blamed as a major causa of Novice operators dropping out of Ihe Amateur 
service. Although most commenters favored limiting Novice operators to emissions At A, FIB 
and J3E in ihe 10 meter subband. a few commenters urged authorization at emission A3E- 
Stlll olher commenters considered any HF emission privileges for Novice operators beyond 
AI A as a disincentive to upgrading. In its reply comments, ARRL said thai enhanced privi- 
leges in the Irmiied frequency bands proposed would operate as an Incentive for Novice 
operators lo upgrade About 5*b of the commenters were apprehensive Ihsi Novice operator 
telephony privileges in ihe 10 meter band could attract unlawful operators from the nearby 1 1 
meter band 

8 Novice operators were asked to comment an the proposal to limit their stations to low 
transmitter power while higher class operators could transmit on the same frequencies with 
high power The comments stated that (his would place Novice operated low power stations at 
a distinct disadvantage It was also suggested that alt stations transmitting on the Novice 
subbands be restricted to low power it was noted thai higher class operators would lose 
existing privileges A this approach were taken. 

9 The comments generally concurred that the topics on the Novice operator written 
examination should correspond to the privileges authorized They favored increasing exami- 
nation Element 2 to 30 questions or even to SO questions. Tne repealed concern was that 
Element 2 should not be so difficult as to discourage newcomers . 

to Twenty-one percent ol ihe comments discussed ARRL's request for two administering 
volunteer examiners (VEs| Some 9% of the comments stated that the one VE requirement 
should be continued because it is more convenient and less stressful for beginners About 5% 
of the comments including ihe ARAL'S disagreed and said thai enhanced privileges lor 
Novice operators necessitated a second administering VE lo minimize the likelihood ol 
examination fraud. Another 74* of the comments recommended that the examinations be 
prepared and administered under the volunteer examiner coordinator (VEC) system. ARRL 
opposed this approach because it would increase the burden on the VEC System and reduce 
the availability of examinations 

1 1 Comments were requested on confining the written examination for the Technician 
operator license to the privileges authorized by Ihat license Gordon West, an amateur 
operator instructor, stated that such a change would allow instructors to train students 
prepanng lor the Technician operator license more thoroughly in relevant VHF and UHF 
top*cs Another viewpoint expressed in the cc^rnents was tf^at arwther examinatx^ element 
would cornpucaie the examination process 

Discussion 

12 The prospect ol enhanced privileges lot Novice ope rator, has already stimulated 



growth In the service. In FY 1966. nearly 21 .000 new persons entered the Amateur service, an 
increase of 2075% over FY 1985 More than 19 ,000 became Novice operators. Furthermore, 
the number o* licenses dropping out of the Amateur service decreased by IS 1 3*Ma during the 
same period We believe these are clear indicators Ihat changes in the entry level license ere 
appropriate 

13 In its proposal regarding the 1 25 meter band p/HF}, the ARRL requested that Novices 
be permitted use of the band 220-225 MHz with alt voice and data modes including ra- 
tfJotetegraphy wrth a power limit of 25 watts output However. It asked that repeater operation 
by stations licensed or controlled by Novices not be permitted. *.e. a Novice signal could be 
retransmitted by a repeater, but a Novice operator could not sponsor or be the trustee of one 
The comments reflected an interest in VHF privileges for Movice operators In our view VHF 
privileges for Novices would create the kind of interest that is needed for amateurs to continue 
in the hobby and at the same lime motivate them in advance to the higher license classes To 
thes end we wril authorize frequencies 222 10-223 91 MHz for use by Novice operators This 
action In conjunction with voluntary band plans wil attow operation on repealer input and 
simplex channels Novices may not be licensees, control operators or trustees of the re- 
peaters Th« would perm it Novce operators to operate with tiic»se mc<!es most appropriate to 
their level of license and to communcate with mora experienced amateurs. For example, 
frequencies below 222 MHz are typicaHy used tor moonbounce, pro pagati on bea c o n s and 
control signals, activities generally engaged in by amateurs with more experience 

14 We agree with the commenters that the UHF 23 meter subband should be at 
1 270- \295 MH; to allow Novice operators to gam experience wrth repeater operation, Low 
transmitter power and kxorporation of suitable saiety precaution information in the amateur 
radio practices examination topics should assure mat Novice operators wM noi endanger 
themselves Thus, we w*H authorize the subband at 1270-1295 MHz as requested. 

15, The prospect ol interference to the 1 meter beacon system expressed in the comments 
is speculative and may never become a concern, given the record of amateur 'y f * " * in 
adhering to voluntary arrangements. Moreover, the low power limit proposed for stations with 
Novice com rot operators should satisfy this concern Thus, rt does not afford a reason not to 
go forward. 

18. II is evident from the comments that more emission modes win attract more Novice 
operators to the Ama leu r service. However, the frequency ranges in winch to use them should 
provide the proper degree of enhancement so thai Novice operators would Stat have an 
incentive to upgrade to higher operator licenses Thus, digital and limited telephony privileges 
in the 10 meter hand appear appropriate and will be authorized. 

1 7 We continue to believe m power restrictions lor Novice sections in the new bands, The 
restrict ion & will add a further incentive to upgrade the class of license. Also, because of the 
lesser experience level. Novice operators are more likely unintentionally to cause interfer- 
ence Reduced power levels will help Fimil the extent ol any interference 

18 When the privileges of any operator license class are modified. Ihe qualification 
requirements should be revised accordingly The Novice operator license written examination 
Element 2 is based upon telegraphy station operation. We believe the examination should be 
broadened In scope commensurate with enhanced Novice operator privileges We shall 
the rotor e require an additional 10 questions for a total of 30 to make the scope of Element 2 
appropriate to the new privileges, without creating a significani deterrent to potential Novice 
operator examinees 

19. We will adopt rules so that two VEs will prepare and administer Novice operator 
examinations Although there may be isolated areas where locating two VEs may be difficult, 
the added safeguard would be justified There are legal and practical problems which prevent 
placing Novice operator exam] nations under the VEC System. Additionally, to incorporate this 
work Into the VEC system would nearly double the workload and expense lor the volunteers 
operating that system We will accordingly adopt the two VE procedure and refleci ihat 
requirement In a revised Form 610, Application for Amateur Radio Station end/or Operator 
License. 

20. In a related issue, Novice operators may not be upgrading to Technician operator 
because the content of Element 3 requires them to also be knowledgeable about General 
class operator privileges. This is the only instance in the operator license progression where 
the applicant must not only know Ihe material for the operator privileges that will be authorized 
as the next siep (Technician), but also must know the material for the next higher step 
(General) To require any applicant to be knowledgeable about privileges which Ihe license 
does not authorize Is inconsistent and a burden upon applicants, administering VEs and 
Instructors. To resolve this problem, we will separate Element 3 into two parts Technician 
operator questions will be placed mloan Element 3(A) VEC question poet and General class 
questions will be placed into an Element 3(B) VEC question pool, tt would be timely to take this 
action at this juncture for two reasons First the VEC's will have to revise Element 3 as a result 
of this action tn order to move certain ol its questions to Element 2 in conjunction with 
enhanced Novice operator privileges Therefore, they could concurrently divide the remain- 
ing Efemeni 3 questions into an Element 3(A) and an Element 3(B) as appropriate Second, 
the application form ks being revised in order to incorporate provisions for Novice operator 
examination certification oy two administering VEs It could be concurrently revrsed to include 
marking boxes for Element 3(A) and for Element 3(B) 

Other Issue* 

21. AH present Novice and Technician o p er ato r s will be authorized the new pnvfleges 
without additional qualification However, we strongly recommend that present Novice opera- 
Tor licensees become knowledgeable in the new requirements before using their new pnw 
togas. For example, they should study the material In now Element 2 that relates to the 
enhanced Novice operator privileges even though we wfl not require that they be examined 
on ft As to present Technician operators, any examinee holding such a license issued before 
the effective dais of mesa ruJe amendments will be given examination credit lor Elements 
1(A), 2. 3(A) and 3(B) 

22 FCCFc^610i*i^rnjntlyDetr^fevisecinc^ 

to aftowmg credit to examine** for certain previously passed written examinations. Those 
revtsens and the revwont required by the action taken in this proceeding are being smvutta- 
neously incorporated into me form Upon receipt or Office of Management and Budget (OMB i 
approval o* FCC Form 610, we wrfl issue a Public Notice with a draft sample of the form 
attached The modified FCC Form 610 wit provide lor certification by two adminalenng VEs 
for the Novice VE System and for a revised Administering VEs Report. 



48 ?3 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



± t— l— t— t— 1 — t — t — t — I — V— I— t— * — I— X — I - 



HAM SOFTWARE FOR 
THE C-64 AND 128 

• LOGGING 

• CAT 

• c w 

Stop by our Booth at Dayton 

or 
Send for FREE Fact Sheet 



Crumtronics. Inc. 

RO. Box 6187 

Ft. Wayne, IN 46A9G 



^ 13 





Torold Cores. 
Iron Powder 
& Ferrlttt. 
Ferrlte Beads. 
Ferrlte Rods. 



Free cats tog ana wtndrng chart on request 



PALOMAR 



M 




Box 455, Escondido, CA 92025 
Phone: (619) 747 3343 -* m 



CABLE TV 



Ztflim jefT}ifl 5- - ^ra Oa* — many others 
Avo*d costly rentals oi converters — buv O^eci — 
Fre# i 'unrated catalogue — Can lor wr\oK>$a\e pricing 

APARE INDUSTRIES 1-313-670-6009 **-l95 
V 35552 Grand River Suite 355 Fgrmingion Ml 48024 



TUBES — 2000 TYPES 
DISCOUNT PRICES! 

Early, hafd-10-ftnd, arm modern 
lubes Also transformers, capaci- 
tors and parts for tuoe equipment 
Send $2 00 tor 20 page wholesale 

C&talog. 

Antique Electronic Supply 

688 W First St ■ Tempe. A2 85281 
602/894 9503 







?fit 



"INSTANT" MORSE CODE 

BEGINNERS: Deliciously Easy 
EXPERTS: Automatically Fast 

CURLY CODE" Manual ONLY $6.50 

GUARANTEED 

iflNDs 



Minduy* PufeHcillon*. Depl. s-24 

Sulfa 11S- 1« 

1350 B#v*iiy Rd. 

McL»iin.VAa21Ql ^^B 




NO TUNERS! 

NO RADIALS! 

NO RESISTORS! 

NO COMPROMISE! 

THREE EXCELLENT REVIEWS JUST 
DON'T HAPPEN BY CHANCE. 
CALL US FOR A FREE CATALOG 



■42 



3c? 



— A 



55 



BILAL COMPANY 

S ft 2, lot 61. Depi 11 
fuch*. OK 74 34 2 rM: 9 1 8-2 5 J -AQ9* 






NEWTNC-2 PACKET CN-1 CONNECT ALARM 



This unique device sounds a two second beep alarm when someone connects lo your .station. It 
also turns on a LED "CALL LITE" io let you know thai a connect has occurred while you were 
away. The "CALL LITE" will remain on until you push a button lo reset il. 

■ Installs in minutes— 3 easy connections 

■ Not a kit requires NO ASSEMBLY 

■ Mounts inside the TNC 

■ Works with any TAPR TNC-2 format -MFJ 1270, PAC-COM TNC200, AEA PK-80, ETC. 
Trans Com CN-1 assembled and tested, only $ 19.95 

Add $2.00 for Shipping and Handling 2 YEAR WARRANTO. 



For more information, 

write or call; Tram Com, Inc. 

703-13 Annoreno Drive 
Addison, Illinois 60101 

ViWMastrrCard dL'ifptcd (312] 543-9055 





^181 



GIVE YOUR EARS A BREAK! 

(And the XYL/s too!) 

The AUTQ-KALL AK-lQ, is a 0TMF select mta I fing unit ir connects to the 
externaf speaker jack on your VKF/UHF FM transceiver, scanner, eie. Your 
speaker remains silent until someone sends your personal 3 -digit Touch-Tone" 
code That means you (and the XYU) don't have to listen to air the charier ail the 
time. But il someone wants to reach you they can Great for lamihes with two or 
more hams, activation of emergency nets, etc 

FEATURES 

■ Completely assembled and ready to use 

* Easy setim§ of your personal code in seconds with small rotary switches No 
jumpers to sotcter. 

* Speaker resets automatically to si lent -standby and leaves red LED on to let 
you know someone called if you were away from the rig 

* 8-15 VDG CMOS circuitry provides tar low current operation, 

* Built-in speaker External speaker jack also provided 

E 





* Measures only 1 f A * 3 x Slfr inches * Decodes all 16 digtts 

TeuCTi-TortB is fnKJejrart or AT4T 



AUTO-KALL AK-10 

$AQ95 Huswoo 

U V shipping 4 fiandling 

117 VAC power supply and! audio 

patch cord included 

Matron Electronics 

695 W 21st Avenue 
Eugene, OR 97405 

503-687*2118 +m 



DIRECTION FINDING ? 



* interference Location 

* Stuck Microphones 

* Cable TV Leaks 

* Security Monitoring 




• VHF and UHF Coverage 

• Computer Interlace 

• Speech Synthesizer 

• 12 VDC Operation 



New Technology (patent pending) converts any VHF or UHF FM receiver into an 
advanced Doppler shift radio direction finder. Simply plug into receivers antenna 
and external speaker jacks. Uses four omnidirectional antennas. Low noise, high 
sensitivity for weak signal detection. Call or write for full details and prices 



r] DOPPLER SYSTEMS, INC. P.O. Box 31819 
[^ -is Phoenix, AZ 85046 



(602) 488-9755 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



MADE IN 
USA 




MODEL 

SG1OTF 

1429.95 

d*Hvered 



• Covert 100 MHz to 199.999 MHz in 1 kHz steps with 
thumbwheel dial * Accuracy +/- 1 part per 10 mil- 
lion at all frequencies ■ Internal FM adjustable from 
to 100 kHz at a 1 kHz rate • External FM input ac- 
cepts tones or voice • Spurs and noise at lea si 60 dB 
be tow carrier • Output adjustable from 5-500 mV at 
50 Ohms • Operates on 12 Vdc Vt Amp * Available 
lor immediate delivery • *429.95 delivered • Adton 
acces&ones available lo extend freq range, add inn- 
Rita resolution, AM, and a precision 120 dB attenua- 
tor • Call or write tor details * Phone in your order as 
fast COD shipment. 

VANGUARD LABS 

196-23 Jamaica Ave., Holds. NY 11423 
i71 Si 468-2720 Mon.-Thur* 



1 



.L BAND TRAP 
"SLOPER" ANTENNAS! 



FULL COVERAGE! ALL BINDS! AUTOMA- 
TIC SELECTION w'lhPROVEN Weatherproof 
multd Tr#pi 16 Gi Copper ««E4 Wir*l 

GROUND MOUNT 5L0PERS - No Ratfk«li 
nitJitf Qjiojjpid lo rod Of ft flu At »ll£r_LEyE tti 
Conned Top. to Tf«l, fluildtag*. Pale*, alt if 
ANY angle from StraEQhtjp lo CO degrcei TPf 
ciceiimt "SLOPER" DX Antflnn* Gain at 
bend It anywhere , ou nmm4 tof 2000 Watt 
PEP Input, man. Ptrminint nc portable Uia 
liis-Ull* In 10 mlniiln SMALL - NEAT - 

ALMOST JNVISABLE -No en* will kiY«w fou 
hive ■ Hl~Pow«f DX Antanna lde*» For CONDOi APART' 
MENTS- RESTRICTED AREAS - Pre*i ta n*d t OT Z-l nr liu 
SWR our ALL bindi fucipf fiO-160-3O0l,tj Ho adjati- 
mintt needed - £VtR COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED, whh 
SO ri RG^SSLI Cut reedlme «nd PL259 connictor- Bui( 
I* iiQtitt#ie wftstip - pv*d r io hoeiito! FULL INSTRUC- 
TIONS! 

No- ioa05-eO-4O-20-*5-10— i trap V* tu ^SSMBS 

No, 104 OS 4O-20-I5-1O — 1 trap 26 t\. SSfl 95 

No. 1020S 20-15-10 1 trap 13 «. — -1ST 95 

Ho. l016S-16O-eO- 0-20-IS-10 -2 tripi 03 N. - *89 95 

SEND FULL PRICE FOR PPDELlN USA (C*n«4a !■ SS.OQ 
eitPi (or puii a( |g ncj or ordir uilng VISA, MASCAHD- 
AMER EXP. Gtva Number En Dale- Prt 1-300-235-53^^ 
WEetdtyi We ship In 2-3 6*ri{P*r Cli 14 diynGuartnittd 
1 jrr - ID ttav mon*r »*<i. \rlmt 

WESTERN ELECTRONICS 
Otpl. A7 Ke»TBf. N«b# B »|[» 6804T 




73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 49 




EVER SAY DIE 



from page 12 

the right to change my mind com* 
pietely if something better comes 
along. 

FREELOADING? 

In my February editorial I point- 
ed out— perhaps much too sub- 
tly—that we amateurs have been 
given the almost exclusive use of 
billions— perhaps trillions — of dol- 
lars in radio spectrum. What I 
didn't yet mention was what if 
anything, we're doing to be worth 
this enormous investment by our 
government. And it's just that — an 



investment. The FCC could start 
teasing out radio frequencies to 
the highest bidders. They might 
even be able to balance the feder- 
al budget that way. 

Let's see. Let's take just a little 
bit, say our 1 60-meter band. 1 60m 
used to run from 1715-2050 kHz 
before WWII, If they extended the 
broadcast band by just 500 kHz, 
that would be fifty more 10-kHz 
channels— room for at least 2,500 
more stations to operate. Have 
you any idea what the rights to use 
2,500 radio channels are worth? 
Billions, 

Okay— so we're each sitting on 
millions of dollars of valuable 
spectrum— how are we supposed 
to make this investment pay off for 
the country? Let's get out our 
rules and look at our franchise — 
it's right there in 97.1. That's 
where the FCC spells out what we 
have to do to warrant this enor- 
mous investment per user. 

You should remember that the 
rules were written in 1935, Is il 
going to be a surprise to you that 
these rules are just a tad out of 
date? Hey, please don't mention 
this to the FCC — the last thing we 
need right now is to have them 
taking a look at our franchise in 
the light of 1987 realities. As long 
as the Commission is wrapped up 
in "more important 4 " problems 
and forgets we're around, we're 
sailing free. 

First— keep in mind the 1935 
rules were written back when ten 
meters was still a VHF ex pen men- 
tal band. Look back in your 1935 
issues of OST and you'll see that 
ham pioneers were working to de* 
velop 10m communications tech- 
nology, I well remember Fred 
Stevenson W1CUN, up in Bethle- 
hem, New Hampshire, the first 

50 73 Amateur Radio * April , 1987 



ham I ever met t as one of those 
ten-meter pioneers, 

The microwaves weren't even 
imagined then. As I recall the reg- 
ulatory imagination stopped 
around 400 MHz. Beyond that 
was "up/' Today our microwave 
bands are almost beyond calcula- 
tion in value for satellite communi- 
cations—and with so few excep- 
tions they prove the rule, we' re flat 
out not using -em for anything. 
Worse, we don't even have any 
serious prospects for using 'em 
in mind. 

There are five elements to our 
franchise — our responsibilities. 
Let's look at what we signed up for 
when we got our ham tickets and 
see how well we are measuring up 
to our agreement. 

One — the amateur radio "ser- 
vice" is to provide a source of 
trained operators in time of war. 
Hmmm. Let's just think about 
that. When el btggo came along in 
1941 we had about 50.000 li- 
censed amateurs. I think you'll 
agree we lived up to our bargain 
when 40,000 joined the armed 
forces— 80%. That obviously in* 
votved every available able-bod- 
ied ham who wasn't too young or 
too old. 



pefy anyone, and it takes only a 
couple minutes for a low-flying 
black-cat bomber to sneak in and 
blooie! So. just in case, it seemed 
to me worthwhile to have an alert- 
ing system in case an operator 
missed seeing a blip. Such a 
target indicator is common with 
radars these days, but was un- 
known then. 

Also, I wanted to be able to keep 
track of what was going on, so I set 
up a monitor in my bunk in the 
After Battery so I could check the 
radar from there as well as when I 
was on duty in the conning tower, 

We won that war with technolo- 
gy — by having better electronic 
scientists and engineers and 
enough technicians to operate 
and service all that gear. We're 
just now reading about some of 
the communications coups ac- 
complished back then — breaking 
secret codes. As I've mentioned 
before, our radar superiority over 
the Japanese was of critical im- 
portance. My submarine was able 
to travel on the surface right down 
through the middle of well-protect- 
ed Japanese troop convoys in the 
middle of the night, torpedoing 
ships left and right, with me keep- 
ing track of the course and speed 
of every escort warship, while they 
were unable to spot us. 

Our electronic technology was 
so far ahead of the Japanese's 
during the war that the captain of 
my submarine had instructions 



"These days I see a whole new life 
at HQ — an enthusiasm i never used 

to see. if you give HQ a live board, 

I think they'll blossom and well get 

amateur radio growing again. ff 



Those were simpler days, so 
our Morse-code skills were Stilt of 
value. I even ran into an occasion 
when my ability to copy the code 
saved me and my submarine from 
being sunk, And I found my ama- 
teur radio technical knowledge of 
enormous value in learning how to 
use and repair Navy radio, sonar, 
radar t and test equipment. 

I'm sure I was like many other 
hams in the armed forces, using 
my ham ingenuity at every oppor- 
tunity. I rifled spare parts supplies 
on my submarine to build a radar 
alerting system to make sure I 
didn't miss any sudden targets. 
You see, sitting and watching a 
radar monitor for hours will stu- 



not to let me be captured alive. 
That was a sobering reality of war 
which the other crew members 
look delight in reminding me of 
during our many depth-charge 
attacks, 

Considering the enormous ad- 
vances in electronic technology in 
Japan these days, we'd better 
make absolutely sure they are on 
our side from now on. They're 
leaving us hopelessly behind in 
many high-tech electronic devel- 
opment areas. 

But let's just say that somehow 
the U.S. manages to gel involved 
in a war. How valuable would we 
hams be to our military today as 
compared with 1941? Frankly, 



from what military equipment IVe 
seen, 99% of us wouldn't have a 
clue. The few of us who can use 
the code would get the big laugh, 
Communications are all comput- 
erized now— most of it complete 
with automatic encoding and de- 
coding for secrecy. 

The few of us who have been 
fighting the miserable Loran puls- 
es on 160m may not realize this 
system is hopelessly out of date. 
With satellites it's now possible 
for a car to find its way around 
city streets, located and guided 
with an accuracy of a few feet by 
computers. 

I know of no interest on the part 
of the military to acquaint radio 
amateurs with their electronics 
and communications technology 
of today. So we haven't a clue as 
to what, if anything, we might do 
should there be a sudden need 
for technicians and operators. 
Frankly, I think we'd be ignored 
as useless— not just because 
such a high percentage of us are 
too old to be of use any more, 
but because most of us are hope- 
lessly ignorant about modern 
technology, 

In short, I don't believe we're 
even remotely honoring this part 
of our franchise as expressed in 
our rules. 

Okay, there Bre four more re- 
sponsibilities we're supposed to 
fulfill in order to be worthy of the 
trillions of dollars in frequencies 
we>e hogging. Let's move on. 

Number two— we're supposed 
to be a self-generating group. 
We're supposed to maintain and 
increase our ranks so we will be 
able to provide the operators and 
technicians for emergency mili- 
tary use. We're not doing that 
either 

Number three— we're sup- 
posed to keep on top of communi- 
cations technology, and use our 
creative technological skills to in- 
vent and pioneer new modes of 
communications. Up until about 
twenty years ago we were doing 
very well with this. For instance, 
hams developed the sideband cir- 
cuits which made SSB a practical 
possibility. We invented and pio- 
neered narrowband FM, slow- 
scan television, invented most of 
the RTTY circuits, pioneered re- 
peaters, and so on, 

It was hams who built the SSB 
gear and demonstrated it to the 
Air Force and got them to accept 
this weird new communications 
mode. I remember well the antics 
of K2AAA, Art Collins W0CXX, 
General Curtis LeMay, General 
Butch Griswald, and Bill Qrenfell 




ASTRON 

CORPORATION 



9Autry 

Irvine, CA 92718 

(714)458-7277 



-16 



Canadian Distributor 
Eastcom Industries, Ltd, 

430 Signet Dr. 

Weston, Ontario, Canada M9L2T6 

(416)743-7601 




ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

► HEAVY DUTY • HIGH QUALITY • RUGGED * REUABLE < 



INSIDE VIEW- RS 12A 



RS ami VS SERIES 
SPECIAL FEATURES 

• SOLID STATE ELECTRICALLY REGULATED 

• F0LL>BACK CURRENT LIMITING Protects Power Supply 
from excessive current 4 continuous stiorted output. 

• CROWBAR OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION on all Models 
except RS-4A, 

• MAINTAIN REGULATION & LOW RIPPLE at low line 
input Voltage. 

■ HEAVY DUTY HEAT SINK • CHASSIS MOUNT FUSE 

• THREE CONDUCTOR POWER CQRD 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY • MADE IN USA 



PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 

• INPUT VOLTAGE: 105 - 125 VAC 

• OUTPUT VOLTAGE: 138 VDC ± 0.05 vote 
[Internally Adjustable: 1 M5 VDC) 

• RIPPLE: Less than 5mv peak to peak (full load 
& km line) 





MODEL RS -BOA 



MODEL RS-50M 




MODEL VS-50M 



RM-A Series 




If" I 5!4 RACK MOUNT POW r l SUPPLIES 

Continuous 
Model Duty (AMPS) 



RJW35A 



25 



MODEL RM -35A 



RM-5GA 37 

SEPARATE VOLT & AMP METERS 

RM-35M 25 

RM-50M 37 



ics* 

(AMPS) 

as 

50 

35 
50 



Size (IN) 
HXWXD 

m> 19* 12V S 
5V* » 19 • 12'A 

5% x 19 x 12% 

5 V* x 19 x 12% 



snipping 

Wt* (lbs.) 

50 

38 

50 



RS-A SERIES 




MODEL RS7A 



MODEL 

R5-4A 

RS-7A 
RS-76 

RS-10A 
RS-12A 
RS-2QA 

RS-35A 

RS-50A 



Continuous 
duty (Amps) 

3 

5 
5 

7.5 
9 
16 
25 

37 



ICS* 

(Amps) 

4 

7 

7 

10 

12 
20 
35 
50 



Size (IN) 
H x W X D 

3V- x Wt x 9 

3V- x 6Y2 x 9 

4 ■ 7Vs x.10% 

4 x V/t x 10V- 

4Vi x8x9 

5x 9x WA 

5x11 x 11 

6 x 13V< x 11 



Shipping 
Wt (lbs) 

5 
9 

10 

11 

13 
18 
27 
46 



RS-M SERIES 




MODEL RS-35M 



MODEL Continuous 

• Switchable Volt a/vd Amp Meter Duty (AfTipS) 

RS-12M 9 

* Separate Volt and Amp Meters * c 

RS-20M 25 

RS-35M 37 
RS-5QM 



ICS* 

(Amps) 

12 
20 

35 
50 



Size (IN) 
HxWxD 

4Vz x 8x9 

5 x 9 x 1 0Vi 

5x11x11 

5 x 13V- x M 



Shipping 
Wl (lbs) 

13 
18 
27 

45 






VS-M SERIES 




■ Separate Volt and Amp Meters 

• Outpui Voltage adjustable from 2-15 volts 

* Current limit adjustable from 1 .5 amps to Full Load 



MODEL VS-2GM 





Continuous Duty 


ICS* 








(Amps) 


(Ampi) 


Sizs (IN) 


Shipping 


MODEL 


St3.IVDC^iWOC«5WX: 


S-13.SV 


HiWiD 


Wt (lbs) 


VS-20M 


16 9 4 


20 


5x9x 10V? 


20 


VS-35M 


25 15 7 


35 


5x11 x 11 


29 


VS-50M 


37 22 10 


50 


6 x 13V* x 11 


46 


• Built in speaker 












Continous 


ICS* 


Size (IN) 


Snipping 


MODEL 


Duty (Amps) 


Amps 


HxWxD 


Wt (lbs) 


RS-7S 


5 


7 


4 x 1% x 10X 


10 


RSI OS 


7,5 


10 


4 x lYix 10& 


12 


RS-IOL(FwLTR) 7.5 


10 


4x9x13 


13 


RS12S 


9 


12 


4fc x 8 x 9 


13 


RS20S 


IS 


20 


5x9* 10ft 


18 



RS-S SERIES 




MODEL RS-12S 



#* 



When You Bay. Say 73 



** 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 51 



W4GF of the FCC back then. 
That's a great story and should be 
told before everyone involved 
dies. 

To be told, too T should be the 
way Collins outfoxed General 
Electric and John Costas K2EN 
with his superior DS8 system- 
great political maneuvering which 
cost GE hundreds of millions. 

But, alas, what have we hams 
done in the last twenty years to 
pioneer new communications 
technologies? Packet is about it. 
When you consider the incredible 
number of potential new com- 
munications systems we could 
develop, obviously we're asleep. 
Between computers and micro- 
waves, we have the technology 
right now to develop a communi- 
cations system using satellites 
and repeaters which would en- 
able us to deliver messages at 
25,000 words per minute any- 
where in the world in seconds — 
complete with automatic transla- 
tion of the messages into any 
language. 

The sad fact is that it takes 
younger technicians to build and 
pioneer these things and we 
haven't got 'em. Strike three. 

Let's see — what else. Oh yes, 
we're supposed to provide a 
source of international goodwill. 
We're sure working hard on this 
one, with our DX pileups, harass- 
ing DX stations for contacts and 
QSLs for DXCC, driving 'em off 
the air with endless contests, and 
so on. Tell me about international 
friendship. There i© no way to 
have an uninterrupted contact 
with someone in a rare spot. 

Now, last and least, we're sup- 
posed to help out in cases of 
emergency. We do this, but the 
communication we provide is so 
incredibly far from the stale of 
the art that it's pitiful. We con- 
gratulate the hell out of our- 
selves for the magnificent work 
we do to help with earthquakes, 
storms, volcanos, and so on. And 
we do help. But compared to what 
we technically could do if our 
communications system wasn't 
about thirty years out of date, it's 
embarrassing. 

The emergency communica- 
tions networks we set up these 
days ail use voice for message 
handling, thereby slowing down 
the throughput and introducing 
errors. Some 12% of the commu- 
nications time is wasted with sta- 
tion and operator identification. 
14% involves correcting errors or 
misunderstood communications. 
The increasing age of our opera- 
tors has made it more difficult to 



find enough operators for serious 
emergencies — and those we do 
find are often not abfe to cope with 
hardship conditions. They tire 
quickly. 

An objective look at our charter 
and our fulfillment of our response 
btlities under that charter shows 
us woefully lacking. Mea culpa. 
Can we get ourselves straight- 
ened out before the FCC notices 
how badly we've dropped the 
ball? You bet we can— and it isn't 
all that difficult either, 

The prime move for us is to 
bend our every effort at getting 
youngsters back into amateur ra- 
dio. Raid the schools— get school 
clubs going no matter how difficult 
"educators" make it. Get your 
own youngsters to come to your 
local club meetings. If the meet- 
ings are dull and boring (which 
they are, and you know it), make 
sure they're made exciting. That 
means making big changes. 



our country with the scientists, in- 
ventors, engineers, and techni- 
cians we desperately need to 
compete with Japan. 

Now, are you going to spend the 
few remaining years of your ham 
life tying up a local repeater, say- 
ing almost nothing over and over, 
jamming up our more crowded 
bands during contests, making 
life miserable for your fellow DX- 
ers by adding to the pileups— or 
are we going to see you Elmering 
newcomers? Will I be hearing you 
making amateur radio a bit more 
fun for a Novice? Will you be work- 
ing to get a school radio club 
going? Will you endow a 73 
subscription for a local school 
library? Or will I be hearing you 
jamming the 40-meter service 
nets and stomping all over 80-me- 
ter DX stations trying to get 
through? Are you one of the hope- 
lessly frustrated, doing everything 
you can to mess up the fun others 



"Keep in mind the 1935 rules were 

written back when ten meters was 

still a VHF experimental band. " 



Now— technology. If you keep 
accepting the pap you've been 
putting up with in your ham mag- 
azines, that's just what you'll 
continue to get. Push the ham 
magazines to help you learn more 
about today's technology. Elec- 
tronics is a ball— the more you 
know, the more opportunities will 
open for you to take advantage of 
your knowledge. And the opportu- 
nities are unlimited. We're going 
to see communications expand- 
ing by a factor of a thousand or 
more in the next few years— with 
or without us. 

Are you on packet radio yet? 
What in the heck do you need, an 
enema? Get out your August 73 
and read it this time. It's ail there. 
Then get busy, Put together a 
packet unit and stop sitting 
around like a mental amputee. 
Some old fogies treat amateur ra- 
dio as if it were golf — which is de- 
fined in some circles as a way to 
needlessly extend useless lives. 

We're sitting on top of a gold 
mine— not just as a key to making 
money as communications sys* 
terns expand— but in the sense 
that if we are true to our duty as 
outlined in our rules, we'll be get- 
ting youngsters into amateur ra- 
dio. This will, in turn, launch them 
into high-tech careers, providing 



are having, or are you working 
with kids and keeping up with the 
state of the art? 

Well, damn! There goes that 
confounded Wayne Green 
spreading doom and gloom— and 
making you feel guilty about our 
hobby. Maybe — but is it me mak* 
ing you feet guilty or yourself? t T m 
only telling you things you really 
know already, but have been try- 
ing to ignore. 

Oh yes, if you try to make any 
effort at all towards getting ama- 
teur radio growing, one thing 
you're going to find straight out is 
that I haven't been exaggerating 
one whit about the resistance 
you're going to find to the code, I 
warn you f if you don't have any 
honest answers for the kids on 
this, they're going to see through 
your baloney if you try and con- 
vince them the code has any va- 
lidity these days. Don't you hate 
a smart kid? Well, they're smart 
and they don't buy baloney the 
way we did. 

A no-code license? No problem 
here at all, as I've mentioned be- 
fore. It's simple— as soon as the 
ARRL demands a no-code license 
from the FCC we'll have one. How 
do we do that? Simple again— 
you're the people who vote in the 
ARRL directors. If you want a no- 



code license — say for 220 MHz — 
just stop voting in directors who 
are opposed to \L What couid be 
simpler? You vote in these blokes 
every two years, so if you really 
want a change it'll take you two 
years to do it. Period. 

As long as you continue to vote 
in directors who would rather see 
amateur radio die than bend on 
no-code, even for 220 MHz, we're 
in deep do-do. Now — I don't think 
I've attacked the League or even 
said anything nasty. That certain- 
ly isn't my intention, t just want to 
mention again what was brought 
out so clearly at the Dayton ham 
industry meeting last year. One 
more thing— I'll bet you won't find 
anyone at ARRL HQ fighting you 
once you clean up the director 
mess you've made. Tm very im- 
pressed by the new HQ gang. 

The League used to be run by a 
bunch of arrogant alcoholics who 
were very cynical about amateur 
radio. None were really hams at 
all— just bureaucrats keeping 
their jobs by having ham calls. 
These days I see a whole new life 
at HO— an enthusiasm J never 
used to see— and l*ve known 'em 
all personally for over 35 years 
now, If you give HQ a live board, I 
think they'll blossom and we'll get 
amateur radio growing again. 

The strength of the League, like 
the strength of amateur radio it- 
self, lies in your interest— your 
strength. If you ignore director 
elections, you'll get just what you 
ask for — bureaucrats looking for 
power. If you ignore your duty as a 
ham, you'll see us continue to lose 
our hobby. Your personal involve- 
ment is needed — as an individu- 
al— as an active ham club mem- 
ber. The prize? t guarantee you*ll 
find it frustrating beyond descrip- 
tion—and rewarding beyond any- 
thing else you've ever undertak- 
en. What a glorious sense of 
satisfaction there is in helping oth- 
ers get their ham tickets and then 
go on to become successful engi- 
neers and technicians, 

EMP REVISITED 

Six years ago the FCC's De- 
fense Commissioner Mimi Daw- 
son, with the support of Chairman 
Mark Fowler and Senator Goidwa- 
ter t formed the Long Range Plan- 
ning Committee (LRPC), with four 
National Industry Advisory Com- 
mittees (NIAC) to assist ft The 
LRPC was made up of top execu- 
tives in the communications in- 
dustry, brought together to formu- 
late ^n overall plan for emergency 
communications for our country. 

The first step was to see what 



52 73 Amateur Radio ■ April, 1987 




KITTY SAYS: WE ARE NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK. 

Saturday & Sunday 10 to 5 P.M. 

Monday-Friday 9 to 6:30 PM Thurs. to 8 PM 
Come to Barry's for the best buys in town. 

^^ ONV Safety 

"^- belts in stock 



the best buys in town call: 
21 2-925-7000 

Los Precios Mas Bajos en 
Nueva York. . . 



We Give You the Best In Amateur and 
Commercial Radios. . .Call Us. It's 
Jen KB2RV, KKty WA2BAP, Mark K2CON 

See You March 2 2nd DVHA, Trenton, NJ 

See You Apnl 5th, at BAftA. Paramus. NJ (Speed!) 






[fCOM ! 



IC-R71A, 751 A. 745.2&A/H, 38A. 48A. Micro! 4 
R-70OO. I271A, 275A/H. 3200A. 475A/H, 73b + 



KENWOOD 



Antennas 



m@§w 



FT-767GX . FT-98Q, FT-757GX , FRG-6800 
FT- 72§, FflG 9600, FT-270/77OR.H. FT 2700HH 




*afTT 



' ** k *. 



MQOgSLOX 



YAESU 

FT-23/73/727R 

FT-2/709H/H 

FT-1 903/11 23 



TS440S/AT. R-5000. R 2000. TS-940 S/AL TM 2010. 
TR36Q0A. TM-2S70A/SOA/30A. TR-751A 
Kenwood Se rv I ce/Rd pair, TH 21/31 /41 BT TM-211A/ 
411A. TS-7I1A811A. TM3530A, TH205AT, TH215AT. 



RF Concepts 



JCOM Lind-Mobila Hfl 

IC2AT712AT M id (andf Standard 
(C02AT WW ion ****cwi 

IC-03/04AT Yi ** u "C 1123, FTC H43 
IC-A2/U 1 6 ,COM 'OM5 fMjirlrwj «700 




N£L*TECH DVK-1DD DJgiial Voice Keyef 

COMPU-FIRE EXTlNGUtSHERS 

VoCom/Mirage/Daiwa 

Tokyo Hy*Power/TE SYSTEMS 
Amplifiers & 
5/eXHT Gain 
Antennas IN STOCK 

# 




SMART PATCH 

CES Simple* Autopatcn 510 SA Will Paieh fm 
Transceiver To Yout Telephone Great For 
Telephone Calls From Mobile To Base Simple 

To use. PRIVATE PATCH HI, 

Duplex 8000 in slock 

Bud wick ANT, Products 

I FLUKE 77 Multimeter 




AMEHITRON AMPLIFIER AUTHORIZED DEALER 



e 




Yaesu FTR-2410, Wilson 
ICOM IC-RP 3010 (440 MHz) 
ICOM IC-RP 1210 (1.2 GHz) 



SANTEC 
ST-222/UP 

ST-20T 

ST-442/UP 
HT-7 



Nye MBVA 

3 Kilowatt Tuner 






Soldering 

Station, 



48 Watts, $68 

MICROLOG-ART 1 , Air Disk, 
SWL. Morse Coach 

KANTRONICS 
UTU.KAM.UTU-XT, 
KPC2400, KPCII 

EIMAC 



Computer Interfaces 

stocked: 

MFJ-1224 t AEACP-1 t 
DR*DX, PK-87, PK-64A, 
PK-64, DR.QSO, PK-232, 
PM-1 





ALPHA AMPLIFIERS 



AEA 144 MHz 
AEA 220 MHz 
AEA 440 MHz 

ANTENNAS 




3-500Z 
572B. 6JS6C 
12BY7A & 
4400A 

BIRO 




Wattmeters &m^fk "" '* 7* 
Elements S^ 



In Stock 



Complete Butternut Antenna 
Inventory In Stock* 



DIGITAL FREQUENCY COUNTERS 

Trionyx, Model TR-1000, 0-600 MHz I T 
AMP SUPPLY STOCKED '— 

Long range Wireless 
Telephone iot «*oort in sroct 



BENCHER PADDLES, 
| BALUNS, 

IN STOCK 



MIRAGE AMPLIFIERS 
ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 
Sax ton Wire & Cable 



Ten- Tec Tuner 229 A 



MFJ Models 

422, 313. 989B, & 941 D 



SANGEAN Portable Shortwave Radios 




ooo 



* • 




HEIL 

EQUIPMENT 
IN STOCK 



Tfi-C* Tower* 




Hy Gain Towers 
4 Antenna* and J 
Borers will be 
shipped direct to 
you FREE of . 
shipping cost 




New TEN-TEC 

Corsair II, PARAGON, Century 22, RX-32S 



MAIL ALL ORDERS TO BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP.,,512 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY, NY 10012. 



saaHHraaaH; 



COMPLETE REPAIR LAB ON PREMISES 



"Aqul Se Habla Espanol" 

BARRY INTERNATIONAL TELEX 12-7670 

MERCHANDISE TAKEN ON CONSIGNMENT 

FOR TOP PRICES 

Monday - Friday 9 A.M. to 6:30 P M Thursday to fl PM 
Saturday & Sunday 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. (Free Parking) 

AUTHORIZED DISTS MCKAY DYMEK FOR 
SHORTWAVE ANTENNAS & RECEIVERS. 

IBT/LEX -"Spring S!. Station" 
Subways: BMT-"Prfnce St. Station" 

IND-"F" Train-Bwy. Station 

Bus: Broadway #6 to Spring St. 

Path-9th St./6th Ave. Station. 



Commercial Equipment 
Stocked: ICOM, MAXON. 
Midland, Standard Wil 
son T Yaesu We serve 
municipalities busi- 
nesses. Civil Defense, 
ate, PortaPtes, mobiles, 
bases, repealers 



We Stock: AEA, ARRL T Alpha, Ameco. Antenna Specialists, Astatic. Aslron, 
B & K t B k W. Bencher, Bird, Butternut. CDE. CES T Collins. Communications 
Spec. Connectors, Covercraft, Cushcrafl, Daiwa. Den t ron , Digimax, Drake. 
ETO<Alpha). Eimac, Encomm. HeilSound, Henry- Hustler (Newtromcs). Ky- 
Gain, Icom, KIM. Kanlromcs, Larsen. MCM (Daiiva). MFJ, J.W. Miller. Mrni- 
Products, Mirage. Newlfonics, Nye Viking, Pafomar, RF Products, Radio 
Amateur Caiibook Rockwell Collins. Saxton, Shore, Telex, Tempo, Ten-Tec, 
Tokyo Hi Power. Tnonyx TUBES, W2AU, Waber. Wilson, Yaesu Ham and 
Commefciai Radios. Vocom, Vtbroplex, Curtis, Tn-Ex, Wacom Duplexers, 
Repeaters. Pheips Dodge, Fanon intercoms. Scanners, Crystals, Radio 
Publications. 

WE NOW STOCK COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 
HAM DEALER INQUIRES INVITED PHON6 JN YOUR ORDER A BE REIMBURSED 



COMMERCIAL RADIOS tfockad A s«rvlc»d on pr«ml«»*. 

Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises, Call 

Export Ord«rs Shipped Immediately. TELEX 1 2-7670 *" 41 



ALL 

SALES 
FINAL 



had been done in the past to cope 
with emergencies — what systems 
were available and how they had 
worked. The next step was to look 
closely at all communications sys- 
tems and their role in helping us 
cope with future emergencies. 
Emergencies encompassed ev- 
erything from local problems due 
to accidents, fires, and floods — to 
regional emergencies due to 
earthquakes— right on up to the 
ultimate emergency; an atomic 
attack. 

The IRPC soon had to face 
one fundamental fact: Only the 
amateur radio service had the 
potential for providing the need- 
ed communications. The military 
depended almost entirely on 
commercial telephone lines for 
their communications (95%)— 
and the first thing that seems 
to go out in any emergency is the 
telephone. Indeed, it was this 
which put the Alaskan military 
bases out of communications with 
the Pentagon for almost a week 
following the Alaskan earthquake. 
Their only communications were 
via hastily set up amateur radio 
ndworxs. 

The LRPC and the FCC then 
faced an extremely serious prob- 
lem If the only dependable emer- 
gency communications system 
that could tie together police, fire, 
towns, road crews; two-way ser- 
vices such as trucks, taxis, doc- 
tors; television remote units, CB, 
CAP, MARS, broadcast radio and 
TV, and so on was amateur radio, 
then we were going to need a sub* 
stantial growth and modernization 
of this service. The traffic volumes 
estimated were several orders of 
magnitude beyond the capability 
of our present voice or CW com- 
munications systems. These vol- 
umes could only be handled by 
high-speed automated digital 
communications such as packet 
radio. 

The LRPC and the Commission 
then tried to tackle the need for 
vastly more hams. The only ham 
system in the world that seemed 
to be working these days was the 
one adopted by the Japanese — a 
no*code license. Efforts to imple- 
ment this here were completely 
stopped by the ARRL directors. In 



frustration, the FCC disbanded 
the LRPC and its N1AC commit- 
tees last year — giving up on the 
whole emergency communica- 
tions situation. 

All this is the background— 
and, my apologies singe I've 
covered it all before — but I find 
many ham memories seem to 
be incredibly short when it comes 
to the no-code debacle. A cou- 
ple of hams have been pushing 
the FCC to deal with the prob- 
lem of electromagnetic pulses 
(EMP) so the few amateurs we 
have left will be in a better posi- 
tion to provide emergency com- 
munications should an atomic 
bomb be used. 

Little has been published on 
how we can cope with this prob- 
lem, Indeed, we have little in- 
formation on how much of a 



shield and protect our ham sta- 
tions—unless data is available 
to help manufacturers build in 
bypassing and shielding— the on- 
ly backup communications our 
country has in case of such an 
emergency will be completely out 
of business. 

Well, you say, the likelihood 
of an atomic attack is remote 
enough so all that is just the usu- 
al gloom and doom baloney. 
That's nothing I have to worry 
about anymore. Okay; let me 
repeat a bit of another recent 
editorial— backed up by the Con- 
nections program I saw last night 
on PBS, You have to be terribly 
out of touch not to know that 
atomic bombs are now portable 
enough to fit in a suitcase— per 
the illustration on Connections. 
So all that's necessary is for one 



"Unless data is made available to 
help us shield and protect our ham 

stations. . . the only backup 

communications our country has in 

case of such an emergency will be 

completely out of business. " 



problem this really is! Some re- 
ports indicate that a high-altitude 
bomb might wipe out most solid- 
state equipment for a thousand 
miles around, Pffft would go all 
our HTs and mobile VHP gear- 
plus our low*band rigs — leaving 
us nothing with which to commu- 
nicate. The Department of De- 
fense (OOP) has been fighting to 
keep the FCC out of the EMP 
arena— saying there's plenty of 
information available on how to 
guard against EMP. The hams 
replied that the key information on 
this is classified — or, at best, ap- 
parently only available to large 
corporations. 

Can ham gear be protected 
against EMP so we would have a 
chance to do our thing in case 
of an atomic bomb? Unless data 
is made available to help us 



terrorist group to grab enough 
nuclear material and guess where 
they're going to head, suitcase 
in hand? 

Nuclear material comes from 
atomic power plants— where sev- 
eral recent reports have shown 
security often is pitiful. Plus we 
have nuclear sources new in 
more and more Third World coun- 
tries. How much trouble would 
Kaddafi have getting enough 
for a bomb? The French seem 
eager to sell atomic energy equip- 
ment to virtually any country in- 
terested. 

So it's more a question of 
when we're going to be faced with 
a nuclear terrorist than if. As I 
asked in my editorial—how ready 
is your club? If you're around 
New York or Washington, you'd 
better be very ready, with as 



hardened protection against EMP 
as possible — with as high-speed 
automated communications as 
the state of the art will allow. De- 
pending on Morse code for com- 
munications, where we'll be the 
only service capable of replacing 
the telephone, is about as effec- 
tive as planning to use smoke 
signals. 

Not only are the military almost 
totally dependent upon tele- 
phones, so are virtually alt other 
disaster groups. Civil Defense of- 
ficials have almost universally 
given up even trying to use ama- 
teur radio links— too slow com- 
pared to picking up the telephone. 
Ham communication is slow, seri- 
ously prone to errors, and too de- 
pendent upon older men without 
the stamina needed. 

I think you'll find the latest filing 
by the hams trying to get the FCC 
to face this situation of interest. 
Talk about fighting c*ty hall! 

Now. lest I be put down (now. 
who would do that?) for doom and 
gloom without solutions, the way 
to resoJve this is to first get the 
FCC to help us find out how to 
cope with EMP— despite the un- 
reasonable resistance of the 
DOD. Second, it's getting on to 
time to recognize our need for a 
million or so hams instead of 
more like the 250,000 we have 
today. Third, we need to urge 
the few technically competent 
hams we have— those who didn't 
Bash or bribe their way to Extra 
class— to start work on high- 
speed automatic digital communi- 
cations systems — like packet, on- 
ly much faster. We need to be able 
to provide million-message 
throughputs, not dozens — and our 
gear should be capable of being 
operated by anyone around who 
is still alive. 

We have the technology to do 
all this— all we lack is the techni- 
cians and the guts to face the 
biggest challenge of our lives. 
Lacking this, my suggestion is to 
move as far away from New York 
or Washington as you can— and 
soon! Living near those death 
traps could be more harmful than 
smoking — or even Southern Cali- 
fornia and its coming humdinger 
earthquake ■ 



"MULTI-BAND SLOPERS' 

A I. SO DIFQLE SAL IMI 1* Ea SP ACE AHTENN A5 

OulUjMidiiig UBtiorminca vi WyiNN ■nlomHir li wall knuwTn No* $r\ 
miv irmllibniiifl liHj SltiNAl rtfHWLIi AulomnJlc Dim iliyj n ir fiui|j ■ Yf.m <i 
In* $W\ ■ r.um ititml ■ 3kw power ■ CnmpacE ■ EMLlJ A'.M nThi in I 

III V 1 1 ■: , r - J i n 1 1 DPftttr Iruqu-ii.-p- H,ii-n t:;ni:l ■ h •■ T,' '• m,Ii|I \<*ic; 

low uruhm ■ r:, hi. ill.-' u c hem £' Ytaur pari on» I clinch »ci;«fHi»(t 

< BANU SlQPEn KLQ 10 40 30 orlut* i.i, II Iuiiii 

3 ■» -- Mid U0 4QM 40 It - 

2 " M 10. 40M ID|j m 

3 " NO*TH*P OEPOlE -160. BQ ifiM t13Mk*ig 
2 " SO, +OM B?M 



IfllLittM 



} II ■• 
I S4 - 
1 teptul 



1 BANK) IMCE 5JW5 ft OiP*X E - 160 thru ICM * 

" B*qidW« .tdB.^fld turtar I 00 40 £Q 1SW WllfcOUl 'j|5 

KWD JAM *Qt cgmptaf data to of #mmmd OttWr unhtu> jflHhW ■ 



■H, W9INN ANTENNAS )« 3W MH 

■ BOX 393S MT. PROSPECT. U 60Q J6 



LIGHT WEIGHT ALUMINUM TOWERS 

l'riiingutur shaped aim mm mi lowers light wdfltu. *.iroiig .unl 
rugged. Eus.il) tru reported, easily greeted, easily taken buck 
down, maintenance I ret. To 35' ftti fttndtas if bracketed at 
\& i i-r buried .1 feel in the ground Ta f50 T in height if guyed 
Towers eome in two riles, 7" wide face by #' lony Neerien&ttnJ 
II"' aide face hy (IV lonjt sections l*c as many sections as 
necessary . Collapsible lectiod! available for oversea* air ship- 
ment 

1 by »' sections- S>2 00 CA I l> 1U' ■nxutin*— S66.5l)ea. 
I . »r more mb intuitu m . wi tic to or Call: [504} S93-35-1 1 

Triangle International Tower* 
Box 1056. M unlet il le, LA "W48 *** 180 



FOR THE BEST IN LINEAR AMPLIFIERS, ANTENNA TUNERS, 
TRANSCEIVERS, METERS ETC. REPLACEMENT PARTS. FAC 
TORY SERVICE, NEW PRODUCT INFO. DOMESTIC, INTER^ 
NATIONAL DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED, 



POBoiH 
t Rockawjy. Li 
NY llSlfl, USA 
TLX 47M244 



At : i 




-263 



ry J zidjjj 2^. £ac 



54 73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 



JANUARY 28 REPLY COMMENTS OF DONALD J. SCHELLHARDT AND NICKOLAUS E. LEGGETT 

TO COMMENTS FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 



We. the undersigned, hereby file Reply Comments in response lo the January 
21, 1987 Comments of the Department of Defense (DOD). which were filed in 
opposition to our January 5 r 1987 Petition for Reconsideration in Docket No 
RM-5528. In filing these Reply Comments to DOD, we expressly reserve our 
right to file further Reply Comments in response to possible future filings in this 
Docket by other interested parties besides DOD, 

Overall Assessment of DOD's Comments 

In general, the DOD filing fits into the classic pattern of debate in this Docket 
so far One side of the debate says, in essence: "We T ve started to look into the 
EMP issue. We have a plan of action, even though virtually nothing about it is 
available to the general public, and at some point down the road you will see 
some results, Trust us. pt We continue to ask: 'If action is on I he way, then who is 
going to do what by what date? Who is going to review the work product with an 
eye to the public interest? And. if DOD and the telecom municatbns companies 
are realty committed to action, why are they hiding behind a wall of secrecy? 
Why won't they let the general puhhc look at the NSTAC study and other details 
of the plan of action that supposedly exists? Why do they resist public input? If 
there's really action underway, why are they stonewalling?*' 

Because this ground of debate is well trodden by now, our overall assessment 
is lhat DOD's filing says very little which has not already been said in GTE's 
September 11. 1986 Comments, or in Ihe December 12. 1986 decision by the 
Federal Communications Commission staff, or in both documents Due to this 
reiteration of key points made in olher documents, most of DOD's contentions 
have already been addressed by us, either in our September 24, 1SB6 Reply 
Comments to GTE t or in our Petition for Reconsideration A few of the points 
were even addressed in our initial July 30 , 1986 Petition for Notice of Inquiry, 

We will not burden the Commission with a lengthy reiteration of points we have 
already made in previous filings. Instead, we will focus upon those points raised 
by DOD which add something new to the established record. 

Responses To New Points Raised By DOD 

i On page 2 of its filing, DOD slates that While there is no dearth of 
ifitormaiion regarding EMP, as the petitioners state (Petition for Reconsider- 
ation, pp 3-4), there is also much contention regarding the impact of EMP." 

To the best of our knowledge, this is not the case. In our review of the technical 
literature on EMP, there appears to be two solid points of consensus: 1) that 
shielding and bypassing, and other protective measures, can be dramatically 
effective in reducing or eliminating vulnerability lo EMP; and 2) that unprotected 
SOtfd slate equipment is extremety vulnerable to EMP. 

While it is true that one can find differing technical opinions on the exact 
degree of vulnerability to EMP, the technical literature displays little— if any — 
disagreement over the fact of high vulnerability to EMP, 

In short, we seem to have a disagreement with DOD over what the facts are. To 
buttress our own assessment in this factual dispute, we have submitted to the 
Commission the abstracts of literally hundreds of government-sponsored stud- 
ies on EMP, We will let these studies "speak for themselves" as the Commission 
reviews them. DOD. however, has simply made the flat statement we quoted and 
then implied that classified materia! might support iis assertion. If DOD has 
evidence to support its contention, then DOD has a duly lo bring lhat evidence 
forth— in a form that would not jeopardize national security. Indeed, the Notice of 
Inquiry that we have requested would be a perfect national forum lor putting all of 
the evidence before the Commission— our evidence, DOD's evidence, GTE's 
evidence, everyone's evidence— and then letting the Commission decide what 
the facts are, with the benefit of review and participation by atl interested parties 

2. Speaking of the need to make evidence pubticly a variable, we note that 
DOD mentions— as one of the "core" constructive actions on EMP protection — 
preparation of a study on EMP by the President's National Security Telecommu- 
nications Advisory Committee (NSTAC). According to the previously referenced 
GTE Comments, which quoted from this study, it was this NSTAC document 
which triggered ongoing efforts to develop EM P equipment protection standards 
through the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). 

Strangely, this NSTAC study— which plainly plays a crucial role in guiding 
current EMP protection efforts — is not available to the general public. Instead, 
Louis Slessin, Editor of Microwave News in New York City, has had to file a 
Freedom of Information Act request m his pursuit of a copy, and at present his 
request (dated September 28, 1986) is still "under consideration." 

Actually, it is not precisely correct to say that the NSTAC study is publiciy 
unavailable; it wo u id be more accurate to say that the document is selectively 
unavailable. After all, GTE was able to quote from the NSTAC study in its 
Comments, Thus, attorneys for large telecommunications companies can ap- 
parently obtain a copy — but members of (he press cannot 

In short, when it comes to the development of EMP protection measures, DOD 
and GTE seem to want a game where everyone can play except the general 
public 

Playing the game in this manner produces results lhat the architects of our 
Republic can hardly have intended. Here we are as private citizens, exercising 
our Constitutional and statutory rights to petition our government for a "redress 
of grievances/ ' and we are told that the action we request is unnecessary due lo 
plans set forth in a NSTAC document that we are not even allowed to see 
because we are merely members of the general public Why must we private 



citizens "debate in the dark" and find ourselves excluded from the decision- 
making process? 

Now DOD and GTE are asking the Commission to perpetuate a public pohcy 
development process that is hermetically sealed against the public it is sup- 
posed to serve. If the Commission agrees, it wiil be departing from the democrat- 
ic spirit that is America's heritage, it will also be departing from its own statutory 
obligations. 

3. On page 3 of its filing, DOD maintains that "To address EMP issues in a 
formal regulatory proceeding will only stow down, and could hamper, ongoing 
EMP mitigation efforts." 

We can imagine situations where this might be the case. For example, let us 
assume that the NSTAC/ANSt participants were committed to developing a 
definite work product, by a date certain in the reasonable future, with at least 
some Commission review of the work product to assure that the public interest 
has been protected Under such circumstances, injection of regulatory proceed- 
ings could conceivably interrupt ongoing progress (although we would still face 
the problem that ihe NSTAC/AMSl group's narrow focus on telephones excludes 
action on such vital communications equipment as radios, television sets, and 
communications satellites). 

Such a set of circumstances remains hypothetical— at least at this time 
Instead of a firm commitment to action, tangibly reflected in deadlines for 
specific accomplishments, we have a vague promise of possible results, of an 
unspecified nature, at an unspecified lime. Indeed, of the DOD filing's four cited 
examples of ongoing action, one example involves equipment testing, one 
involves the NSTAC study, and two involve equipment protection standards that 
are stHi under development None of the examples has yielded as yet a tangible, 
measurable change in the vulnerability of working equipment in the real world 
Under such conditions, regulatory proceedings would not be interrupting action, 
they would be serving ihe cause of effective action by sterling key parties thai 
vague promises are not enough 

4, On page 2 of its Filing, DOD makes the following statement: "Moreover, 
because the Department of Defense relies upon commercial telecom munica* 
tions suppliers (t,e.. Civilian communication systems) for over 95% of its 
telecommunications services within the United States, significant effort has 
been made in ihe EMP area." 

DOD makes this point in an attempt to rebut our concern that efforts to protect 
military communications equipment have tended to overlook the need to protect 
civilian communications equipment. If we understand DOD correctly, it is saying 
lhat the two are largely inseparable — lhat DOD has an incentive to protect 
civilian communications systems, as well as purely military systems, because 
purely military systems carry only a tiny fraction of the military's actual communi- 
cations traffic. 

This point cuts both ways, however If the military relies on civilian communi- 
cations systems for 95% of its traffic, then the nation's military operations— not 
"just" its economic activities — would be placed in grave jeopardy if an EMP 
strike occurred under current conditions, 

In this regard, it is interesting to see that the DOD filing is made on behalf of the 
Secretary of Defense "in his capacity as Executive Agent for the National 
Communications System." This same National Communications System has 
issued a detailed report on EMP. The report, entitled "Electromagnetic Pulse/ 
Transient Threat Testing of Protection Devices for Amateur/Military Affiliate 
Radio System Equipment" (NCS TI6 85-10), is fortunately available to the 
public. It mentions, among many other conclusions, that older civilian telephone 
equipment is relatively resistant to EMP— but is generally being replaced by 
solid stale equipment that is highly vulnerable to EMP. A condensed version of 
part ot this report was published in the August 1986 edition of OS T magazine, 
and was formally submitted to this Commission as Exhibit H of the GTE Com- 
ments. On page 20 of the magazine, the article states that "The commercial 
telephone system consists, in large pari, of unshielded telephone switches and 
cable systems In recent years, the tefephone companies have started using 
solid-state switching systems that could be highly sensitive to EMP," 

In short, it appears that the military has in large part tied itself lo the civilian 
communications system. In the words of an agency for which the Secretary of 
Defense is "Executive Agent." this civilian communications system "could be 
highly sensitive to EMP." 

By clear implication, our nation's military must be in the same boat 

On balance, then, the information supplied by DOD strengthens the case for 
actions on civilian communications systems. Because military communications 
and civilian communications are so intermingled, it now appears that an EMP 
strike might devastate more than <l just p1 the nation's economy. 

This point should not be lost on a Commission whose statutory charter 
explicitly mentions protection of the national defense as one of the Commis- 
sion's duties. 

Conclusion 

For the reasons set forth in this filing and in our previous filings, we urge the 
Commission to grant our Petition for Reconsideration and to proceed expedi- 
tiously with a Notice of Inquiry on the crucial subject of Electromagnetic Pulse. 

Donald J, Schellhardt 
Nickotaus E. Leggett 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 55 



Tech Talk from ICOM 



_ICOM 



Performance, Reliability, and Customer Support: 



The Winning Team 



■ jM m hile attractive front 
mm ^W panels and impressive 
™ ^» magazine advertise- 
ments may initially glamorize any 
amateur radio item, they can also 
reflect the classic proverb of beau- 
ty being only skin deep, The fa- 
vorable returns from any unit and 
the success of its manufacturer, 
however, are directly influenced 
by after-purchase reliability 
and factory-backed service. 
Knowledge of such performance 
records and readily available cus- 
tomer support encourage the 
peace of mind to use and enjoy a 
new unit to its maximum poten- 
tial. 

ICOM considers the aspect of 
service from two interrelated 
standpoints: daily in-field use and 
possible "down the tine" repairs 
if, and when, needed. This con- 
cept is pursued by first building 
professional communications 
quality and reliability Into 
every unit, confidently backrng it 
with a full warranty, then sub- 
stantiating that dependability 
with uncompromised factory 
authorized service and custom- 
er support. All ICOM HF trans- 
ceivers and shortwave receivers 
reflect that philosophy with their 
full one-year war ramies... and 
service centers that are not bot- 
tlenecked with backlogs (stout 
performers simply give less trou- 
blej. ICOM isn't playing down 
customer support, but building a 
positive long-term reputation on 
itl 

Today's era of advanced tech- 
nology and seemingly endless 
consumers tends to replace old- 



time "concerned treatment" with 
attitudes of "being one of a vast 
number in line." Returning a unit 
for adjustment or repair and later 
attempting to check its status 
sometimes proves to be a frustrat- 
ing experience. While no one is 
infallible, ICOM honestly strives 
to avoid an attitude of "too many 
customers to provide congenial 
service/ 1 ICOM's customer serv- 
ice hotline at (206) 454-7619, for 
example, will put you directly in 
touch with the main service de- 
partment The only prerequisite is 
mutual understanding in shar- 
ing this resource so everyone can 
have queries answered and ra- 
dios repaired. If a problem can't 
be alleviated via telephone, 
ICOM strives for a service center 
"turnaround time" of three to five 
days. 

Continuing that customer 
support, ICOM Is the only ama- 
teur radio company with four 
factory-owned service centers 
In North America. The centers 
are located in Atlanta, Georgia; 
Dallas, Texas; Bellevue, Washing- 
ton; and Vancouver, British Co- 
lumbia. Most ICOM service cen- 
ters are also situated near major 
airports to further minimize trans- 
portation problems. 

The amateur radio industry 
Is ICOM's major interest; it's not 
a sideline or spin-off of other pur- 
suits. ICOM doesn't manufacture 
stereos, VCRs, or televisions. 
ICOM is communications indus- 
try oriented with secondary in- 
volvement in top quality marine, 
land mobile, and avionics equip- 
ment 



The stouthearted reliability of 
ICOM equipment is continuously 
praised in testimonial letters from 
proud owners. A few samples 
from those "believe it or not" files 
include stories of transceivers lit- 
erally drowned in salt water two 
or three hours, yet continuing to 
operate flawlessly... of no failures 
to date in the IC-735 and IC-751 
power amplifiers. ..of handheld 
transceivers dropped from tow- 
ers, and one was even run over by 
a truck{ I J, yet continued to oper- 
ate after outer case repairs (fortu- 
nately, ICOM handhelds include 
a separate metal frame to protect 
PC boards and a high impact plas- 
tic "outer case"J. 

The next time you switch on a 
deluxe HF transceiver, compact 
VHF mobile rig or handheld FM 
unit, pause a couple of seconds 
and think about its less apparent 
aspect of customer support and 
service. Who would you call if a 
problem arose, what would be 
their attitude, and approximately 
how long might you anticipate 
being off the air? If you Ye a proud 
ICOM owner, those answers are 
reassuring rather than aggravat- 
ing. 

Again, ICOM's dedication to 
top performance, exceptional reli- 
ability and unsurpassed customer 
support may not be visible on a 
front panel or in a colorful ad, but 
they're included in every (COM 
Item. ICOM equipment is simple 
to use and the best in quality. It's 
"Simply the Best" and an increas- 
ing number of amateurs are prov- 
ing that statement in their setups 
every day. Isn't it time you, too, 
joined the ICOM winning team? 






ICOM America, Inc., 2380~J16th Ave. NE, Bellevue, WA. 98004 Customer Service Hotlfne {206) 454-7619 

3150 Premier Drive, Suite 126, Irving, TX 75063 / 1777 Phoenix Parkway, Suite 201, Atlanta, GA 30349 

[COM CANADA A Division of ICOM America, Inc. 3071 - #5 Road, Unit 9, Richmond, RC V6X 2T4 Canada 



THE IC-735 
F TRANSCEIVER 






r 






■ ■ , ., 



****«^fI3,-B 







***«*» *uei« 



««ttf tWrtmt,^ 



w, 



*^> tfrlT 



rti tnj| 






nnwrs 



r ^i ■, - 



Ml Ml 




BUY YOUR HF FOR PERFORMANCE 

NOT BY THE POUND 



9 



• All HF Band Transceiver/ 

• Genera] Coverage Receiver 

• HM-12 Scanning Mic Included 

• 12 Memories/Frequency and 
Mode 

• 105dB Dynamic Range 

• All Modes Built-in USB, LSB, 
AM, FM P CW 

The IC-735 is a heavyweight when 
you compare features and performance. 
Other transceivers may weigh more than 
the advanced IC-735 compact HF trans- 
ceiver, but inch -for- inch and pound-for- 
pound. the IC-735 outweighs them all. 

Ultra Compact. Measures only 3.7 
Inches high by 9.5 inches wide by 9 
inches deep and weighs only I L I pou nds, 
Without question, the IC-735 is the best 
HF transceiver for mobile, marine or 
base station amateur operation* 

All Amateur Band Coverage. It's a 

high performer on all the ham bands, 
plus it includes general coverage recep- 
tion from 100kHz to 30MHz. May be 

easily modified for MARS operation. 



12 Memories. Frequency and MODE 
may be easily stored and retrieved in the 
12 tunable memories. 

Exceptional Receiver. To enhance 
receiver performance, the IC-735 has a 

built-in receiver attenuator, preamp. 
and noise blanker. PLUS it has a !05dB 
dynamic range and a technologically 
advanced low-noise phase locked loop 
for extremely quiet rock-solid reception. 

Simplified Front Panel Controls 
which require infrequent adjustment are 
placed behind a unique hatch cover on 
the front panel of the radio. The hatch 
cover is designed to protect seldom 
used controls from being accidentally 
knocked off line, but also provides easy 
access. The large LCD readout and con- 




WIDE 



5EMI WAMJAt 



veniently located controls enable easy 
operation, especially important for the 
mobile environment 

More Features. FM built-in, HM-12 
scanning mic, program scan, mode scan 
and memory scan Switchable AGC 

automatic SSB selection by band and 
RF speech processor, Continuously 
adjustable output power up to 100 watts, 
1 2V operation, 1 00% duty cycle and deep 
tunable notch filter. 

Options. A new line of accessories 
are available, including the AH-2 mobile 
antenna system, AT- 150 whisper quiet 
automatic bandswitching antenna tuner 
for base station operation and the PS-55 
power supply. The IC-735 is also com- 
patible with most of ICOM's existing line 
of HF accessories. 

See the IC-735 performance heavy- 
weight at your local authorized [COM 
dealer. 




ICOM 

Eire! in Communications 




ICOM America, fnc. 2380-1161H Ave NE T Bellevue, WA 98004 / 3150 Premier Drive, Suite 126. Irving, TX 75063 
ICOM CANADA. A Division of ICOM America, Inc., 3071 - #5 Road. Unit 9, Richmond, B.C. VSX 2T4 Canada 

All stated specifications are approximate and subject to change without notice or obligation, ah ICOM radios significantly exceed FCC regulations (uniting spurious emissions. 7351066 



Hamilton Worked 




EGE VIRGINIA 
13645 Jefferson Davis Highway 
Woodtiridge, Virginia 22191 
Lntormalion: (703) 643-1063 
Service Department; (703) 494-8750 

Store Hours: 

M-TM: 10a.m.-B pro 
F 10 am — S p m 
Sat: 1EJa m —4 pm 

Qrd«r Hours: M-F 9 a m -7 p M 
Sal TO a m -4 p m 

EGE NEW ENGLAND 

8 Sines Road 

Satem New Hampshire 03079 
New Hampshire Orders,* 
Information & Service (603j 898-3750 
or call 800-336 4799 

Slore Hours; 

MTWSat: 10 a m -4 p.m 
ThF: 12 noon-8 p m 

•Order and we'fi credit you $1 lor [he call 

Spring 

Buyer's Guide 

Catalog Available 

-Send S1 



^DISTRIBUTOR 

Our associate store 

Davis & Jackson Road P Sox 253 

LacamDe. Louisiana 70445 
Informaiion & Service (&Q4) 882-5355 



I l 

Oncovin: 

I 1 



You'll find us in Timonium, Maryland, March 28 & 29 







_M- 




r 1 

L A 




i -^^ i -^^ 



Terms: ft pefsewt ctw*s acceprec 
Prices tfa not mctuoe tttpptng UPS 
COD let $2 3b av pzangt Prices are 
Strict ID Change mthotif *c?<p qt 
#*9«Mn ftahiffi *e *W i&G re/ 
f*#u*ft©o Authentic Winns #t 
sypf#tf /o a T5H tesntkiflQ am* 
iUfl0frng fee antf c*e&t mil H isstmS 
tor use oo /nur w*f jjurcAas* EGE 
Supports ins manutiaur&n ' mrrafl 
1m Jo get a copy of a warranty prior 
\0 purcltass, call CiiStQfntf swvtCS at 
?Q3*643~tQ63 and \t wit he furnished 
If no cost 

Dealer inquires invited 

Hard to get 

through on our 

800 number? 

Cm tetoe Warn or tfm b p ~ 

or CJ" one PI cut tegutdf ntrfrrfwrs 

m pay to/ |fi * m" a^d ec**. 
«*7f tfeti.'i ptRif order Mksit) $i 



BEARCAT 




lODKL iS-crianngJ fraud held 


IS&95 


600XLT 40-ch SOtiM" 


319 0G 


•! r§th I0oa«0 


99 95 


I >6 tP< with j»rc= 


(54 95 


M)KL *0 -ctt rtandheitl 


[20 00 


2 TO'- 


t»95 


UNIDEN 




Kiev Ottecssrs 


Can 


CfiHrfiDS 


Call 


SONY 




300? ■■- =ecEfffl? 


?■ 


?®l05Wl Secern 


310 95 


J«9I0SW] Receiver 


89 ft 


PANASONIC SWL 


LAI- 


COBRA CBs/RAfiAN 


DETECTORS 


MIDLANDCBs 


CALL 


WHISTLER ^AOAfl 


bCTORS 





Micro 2AT 

Mint 2m Harrcttvetd 

Now in stock 



IC751A 

HP Transceiver wrh 
General Coverage. fteceive r 



Li - • 



/: 



ms: 



NEW 
IC 12AT 

for 1.Z-GH/ 



IC 3200 
2tn'M4fj WHzMobtte. 






w 



* -■_* Tfc.rf H^T » 

O O ^- " 



IC 745 

Hf l;n receiver. wan 
G^n&ral Coverage Receiver: 



rtfifti 



J i-Ai 



IC 02AT/04AT 

Handnelc tor ?rr MHl 



R 7000 
Genera' Coverage Est * i. er 



HARDWARE 

MFJ 1224 with MFJ C-64/V20 Soil B5.95 

MFJNbw12?9 159.9& 

K an iromes i nr*rtace tl £ 1 9& 

K^rttfopwes UTU interlace i§9 95 

KantrdiikcsUTU-XT 379 95 

H&n Wicftfog ART-l Call 

Kanlronics Hamtexl 

■ ,'D C t Cai 

KanironJcs Hamsoli 

Vic-?3. Apple A1OT.TI-9S Can 

Kantronics Hamsoft/Amtor 

■;n M C 64. Alan fi9 95 

Kantronics AmtorsoM 

vii '■:■ i m 7y ■ 

ftppm iifl.95 

Microlog Air Disk 

■ C-64 Pi 39 95 

CaMnu 56 95 



PACKET 

MFJ lZrUPjtkel 

ma Packet PKT? 

Mew KaniiorticsKAM 
Kjnir£im^MfC?4Q0 
Kanironits ?400 r»iC Uodem 

CaII tot Models 
and Price Quotes 



129 95, 

154 



DBTfl 



Amateur Soltwere 
tor the VIC 20 and 
Commodore 64 
Soeotv tape W QM 



Cnntest tmj 

Ametina Dei 
Computer Mots^ 
PrDpagation Charl 
Suoer i. ' i 
Net Contrail w 
DJtTeo] k ir 
Mast er i, rwj i fl^> i 



16'' 
19 55 
16 5! 



?4 95 
28 95 







R S000 

General Coverage fecayer- 

NEW TH-205AT 

2ft> 5- Watt Handheld 




TS 940S 

HF Trahscfi[iver;..wJtft 

Genefat L ^ge Receiver 




TH-215AT 

rr, FV'HancihcSrJ 



TS 430S 

Hf Transceiver w<^. 

* 

rjEW LOW PfflCE - 



EXTENDED 
SERVICE 

AGREEMENTS 
AVAILABLE 



■ I ■ 






H^^flfl HIT 






* 1 



•:- 



v.yO _. _st 



^ =3i7Tr 



SPECtAL 
PACKAGE 
>EALS FOR 
NOVICES 

Radios /Antennas 
;all ioi in1( 



Mew TS 440 



Your Factory 
Authorized Service 

Center lor fcom, 
yaesu t & Kenwood 

ECf effflffi «x*#nded service 

contracts on Yaesu, Kenv/ood, 

and icom products Pnces horn 

StO-25 Ask to/ details 



TE SYSTEMS 

F AMPLIFIERS 

Willi receive 

GaAs FET Preamplifier 

for superior weak stgnal 

reception with improved 

strong signal 

mtermod reiection 




tit! 



HlOGPmAmptOWm-lfiODLjl 309 00 
l l'2G2mAmp 30Wm-»60 out 269 00 
44lOG440Amp iQWirt-tOOoul 309 00 
44t2G440Am[i3QW^-lQOoui 309 00 



For Orders and Quotes Call Toll Free: 800-336-4799 

In New England (except NH) Call 800237-OO47 In Virginia Call 800572-4201 



All Quagmires 

You 7/ find us in Dayton, Ohio, April 24-26 





SANTEC 




FT 7S7GX 

Hf Tran stiver with 
Getiera* Covfirage Receiver 



FT209RH 



NEW FT 727R 
*Q UHz Dual 6a r 

NEW FT23/73 Palmate 

2m/ 440 MHz Mmi HancJheids 




NEW FT 767GX 

All Mads Transceiver 

r(h CAT System 




FRG 6800 

Genera! Coverage Receiver 

All mode 150kH2-3GMHz 



FRG 9600 
Scanning Receiver 
60-905 MHzFM/ AM /SSB 



ASK FOR 
QUOTES ON 

RADIO/ 

ACCESSORY 

PACKAGES 



ST20T 

2m HI 




FM240 2m. 25-watT 



irar 



N-TEC 



CORSAIR II Model 561 




RX-325 Short Wave Receiver 

Mobile HF Antennas 
Call for Ten-Tec Prices 



ANTENNAS & TOWERS 



Unarco-Rohn 




CUSHCRAFT 

A3 3 element! 0-15-20m 217 95 

K4 i eiffDfiPl 1 0- 1 5 20m 2S2 95 

H3 1 0- * 5-2Qm Vesical 3 68 95 

215WB SSB/FM 2rn Boomer $2 95 

ARX-2B 2m Rirga Ranger 36 SO 

42lfl](L 2m Boomer 103 95 

1D-4C10 J -element 10m in 95 

l5-4C0 4-elernent 15m 125 95 

4 Q ■ 2C D 2-eiern ent 4 Om 296 9 5 
Diner C-ushcralt models avrinabla CALL 

KLM 

KT34A 4-eleTtiem i0-iV2flm Call 

KT34XA E-eiemenl 10 15-20m Call 

?m-tix n-eienKfil2m Cat 

5m- f 5LSX i§-etement 2m Call 

432 30LBX 30-efe 440 MMi t=" 

F«w jtes mast 5* da- 

"fliass mas 7' Ca 

MOSLEY 

CL 13 3-e*emefi? Tn&and; 8earn 265 95 

33 3*e*eme-- • '^-2flm 239 95 

Pro 3? 7 efement l0-l5-2flm 465 95 

PfO 5? 10-12-15-1 ?-20m 465 95 

Pro 17 ?0- 1 2-1 5- 1 7-2<MOm 579 95 

HUSTLER 

8-8TV 10-BQm Vertical' wi-IH3Qin 12895 

5 RTV I fl-B0m Vertical 108 95 
4-B TV i0-40m Vertical 87.95 
G6-44P 440 MHz Base Vertical 99 95 
&7-144 Z-melerBaseVeMical 115 95 
flE- 1 44 B 2m Base Vertical a 7 95 
M0»UMO-2 Masts 2150 
BW-l Bumper MtMftl 14.95 
WGBlLl PESONATOtlS Slanttan) Suner 
10 and 15 meler 95 17 95 
20meie'S 15 50 ?i 85 
30 and 40 meters 1 7 95 25 95 
75mele-5 19 95 36 9& 

HY-GAJN ANTENNAS 

391$ TH70K T-ete HM5-20M CALL 

393S TOOX S^eie t<M5 20m CALL 

395SE»plareri4HM5-?0m CALL 

20 3S 3 tOemtit 2-metef Beam C A 

20BS 8 feme" 1 2-mett* Beam C AIL 

214$ 1 4- element ?■ meter Beam Call 

BNS& Beam BaEun call 

V2S 2 meter Ventcai CALL 

V4S 440 MHf Vertical CALL 

MORE ANTENNAS 

AVANTI MM 151 3G 2m0rvgla$$ 32.50 

LAftSEN l M-150 5/a Wag Mount 39 95 

HMIII.RNLITHF6V 10-Wm Ven 1 19.95 

BUTTERNUT HF4fl 2-ele B&am 189 95 

BUTTERNUT 2MCV5 2m 42 75 

VOCOM 5/8 wave 2m Handheld 1 5 95 

ANTENNAS FOR OSCAR 

C 1* 5 ne rait 4 1 6TB Twlsi 59 95 

Cushcrstt A144HJT io-*t 53 3a 

crattAl«20T20-eli 95 

Cus rscratt AOP1 Pac kage 1 4 9 95 

»flM2m-T4C2rnl4^eDrcutat 88 §5 

*LM435-T8C te^e Ore Polar 111 19 

HL M 2m 22C 22-efe Ciix 2m tQ9 00 



Limited Quantities 

SeH supporting lowers: 

HBX40 40-feel wlEtlBa&e 209 9:. 

HBX48 48-reel wilh Base 279.95 

HBX5G 56-lftfit with Ban 349.95 

HOBX40 Higher load wltti Base 259.95 
HDBX48 Higher lead wiln Base 339 9 & 

Other SX t HBX, HDBX in stock 
Guyed foldover lowers: 
FK255S 58 -leer 25G 940 00 

FK4554 54 leei 45G 1296.00 

Other sues it stmriar sevmgs 
Foktoms ssmpea tttnjm pan* 
W% mgner »*si at sne Rockies 

Straight Sections: 

2CG F traight Sechon 39 95 

25G Straight Secww 49 95 

*5G Sfat^hi S«t/wi 1 to 95 

Complete Tower Packages: 

25G 4SG 

w can • 

50" Calk Can 

60' Call Call 

Each package miutfes top section . muf 
secti&j, base, rotor sneif, guy brackets, 
guy wtre, iwtibtiGktos. eqwtuer plam, 
guy anchors, catito clamps, ttimoies. 
Ask about substitutions and custom 
deserts Tower packages are sntppeti 
freight coitect FQB our warehouse 

HY-GAIN TOWERS 
HG37SS 37*1«t tan CALL 

HG52SS 52-180TU11 CALL 

HG54HD54rael/taghef load CAU 

HG7DHO 60 letl t higher uao CAU. 

Onisr Hy-G*tn tomer Hy-G&r antenna 
ancf tiy-Gain rom am recede 
tree $fw&*9 on m 



ri-ix 



W36 36-teena ™ 548 00 

WT5t51lee1la» 929 00 

I M354 54 leet >' rug htf Idait f 575 00 

ShtQQ*aq noi trKtueed Shipped tfitect 

(mm factory bJSWi *QU money 

PHILLYSTRAN CALL 

CABLE BY SAXTON 

RB213MilSper 29'/tl 

RG8/U FQam95*A SNlflld 25*/tl 

B'WKefl&taior 2 #18 6 #2? 17'/!l 

Witii-8 95 H Shield 13 r /11 

Cablewave Hardline CALL 

ROTATORS 

Di3*3 Rotaiors available CALL 

Alliance HO 73 1D9 95 

tiy-GaHi Ham IV CALL 

fiy-Gam Tamwtstef l f 31 CAU 

Hy-Ga«i Heavy Hhit* 300 C ALL 

«eno^^R50aE»«*»ft«i»fliaSEy 199 95 

Reoprc #(R5400 «mm /elevat 329 95 




MIRAGE 

B23A2mAmplr!ier2-3a 120 95 

Bl 016 2m Amplifier 10- 1 &0 ?49 95 
B30 IB 2m Amplifier 30 -160 ■< 95 

D10UJ 10- 100 Amp tor 430-50 ?99 95 

DiOIONUHFAmp/NconneclOFS 299.95 

B2lh?mAm{i: 2m. i^Oout 249.9i 

Al0l5 6mArnp 10 m. 150 out 259.9ft 

AMERITRON HF AMPS 
ATRit. Am Tuner 1500 wait Call 

AT RiO AM Tuner I kW Call 

RC38 Hemote Cqbr Switch Can 

NEW Al 1200 1 5kWAmp Cjl 

\ E W AL BOA 1 200 wart Amp Ca 

ALB4HF Amp T6015 CaU 

AMP SUPPLY 

IATO0CA 160 1 5m Amp Can 

LK bQQl BK t hF Amp n@ tune Can 

AT 120OA 1200 P£p Tune? CaH 

LK 50QZC 2 5 *W riiperal Call 



This is a partial ttsl— 

IF YOU DONT SEE 

WHAT YOU WANT CALL 



DAIWA 

LA-20G5A 2rn Amp, 2 to fifleul 
LA-2D35R 2m Amp witfi preAmp 



25.95 
74 35 



VOCOM AMPLIFIERS 
2 wans in 30 wans qui ?<ii Amp 69 95 
2 wans m 60 waits qui 2m Amp 1 07 95 
? walls m 1 2Q watt* qu* ?m Amp 1^9 95 

?0T>TiWifi 30 watis out 2m Amp 84 95 



KENWOOD 1 L 9?2 2kW 



CALL 



ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 



H5 /A 

RSt?A 

RS2QA 

RS3SA 

3S50A 



^ '- 



J 33 95 
389 95 



RS20M 
RS35M 
VS20W 
VS35W 
RS50M 



104K 
149 95 
124 95 
169 95 
209 95 



BENCHER PADDLES 
Black/Chrome 5195/6195 

B&W 

375 6'PQSillon Coax Swrlch 24 50 

37fi 5'pasillon COsx Switch 24 5Q 

425 1 kW Low Pass Filter 26 50 

fi93 3-posilien Coax Switch 25 25 

595 6-oosilitift Coat Switch 29 95 

AP- 10 5-Pand Ajaartment Antenna 39 95 
370-15 Air band Drtroie Antenna 129 95 
-IJiher antennas in stock - 

DAIWA 

CH 52&/CN-540 M«ers 59 95/69 95 
NS 660A SKVfi^att Meter 134 95 

330 Meier i?fi 00 

: '. 7208 2*W «F Walt Meter 1 ?0W 
PlW-415 Antertra tuner 500 W 1 7^ 
OIII518 AJilrnna T u nef 2 5 kW 271- 
CN4TMI SWR " wt mrr 3 5-150 MHz 64 95 
CS201 ? posrlion Swiicn 21 95 

C S40 1 4 pest nan Switch 64 95 



TELEX HEADPHONES AMPHENOL CONNECTORS 

Procom 350 uifraiighi sei 
Procorn 250 soft phone /mike 
Procom 450 padded phones 
Procom 100 desk mike 
Pronom 160 padded phones 
SWL FilGlighl headphone 
C 610 ligm headphone 
Oihers in slock 



BIG DISCOUNTS 



MFJ PRODUCTS 
989 3 *W Anteiraa Tuner 295 95 

96? t 5 kW Tiifler switch 'meter 189 $5 
949C 300- wan Delu«e Tuner 129 95 
cm D 30O- wan Tuner sweh/ mete? 89 95 
1 020A Active Antenna 69 95 

2023 ftoae Bridge* 48 95 

"526 Dual f unatfe SSfi/CW Filter n 95 
KeyffS-407 422. 484 CALL 

Other MFJ products in stock CALL 



56 95 


83lSPPL259Silvef 


1 25 


72 


B31SP 1050 NrctKi PI75S 


0.95 


35.50 


82B1 Type N «G8 


2 50 


49 95 


^OOS0239-SMC 


2.99 


37 20 


311PBNCRG59 


1 35 


8 75 


3l2 6NCRG5fl 


1.25 


7.95 


83185 Reducer Hi 


025 


Please Call 


8316B Reducer flG59/mini 8 


25 


TC 


831RUHF panel 


79 



For Orders and Quotes CaU Toll Free: 800-336-4799 

In New England (except NH) Calf 800-237-0047 In Virginia CaU 800572-4201 



Special titscounts on f QQ-ptete purchases 




alinco RAD/OS 

POWER SUPPLIES 

AMPLIFIERS 




Boost Your Contest Power! 



THE NEW LK SOOZC 

This self-contained, full QSK high frequency linear power amplifier 
is capable of amateur continuous operation at output power levels of 
1500 watts It js manually tunable from 1.8-2.4 and 3 5-22 MHz 
continuous The HF tank co+l and Cfcntralab bandswitch are 
silver-plated 

INTERNAL POWER SL PPL* 

All 500 Series amplifiers have a Peter Oahl Hipersil plate 
transformer and a separate filament transformer The fullwave bridge 
rectifier system— unlike other systems thai utilize weak voltage 
doubters— uses computer grade electrolytic capacitors 

COMPATIBILITY GUARANTEED 

Customer feedback >n 1986 insisted on system compatibility 
Responding to this challenge, a special Rug and Ray Harness to 
hook your favorite radio to the LK500 is offered as an accessory Of 
course. aJI Amp Supply amplifiers have our famous AH-6 tuned input 
systems, assuring a perfect 50 ohm toad to your transceiver 
AUTOMATIC LOCK OLTT "NEW 

All the new LK-500ZC Series amplifiers afe equipped with the ALO 
which stops amplifier operation when rt senses an unacceptable SWR 
improper tuning, or overcurrent on the tubes. 

2 SPEED FANS 

Most manufacturers have had to compromise on fan speed, one of 
the noisiest and objecttonabJe aspects of amateur radao operation But 
our 500 Series amplifiers are different; they are the result of our 
perfected system of customer communication and engineer response 

THE LK-SOOZC WITH OUT QSK 

A version of the 500ZC is available without the Jennings vacuum 
antenna changeover relay and a companion sealed relay QSK 
system A super buy at $1 199 00' 

THE LK-500NTC NO-TONE 

Our no-tune amphfier is the same dependable amplifier as the LK- 
SOOZC with the new ALO system and full QSK, and completes our 
popular 500 Series This desirable version allows you to merely switch 
to your favorite amateur band and transmit at full power Vsfe have 
preset internal capacitors and coils for each of the traditional six 
amateur bands The LK-500NTC is also available for special MARS 
and commercial channelized frequencies 




W t^^«^ 



THE G5RV ANTENNA R*P*. *6«KOO SMJE $*fh50 

The G5RV Signal Injector™ antenna & an excellent all band (3.5-30 
MHz} 102 ft dipote On 1 8 MHz the center and shield of the coax at 
the transmitter end may be joined together and the antenna may be 
used as a Marconi with a tuner and a good earth ground The proper 
combination of a 102 ft flat -top and 31 ft of 300 ohm tranmtssion tine 
achieves resonance on all the amateur bands from 80 to 10 meters 
with onty one antenna There is no loss in traps and coils. The 
impedance present at the end of the 300 ohm line is about 50-60 
ohms, a good match to the new RG8X mini foam coax 

• 2 KW PEP 

• Completely assembled 

• Use as horizontal or " V configuration 

• Consists of 102 ft copper antenna wire. 31 ft. 300 ohm 
transmisison line, 70 ft RG-8X coax. 2 end insulators, t center 
insulator, 1 PL-259 and sleeve, connector and the new 
transformer coupler. 



"VMO 




Ofil 



SPECIFICATIONS LK 500ZC 

Frequency Range: 160 Meters 18-2 2 MHz, 80 meters 3 5-4 5 

MHz, 40 meters 7 0^7 5 MHz, 30 meters 10 1 to 10 15 MHz, 20 meters 

14.0*14 9 MHz. 17 meters 18.0-19.2 MHz T 15 meters 21 0-21 5 MHz. 

Export models 12 meters 24.8-24 9 MHz. 10 meters 28 0-29 7 MHz 

Drive Power: 100W Nominal for 1500 Wstt SSB PEP output. 125W 

Nominal for 1 500 Watt CW output 

MF Output SSB 1 5 KW PEP continuous, CW 1 2 KW Average 

continuous. RTTY. SSTV 1 KW Average 15 KW PEP 

Plate Voltage: BTTY/AM/SSTV/CW/SSB 3.2 KV DC 

Harmonic Suppression: -50 dB minimum 

Intel-modulation Distortion Products: -33 dB down minimum 

Circuit type; Class Aft grounded grid. Type of Emission: SSB, CW, 

RTTY, AM, SSTV 

Duty Cycle: Amateur continuous duty in all modes at specified 

output 

Output Circuit: Pi-network (silver plated tubing HF coil) 

Power Requirements: 115/230 VAC. 30/15 amps (230 VAC factory 

wired and recommended), 

Dimensions: 8* H x 14* W x 16* D (including knobs) 

UPS Shippabie: 59 lbs 

Warranty: Two years on amplifier 



LK-500ZC Full QSK 

LK-SOOZC Without QSK . , 

LK-SOONTC No-lune Version , 

Plug & Play Harness (Specify your radioj 
AI3000 Matching Mt luner 



$1595-00 
$1199.00 
$1695.00 
. $ 9.95 
$ 499.00 



Add an automatic SWR lock-out brain to your present amplifier 
(any brand) Self contained plug and play 

A1A. I Accessory »«»»* ,....«> s> y4.jO 



Trade in amps accepted Reconditioned and guaranteed trade-in 
amps available We now have a full line of wire antenna and 
accessories 



Order Today. 

For f«tte*t delivery, ttnd cuhttrt check, money 
order, or onkr by credit cwd PtrunaJ chrck*. 
■itow IB doyi To dtif North Caroline ntidenTi, 
idd 4vi% tifn l*t Hours Monday- Friday 9 00 
5:00 p.m. E. S X 




Shipping and handling $4 on any Amp product. 



Call 819-821-5518 

208 Snow Ave., P.O. Box H7 
Raleigh. North Carolina 27602 

919-821-5518 
Telex: 980131WDMR 



Amp 



Supply Co. 



190 



New Product: LK 550 using three 3-500Zs. 
Call today. LK 450 using one 3-500Z. 



60 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1 987 




ARTER "N" BUY 



MILITARY TECHNICAL MANUALS 
for old and obsolete equipment. 60- 
page catalog. S3 Military Technical 
Manual Service, 2266 Senasac Ave,, 
Long Beach CA 90615. BNB045 

MARINE RADIO; Marconi Canada CH- 
125 synthesized AWSSB transceiver, 
22 channels on 4, 8. and 12 MHz. 125 
Watts, 12 V dc Never used, list $1,995. 
asking SI, 495. Stj Norwood. 70 Rte, 
202 North, Peterborough NH 03458. 
BNB047 

QSLs to order. Variety of styles, colors, 
card stock. W4BPD QSLs, PO Drawer 
DX. Cordova SC 29039, BN8260 

THE DXERS MAGAZINE. Up-to-date 
informative, interesting. Compiled and 
edited by Gus Browning W4BPD. 
OXCC Honor Roll Certificate 2-4 
Send for free sample and subscription 
information today, PO Drawer DX, 
Cordova SC 29039- BNB261 

IMRA— International Mission Radio 
Association. Forty countries, 800 
members. Assists missionaries with 
equipment loaned* weekday nei. 
14.280 MHz, 2-3 p.m. Eastern. Broth- 
er Bernard Frey, 1 Pryer Manor Road, 
Larchmont NY 10538 BNB326 

RADIO TRANSCRIPTION DISCS 
WANTED. Any s^e, speed. WTFlZ— 
WG, Box 724, Redmond WA 98073- 
0724, BNB347 

XEROX MEMOflYWRITER— parts, 
assemblies, boards, manuals, Free 
help with service problems. W6NTH, 
Box 250, Benton AR 72015; (501 )- 776- 
0920. BNS404 

HAM TRADER YELLOW SHEETS, in 

our 24th year. Buy, swap, sell ham- 
radio gear, Published twice a month. 
Ads quickly circulate — no long wait for 
results. SASE for sample copy. $!2 for 
one year (24 issues). PO Box 2057. 
Glen Ellyn IL 60138-2057. BNB412 



QSL CARDS— Look good with top 
quality printing. Choose standard de- 
signs or fully customized cards. Better 
cards mean more returns to you. Free 
brochure, samples. Stamps appreciat- 
ed. Chester QSLs. Dept A. 310 Com- 
mercial; Emporia KS 66801 . BNB434 

YAESU OWNERS— Hundreds Of mod- 
ifications and improvements for your 
ng. Select the best from 14 years of 
genuine top-rated Fox-Tango Newslet- 
ters by using our new 32-page Cumula- 
tive Index. Only $5 postpaid (cash 
or check) with $4 rebate certificate 
creditable toward newsletter purchas- 
es, Includes famous Fox-Tango Filler 
and Accessories Lists. Mift L Owens 
N4ML (Editor). Box 15944. W Palm 
Beach FL 33416; (305J-683-9587. 
BNB448 

TOWER CLIMBING SAFETY BELTS 

and accessories Free specs Avatar 
Magnets W9JVF, 1 147 N. Emerson #7. 
Indianapolis IN 46219-2929. BNB458 

FIND OUT what else you can hear on 
your general-coverage transceiver or 
receiver. Join a shortwave radio listen- 
ing club. Complete information on 
major North American clubs and sam- 
ple newsletter $ 1 . Association of North 
American Radio Clubs, PO Box 462, 
Northfield MN 55057. BNB464 

"HAMLOG" COMPUTER programs. 
17 modules auto-logs, sorts 7-band 
WAS/DXCC, Full-feature editing, 
Apple $14.95. IBM or CP/M $24.95. 
Much more. KA1AWH, PO Box 2015. 
Peabody MA 01960 BNB467 

WANTED: Old Western Electric, RCA T 
Tele fun ken, Mcintosh, Marantz. Dyna- 
co, Tannoy. Attec— tubes , amplifiers, 
speakers. Maury Corb. 11122 ArweH. 
Houston TX 77096; (713)-728-4343 
BNB479 



r 



Barter N 1 Buy advertising must pertain to ham radio products or services. 

n Individual (noncommercial) 25^ per word 

^Commercial . . 60c per word 

Prepayment required Count onfy the words tn me text. Your address is 
free. 73 cannot verify advertising claims and cannot be held responsible 
for claims made by the advertiser. Liability will be Hrmted to making any 
necessary corrections in the next available issue. Please print clearly or 
type (double-spaced). 



"1 



No discounts or commissions are available. Copy must be received tn 
Peterborough by Ihe fifth of the second month preceding the cover date. 
Make checks payable to 73 Magazine and send to Hope Currier, 73 
Magazine. WGE Center, Peterborough NH 03458. 



LEARN CODE on your IBM PC (or 
compatible), Commodore C-64/128, or 
Macintosh CODE -PRO takes you from 
no knowledge to proficient copy. 
Specify computer, $10 plus $2 s&h 
Trio Technology, Dept 961. PO Box 
402, Palm Bay FL 32906. BNB490 

POST CARD QSL KIT— Converts post 
cards, photos to QSLs! Stamp brings 
circular K-K Labels, PO Box 412; Troy 
NY 12181-0412. BNB496 

CITIZEN BAND OPERATORS! Join 
the newest club around Club benefits 
include power and modulation mods, a 
CB trader sheet, official number. CBs 
and accessories at discounted prices. 
Send $2 for information and postage to 
CB Operators of America, Attn: W. 
Thomas, 1 1 Collin Avenue, Uniontown 
PA 15401. BNB503 

WANTED: EQUIPMENT AND RELAT- 
ED ITEMS. The Radio Club of Junior 
High School 22 NYC, Inc.. is a nonprof- 
it organization, granted 501(c) £3} 
status by Ihe IRS. incorporated under 
the laws Of the stale of New York with 
the goal of using the theme of ham 
radio to further and enhance the edu- 
cation of young people. Your property 
donation would be greatly appreciated 
and acknowledged with a receipt for 
your lax deductible donation Please 
contact WB2JKJ through the Catlbook 
or telephone {5i6H>74-4072. 24 hours, 
seven days a week. Thank you! 
BNB506 

APPLE M - /c/e MORSE CODE 
PROGRAM. Menus. 31 modes, lesson 
plans, graphics, word processor. 
1-1 00 wpm. etc. Write LARESCQ, PO 
Box 2019, 1200 Ring Road, Calumet 
City IL 60409; (31 2)-89 1 -3279, 
BNB507 

HOMEBREW PROJECTS LIST. 
SASE WB2EUF. PO Box 708, East 
Hampton NY 1 1937. 0NB5O9 

SATELLITE SYSTEMS DISCOUNT 
CATALOG— $2 (refundable) Orion 
Descrambhng Manual — $19.95. 
LSASE— brochure. Microsomes. PO 
Box 2517-BB, Covma CA 91722 
BNB513 

LEARN MORSE CODE IN 1 HOUR, 
Amazing new easy technique Money- 
back guarantee $10 BAHR. Dept. 73, 
2549 Temple, Paimbay FL 32905 
BNB517 

ROTATING TOWER SYSTEMS, 

MC— Offers complete hardware sys- 
tems to rotate 45 and 55 tower. Write or 
call for further details and prices. Box 
44. Prosper TX 75078; (21 4)-347-2560 
BNB520 

SUPER FAST MORSE CODE 
SUPEREASY. Subliminal cassette 
Money-back guarantee. $10. Bahr, 
Dept 73, 2549 Temple. Palmbay FL 
32905 BNB522 

DX AWARDS. Need info on any DX 
awards, especially lesser known ones 



Check incoming cards for stickers or 
award notices Directory planned for 
mtd-1987. Ted Melmosky K2BV, 525 
Foster Street. South Windsor CT 
06074 BNB526 

TRS-80 4P/KANTRONICS UTU 

RTTY. Split-screen, 10 user keys, tile 
transfer. Runs in Mod 4 (80 char.) 
mode $30 to COMMPRO RTTY, c/o 
KB6IC 3711 Gayle Avenue, Omaha 
NE 68123. BNB527 

COMMODORE CUSTOM/PROPRI- 
ETARY CHIPS or complete repairs for 
Commodore 64 etc at tow prices. 24- 
hour turna rou n d 65 1 0— $9 .95 . 6526— 
$9 95. 6581 -$12 85. 6567— $14 50, 
82S100PLA— $12, 8701— $7.25, and 
many others. Ask us about quantity 
price. Just released from Australia, 
"The Commodore Diagnostician " A 
laminated chart and cross-reference 
guide for fixing your own computer. C- 
64 Power Supply at $29.95 Call toll 
free (600J-642-7634 (outside NY) or 
(914)-356-3l3i, Kasafa Microsystems, 
Inc., 33 Murray Hill Drive, Spring Valley 
NY 10977. BNB529 

DE FOREST AUDION UV nickel base, 
$1,500 plus shipping, certified funds. 
John Brolley r 1225 Los Pueblos, Los 
Alamos NM 87544. BN8530 

REAL-TIME HF WEFAX MAPS on a 
dot- matrix printer Available for Com- 
modore. IBM, Apple. Atari, and CoCo 
See March 86 OST Magazine for cir- 
cuit details Kit S28 15. Assembled 
$39 95. Software — Apple. Atari, and 
Commodore Si IBM— Si 5 plus $2,50 
shipping For info, send large SASE 
AAA Engineering, 2521 W. La Palma 
*K, Anaheim CA 92601: (714J-962- 
2114. BNB531 

OSLs. QSLs, RUSPRINT QSLs. 

Quant i lies of 100, 200, 300, or more 
Full color Old Glory and Liberty. Also 
Parchment, Golden Eagle, and others. 
SASE appreciated. Rte. 1 , Box 363-73, 
Spring Hill KS 66083 BNB532 

SINCLAIR ON PACKET? COMLINK I 
makes It easy Free info. A. Eckhardl. 
916 Anna Street, Boaisburg PA 1 6827, 
BNB533 

COLOR SSTV— For sale. Robot 400C 
slow-scan color transceiver and Robot 
600C multi-mode Keyboard Both mint 
condition, like new Asking $650 for 
both Call after 5 p m. lo (601J-B43- 
6405 or write to Don Dure* N5ICO, 700 
Farmer Street, Cleveland MS 36732. 
BNB539 

SHOW IT IN STYLE— Full color QSLs 
by Smrth Printing From your prints/ 
slides. Sample packet. SASE. 20420 
Cal haven Drive, Saugus CA 91350; 
<S05)-251~7211,BNB540 

YOUR TICKET OR UPGRADE via 

computer. Complete Novice course — 
theory, code, QSOs, more Complete 
code course — Novice, General. Extra, 
For IBM, Rad*o Shack. Commodore, 
Also great for examiners. SASE lor 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 6t 



details: JERLS, Incorporated, PO Box 
1 193S, Bedford VA 24523. BNB541 

ANTIQUE RADIOS, schematics, 
tubes, and literature. Send SASE to 
VfiSJSTV 376 Ciiley Road. Manchester 
NH 03103 ior large list. 8NBS42 

WANTEPr Yaesu Y0-9G1 band scope 
adapter. Pete Haas, PO Box 702. Kent 
OH 44240. BNB543 

KENWOOD 43QS OWNERS: Slop 
Scan automatically resumes the scan 
after the channel clears! No mods! No 
cut traces! Reviewed in OST 6/85 and 
73 2/85. $29.95 (kit 519.95). JabCO 
Electronics, R1 Box 386. Alexandria IN 
46O01. BNB544 

VOICEGATE NOISE REDUCTION. 
Studio technology eliminates back- 
ground QRN1 Features gated audio, 
dynamic expansion, 2 notch filters 1 
bandpass, cassette remote control, 
and more 1 SASE for free pamphlet or 
include S3. 50 for our demonstration 
cassette* $99.95, Jabco Electronics, 
R1 Sox 386, Alexandria IN 46001 
BN8S45 

ATARI FIELD DAY dup program for 



the 600, 800XL and 130 XE. Checks 
dupes and bad calls Deletes calls, lists 
calls, printouts for Epson printers, 
either alphabetically or suffix alphabet- 
ically Covers all bands, alt call areas. 
Double-sided disk $10. Vern Smith 
WA10EH. Box 20. E.Thompson Road. 
Thompson CT 06277. BNB546 

QSL CARDS, Choose from 6 beautiful 
new designs or custom printed Irom 
your art Write for free samples. San- 
dottar Press, PO Box 30726, Santa 
Barbara CA 93130. BNB547 

SAVE SI. 50 SHIPPING on 87-88 
ARRL Repealer Directory. Send $5 
total. All ARRL titles available for book 
price plus $1 shipping. Marshall Hill 
Enterprises, Inc., Marshall Hill, Brad- 
ford NH 03221, BNB548 

COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE. 
Predict range in miles based on xmtr, 
rcvf, and antenna parameters $15 
disk contains HF/VHF/UHF/L-BAND 
propagation programs plus Smith 
Chart impedance matching. Specify 
Commodore 64 or MS-DOS BASICA 
Lynn Geng WA9GFR, 6417 Morgan 
Road. Monroeville IN 46773. BNB549 



NEED FIVE-DAY CRASH COURSE to 
pass 1 3-wpm code test. Test must be 
given and passed at end of course 
Name fee. Prefer east of Mississippi, 
but will go anywhere Respond to Bob 
Herron T 3312 Jude Cr., Munysville PA 
15668. BNB550 

FOR SALE: Brand new Ten-Tec 2510 
satellite station, S400. Jim N1EJF. PO 
Box 1 101 , Hiilsboro NH 03244; (603). 
478-3262 BNB551 

WANTED; Azden PCS-3000 2* meter 
FM transceiver, any condition Adlai 
Breger, 8006 Dove Flight, San Antonio 
TX 7B250: (5l2)-523-543B. BNB552 

WANTED; Service manual for Yaesu 
FTX-660, WW pay for copying and 
postage. Jim Lisle WA4WQK, 3227 
Park Avenue, Columbus GA 31904. 
BNB553 

THE COMMUNICATION POST; Buy, 
sell trade— ham, shortwave, and other 
electronic gear Technical articles, 
projects Send large SASE for sample 
Copy 24 issues, $9.95 per year Box 
1771 Grand Forks NO 58206-1771, 
BNB554 



VHS VIDEO CASSETTES. $29-95 
total price for a box of 10 delivered 
anywhere in continental US Call for 
24-hour order info, KB6MT (714)*99G- 
9622 BNB555 

"COMMODORE C-128" specific ham 
programs. SATRAK128 tracks up to 8 
satellites simultaneously in reaMime, 
C128RTTY RTTY program for user 
port RTTY (example. MFJ-122B) 
devices. Send SASE for additional in- 
formation on above to: Raid Bnstor 
WA4UPD. 14303 177lh Avenue SE, 
Remon WA 98056. Phone (206}-235- 
0676. BNB556 

FACTORY FRESH NiCds. Save this 
ad AA/$1.45 each, AAA/$1,45 each, 
2N 270AA (replaces 2N 250AA used m 
ICOM 2AT/4AT BP3 packs) $1.85 
each, BP3 pack of 7 wired for your case 
$14.95 each, 2N 450A (used in (COM 
BP2/BPS, Tempo S4. Yaesu FT*2G7R/ 
208R) $2.40 each. Add S2 S&H/order. 
Cunard Associates. R D. 6. Box 104, 
Bedford PA 15522. BNB557 

HAM RADIO REPAIR, all makes, all 
models. Robert Hall Electronics, PO 
Box 6363, San Francisco CA 94128; 
(408^729-8200 BNB558 



QPECIAL EVENTS 



HOLIDAY-IN-DIXIE 

OSO PARTY 

APR 4 

The Holiday-in-Dixie QSO Party will 
operate on April 4 from 1800^2300 
UTC during the Hollday-in-Dixie Cele- 
bration, an annual 10-day event com- 
memorating the Louisiana Purchase, 
which is held in Shreveport and Bos- 
sier City, Louisiana Exchange: Name, 
QTH, and RSfT), Frequencies: SSB— 
7.235 and 14,245. CW— 7.115 and 
21 .1 15 (listen for CO HID). For an 8-1/2 
x 11 certificate, send an SASE and 
QSL to Holiday-m-Dixie QSO Parry, c/o 
WA5ARJ. PO Box 4842 T Shreveport 
LA 71 134. 

ROCHESTER MN 
APR 4 

The Rochester ARC will sponsor the 
10th annual Rochester Area Hamfest 
on April 4, beginning at 830 a.m., at 
John Adams Junior High School. 1525 
NW 31st Street, Rochester, Minneso- 
ta, Talk-in on 146,22/,S2. For further 
information, write to RARC, c/o 
WB0YEE, 2253 Nordic Center NW, 
Rochester MN 55901. 

COLUMBUS IN 
APR 4 

The Columbus ARC will hold its 
Swapfest '87 on April 4, from 8 am, to 
5 p.m.. at the 4-H Fairgrounds, in 
Columbus. Indiana. Admission is $3. 
8-foot table, $4; 6-foot table, S3 Talk-in 
on 146.790 and 444.950. FCC testing 



held at Knights Inn Motel, Send Form 
610 and copy of license ten days in 
advance to Til Kinser KI9R; 6651 N. 
Road 110 W,, Columbus IN 47203; 
(812)-372-5006. For tables or informa- 
tion, contact Dave Mann KA9UUP, 458 
l\L Country Club Road 1 Columbus IN 
47201; (8l2)-342-6302> 

ARCADE TRADE FAIR 
APR 4^5 

The Pioneer Radio Operators Soci- 
ety {PROS) will operate KC2JY on April 
4-5, from 1400-2200 UTC, for the 4th 
annual Arcade Trade Fair. Operation 
will be on SSB with suggested frequen- 
cies 3 890, 7240, and 14 250. For a 
QSL. send a QSL and an SASE to 
PROS— KC2JY, Box 296, Arcade NY 
14009 

WILLI NGBORO NJ 
APRS 

The Willi ngboro Repeater Group will 
hold its annual hamfest on April 5, 
from 8 a.m. io 2 p.m., at Holiday Lakes, 
Rte. 130 and Creek Road, Willingboro, 
New Jersey, Admission is $3 at the 
door or $2.50 in advance 8 XYLs and 
children under 16 free, Table space; 
$5 per S-foot table. Taitgaters must 
purchase an admission ticket, out* 
door selling only. Talk-in on 146.925 
or 146,52. For further information, 
write to Willingboro Area Repeater 
Group. PO Box 472, Willingboro NJ 
08046, or call Jack K2KLM at {609}- 
677-5249 after 6 p.m. 



GROSSE POINTE WOODS Ml 
APRS 

The South Eastern Michigan ARA 
will hold its 29th annual Hamfest 
Swap and Shop on April 5, from 8 am, 
until 3 p.m., at the Grosse Pointe North 
High School, 707 Vernier Road. 
Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan, Ad- 
vance tickets $1 9 $3 at the door. Ad- 
vance tables $8, $10 at the door Talk- 
in on 147, 70/. 10 and 146.52. For more 
information, write to SEMARA Ham- 
fest, PO Box 646, St. Cfair Shores Ml 
48080, or phone Fred Lewis NK8M at 
(313J-881-0187. 

FRAMINGHAM MA 
APRS 

The Framingham ARA witl hold its 
annual spring flea market and exams 
on April 5. beginning at 10 am. at the 
Framingham Civic League Bldg 214 
Concord Street {Rte. 126), in down- 
town Framingham, Massachusetts. 
Admission is S2 and tables are $10 (in- 
cludes one free admission). Pre-regis- 
t ration is required for tables and ex- 
ams. Talk-in on .75/. 15. To reserve 
tables, contact Jon Werner Kl VVC. 52 
Overlook Drive. Framingham MA 
01701; (617HB77-7166. To register for 
license exams, send completed Form 
610, copy of ham license, and Check 
for $4.25 payable to ARRL/VEC to 
FARA, PO Box 3005, Framingham MA 
01701. Walk-in exams given on a 
space-available basis. 

MADISON Wl 
APR 5 

The Madison Area Repeater Associ- 
ation, Inc. will hold its 15th annual 
Madison Swapfest on April 5, begin* 
ntng at 8 am,, at the Dane County Ex* 
position Center Forum Building in 



Madison. Wisconsin Admission is 
S2 50 in advance and S3 at the door. 
Children 12 and under are admitted 
free. Tables are S5 each in advance 
and $6 at the door, plus admission. 
Reserve by March 31 Talk-in on 
146.16/76 For admission tickets, 
table reservations, or information on 
commercial exhibit space, contact 
MARA. PO Box 3403, Madison Wl 
53704; {6Q8)-274-5 153, 

CHARLESTON WV 

APRS 

The Charleston WV Area Hamfest & 
Computer Show will be held on April 5, 
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.. at the Civic Cen* 
ter in Charleston, West Virginia (follow 
1-64, 1-77, and 1-79 to exits marked "To 
Civic Center'*). Admission is S4. Talk- 
in on 6.28/6.88. For more information, 
contact Ollie Rmehart KA8TW, 1256 
Ridge Drive, South Charleston WV 
25303; (304^-768-9534 (days) or {304}- 
768-9534 (nights). 

LANCASTER PA 
APR 5 

The 14th Lancaster Hamfest. spon- 
sored by Sercom. Inc., will be held on 
April 5, from 8 am lo 2 pm, at the 
Overtook Roller Rink (on Rte. 501 just 
one mile north of the Rte 30/501 inter- 
section, two miles north of Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania), $4 admission, XYLs 
free. $5 per space for tailgating. Tables 
$10, perimeter or with electricity $12. 
Talk-in on 146.01/.61 or 147.015/615 
SASE to Hamfest Committee, PO Box 
6082. Lancaster PA 17603 for info. 

CLARKSVILLE TN 
APRS 

The Clarksville Amateur Transmit- 
ting Society will sponsor its annual 



62 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 




Hi Pro Repeaters 



MASGIORE ELECTRONIC LAB. 



Ma nufacturers of Quality Communications Equipment 



•Repeaters 
•Links 

•Remote Base 
•VHF,UHF 

•Receivers 

•Transmitters 

•Antennas 




Hi Pro E 

EXPANDABLE REPEATER SYSTEM 



•Standard and 
Computerized 
Controllers 

•Standard and 

Computerized 
Auto Patches 
•Duplexers 



• A NEW CONCEPT IN REPEATEH DESIGN. THE H! Pro "£" IS AN EXMNCABLE REPEATER WJTH THE FOLLOWING FEATURES A BASIC REPEATER WHICH WOULD IN- 

CLUDE A COMPLETE RECEIVER. TRANSMITTER, COR. FRONT PANEL CONTROLS AND INDICATORS. LOCAL SPEAKER AND MIC JACK AND CAPABLE OF FUTURE 

EXPANSION ALL HOUSED IN AN EXTREMELY RUGGED, ENCLOSED. 19-INCH RACK MOUNTABLE CABINET 

• THIS SYSTEM CAN BE EXPANDS} XT TIME OF PURCHASE OR CAN BE AN AFTER-PURCHASE ADO ON THE ADD ONS ARE -HIGHER POWER 11W220 VAC POWER 

SUPPLY. IDENTIFIER AUTO PATCH. OR COMPUTER CONTROLLERS IN ADDmON TO THESE ADO ONS AN ADDITIONAL RECEIVER AND TRANSMITTER CAN BE 

MOUNTED INTERNALLY FOR USE AS CONTROL LINKS. REMOTE BASE OR DUAL BAND OPERATION. ETC 
AN EXTENSION ASNEL IS AVAILABLE FOR LOCAL MONITORING OF THE REPEATER AND CONTAINS ALL NECESSARY METERING. STATUS LIGHTS AND INDICATORS ALL 
ADD ONS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE COMPANY AND ARE COMPLETE INCLUDING INSTRUCTIONS 




VHF-UHF REPEATERS 



SUPERIOR RECEIVER AND TRANSMITTER SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR REPEATER SERVICE, 

ADJUSTABLE TRANSMITTER POWER, FROM 1 TO 25 WATTS MINIMUM OUTPUT WITH EXTREMELY COOL OPERATION.— 
AUTOMATIC BATTERY BACK UP SYSTEM CAPABILITY WITH BATTERY CHARGING AND REVERSE POLARITY PROTECTION.— 
NOWWITH A FULLCOMPLIMENTOF INDICATORS AND STATUS LIGHTS,— 100% DUTY CYCLE— ADVANCED REPEATER SQUELCH 
NO CHOPPING, POPPING, OR ANNOYING REPEATER KEY UPS DURING LIGHTNING STORMS.— DIE CAST ALUMINUM R.F. 
ENCLOSURES— SMALL SIZE SV* x 19 x 13 "—HIGH QUALITY LONG LIFE DESIGN. 

AMATEUR DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE 









*i 



« * ■ 









■ « • * 



*_JL 



* * 




Hi Pro 



ASSEMBLED 
SMALL SIZE 

3UI^ 




^Qy^il 



TRANSMITTER AND RECEIVER used in all hi pro repeaters 




ASK ABOUT OUR COMPUTER CONTROL 
SYSTEM, AND MICROCONTROL AUTO 
PATCH, AND REPEATER KITS. 



HI PRO TRANSMITTER 

DESIGNED FOH REPEATER 

SERVICE WrTH EXCELLENT 

AUDfO, STABILfTY, 

HARMONIC REJECTION 

AMD LOW NOISE 



ADJUSTABLE 

POWER 

OUTPUT 

UP TO 5 WATTS 

FROM THE 

EXCITER BOARD 

COOL OPERATOR 



HI PRO RECEIVER 
THPSRECEJVEfliSTBE 

HEAftFOf iNEREPEATEP. 
AND BOASTS SUPERIOR 
SOUElCH ACTION NEEDED 
FOR THIS TYPE OF 
SERVJCE EXCELLENT 
SENS I T I VJTY. STABILITY 
AND SELECTIVITY 

USETHrSREClEYER 
TO REPLACE THAT 

TROUBLESOME RECEIVER 
IN YOUR PRESENT 
REPEATER 





• I. 



ASSEMBLE!} 
SMALL SIZE 

3h*B'V 



ft; 



*»4? 



Maggiore Electronic Laboratory 

600 WESTTOWN RD. TELEX: 499-0741-MELCO 
WESTCHESTER, PA 19382 PHONE 215-436-6051 



WRITE OR CALL FOR OUR COMPLETE CATALOG 



'When You Buy. Say 73 



rr 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 63 



"kit 



EVER YTHMG IN HF WIRE ANTENNAS: FROM DIPQLES TO SUFERLQQPS 

SEE WHAT WE'RE DOING WITH 
ANTENNAS & BALUNS 

Computer optomized NEW G5RV, Super Zepp, 
Incomparable C1-2K, CI 4K ( B4-2K BALUNS. 
Coming soon the MONSTER BALUN, 



56 J 



v 



50 OHM FEED 



^ 



^ 



% 



<b. 



r o 



SUPERLOOP 

80 & 40 M two band 
loop SWR <2:1 
from 3,5 to 3.8 
& 7.0 to 7.3 MHz. 
All bands with 
transmatch, 
Now and 
only 
SG9.95 



& & 



56' 



30' 



& 



& 



tfP 



^ 



,c 



^ 



**> 



tttf 



^150 



^ fik^ -<V *N0VICES* 

W^^ ^#*i>^ Discover 28 & 220 Voice 

w^«t^ THE FUN STARTS NOW 

Everything you need for a 
BIG signal on the NEW bands: It's all here. 



SEND SASE FOR NEW CA TALOG FROM MM W4 THU 

(804) 4 84-0 140 BOX 6159 FOR TSMQUTH, VA 23 703 

t MONEY ORDER, VISA, MASTER CHARGE OR UPS, COD. PLEASE ALLOW FOR POSTAGE. 



* * * * * ft ft i 1 A * i. A 

xxxirirxxxiririririr 



Subscribe Today To The 
World's Leading Magazine For 
Shortwave & Scanner Listeners! 




International Broadcasting 
Utility Monitoring 
Scanners 

Shortwave and Longwave 
Satellites 

Electronic Projects 
Listening Tips 
Frequency Lists 
Equipment Reviews 
News-breaking Articles 
Feature Articles 
Exclusive Interviews 
Insights by the Experts 
New Products 



Each month MONITORING TIMES, the first wide- 
spectrum listener's publication and still the best, brings 
you 64 giant tabloid pages of late-breaking information 
on every aspect of monitoring the radio spectrum. 

Fast-paced and information-packed; MONITOR IN G 
TIMES consistently scoops the publishing industry. 

ORDER YOUR SUBSCRIPTION TODAY before 
another issue goes by; only $15 per year (U.S. and 
Canada), $22 per year (foreign) or send $1 for a sample 
issue (foreign send 2 IRCs). 

MONITORING TIMES 

P.O. Box 98 



Brasstown, N.C. 28902 




Ask About Dayton Specials 

OUTSTANDING PRICES 

ON IBM XT™ * 
COMPATIBLE SYSTEMS! 

SYSTEMS $399.00 

MOTHERBOARD WITH BIOS AND 
FIRST 64 K OF RAM, UPGRADABLE 
TO A FULL 640K OF RAM. FLIP TOP 
CASE. K&XT (AT LOOK ALIKE) KEY- 
BOARD 150 WATT POWER SUP- 
PLY WITH ALL THE POWER NEED* 
ED TO RUN EXTRA DRIVES AND 
CARDS. 

SYSTEM #3 $999.00 

MOTHERBOARD WITH BIOS AND 
FIRST 256K OF RAM. UPGRAD- 
ABLE TO A FULL 640K OF RAM. 
FLIP TOP CASE. KBXT (AT LOOK 
ALIKE) KEYBOARD. 150 WATT 
POWER SUPPLY. COLOR GRAPH- 
ICS CARD WITH RGB AND COM- 
POSITE OUTPUTS, MULTI I/O 
CARD WiTH TWO DISK DRIVE 
PORTS, ONE PARALLEL PORT, 
ONE SERIAL PORT AND ONE SE- 
RIAL PORT OPTION, ONE GAME 
PORT, CLOCK AND CALENDAR 
WITH BATTERY BACKUP. TWO 
FLOPPY DISK DRIVES DS DD 3&0K 



i") * IBM IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF 
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COR P. 

UPGRADING MOTHERBOARD TO A FULL S40KRAM 

UPGRADE FROM 64K TO A FULL 54DK , . $102,00 

UPGRADE FfiOWI2S6K TO A FULL 64«< $ 7D0Q 

SYSTEM til $699.00 

MOTHERBOARD WITH BIOS AND 
FIRST 256K OF RAM. UPGRADABLE 
TO A FULL 640K OF RAM. FLIP TOP 
CASE. KBXT (AT LOOK ALIKE) KEY- 
BOARD. 150 WATT POWER SUP^ 
PLY DUAL DISK DRIVE CARD WITH 
CABLES. ONE FLOPPY DRIVE DS 
DD 360K. A COLOR GRAPHICS 
CARD WITH RGB AND COMPOSITE 
OUTPUT. 
(ALL YOU NEED tS A MONITOR) AND A COMPOSITE MONITOR 

SHIPPING INFOfittATIQN; PLEASE INCLUDE 10% OF ORDER FOR 

SHIPPING AND HANDLING CHARGES (JWNWUM $2.50, MAXIMUM $10) 

CANADCAN ORDERS, ADD $7.50 IN US FUNDS. MICHIGAN RESJDENTS -^ \ f K 

ADD 4% SALES TAX. FOR FREE FLYER, SEND 22* STAMP OR SASE 

hal-Troimix, inc. 

P.O. BOX 1101 DEPT. N hours 

1 2671 DIX-TOLEDO HWY ^ »^™ estm^-s* harqLd ^ Qwland 

SOUTHGATE^MICH, 48195 PHONE (313) 2BT-7773 WBZXH 





*-175 



MULTIFAX 



A COMPUTER PROGRAM THAT WILL COPY: 

• WEFAX FROM GOES SATELLITES 

* HF FAX FROM NAVY WEATHER BROADCASTS 

* APT FROM NOAA POLAR ORBITING SATELLITES 

• WEFAX REBROADCAST FROM TV TRANSPONDERS 
IN UP TO FOUR COLORS ON YOUR COMPUTER COLOR 
MONITOR. 

MULTIFAX displays the full psciure on the monitor as it is be- 
ing recorded. Meanwhile, memory is filled with fine-grain 
data so that any quarter or sixteenth of the picture may be 
viewed in greater detail. All data or any view may be saved 
on disk. 

MULTIFAX is adaptable to a variety of facsimile transmis- 
sions and computer clock rates since sweep speeds are key- 
board adjustable. 

Picture synchronization is automatic when frame sync is 
transmitted (WEFAX OR HF FAX), otherwise keyboard syn- 
chronization is available (NOAA APT). 
MULTIFAX will run on the ISM 8M PC and IBM 1 " PC compati- 
ble computers having at least 320K of memory for Multifax. 
Hard copies are obtained by using your Print Screen 
program . 

Cata entry to the computer is via its game port. 
Price is $49.00 (US) for MULTIFAX on disk with instructions 
and interface circuit information. 

MULTIFAX was written by an author of 'WEFAX Pictures on 
Your IBM PC" published in the June 1985 issue of "OST' 1 

Elmer W. Schwittek, K2LAF 

429 N. Country Club Drive, Atlantis, FL 33462 

305-439-1370 



*BM ro<)isk?rn| h i ■ I ■ - i - :»rk % ! ' i| H M Corn 

Multifax is a registered iradernark of E. W Schwrttek 



198 



64 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



r 



7 




^ California Packet Conce pts 



Tour COMPLETE Packet Souret 
Packtf Radio at teiy at 1-2-3 



TNC1I 



, — ™| 



* Ldcantd QiM Of ** 

TAPR TNC 2 



■l 
audi 

' 3; w4 IN 



hi* 






IBM'- PC/XT COMPATIBLE CPC-XT 




FCC Port 1 5 

Hun & 

Canified 

(•) 



or NO entro chnrfli 



Uinanur»Vf"BPi 
IBJZtni* 



flAHDAID 



« &J0 ■ 0*i Hstfctr 



J f7 HH, 



AW 



UFGtADCS 



+M' 



im. 



omoHS 



'CtA 






* OH* OPtlCMl *->i5W* 
UtfAMHD live 



* HI EHhl^VJBf 

BBS) 



*T* Wop I4* 1 
1304 kwl «!»*»** 



RADIO HITS VHF/UHF/HF 

• Tilt COMMANDER 2 mtttr Kit 154" 




- 144 !0 HA MHt irt Id WH^ 1-H0» 1 ll 
KtfZurfseN 

10 WcrttnonHrt* I J *wtt rn^npum 
OUlfftJ* 



• Dit EXPLORER 70 cm Kit 

ji0ic.jjo*ih: mil »hz Stppi i^Ot^im p 

fi won nominO' 16 *hH moiirraiin D*ifpU^ 

V V, I WfAltl*4, 

• Tlii DSE HF Tnnictfrir Kit 



usi iii. cw 
Mvettf PI P 

►■ jn ;d IS 10 



164 



t* 



2a4 » 



+ 14" M. 

19" 



Pewtr S*ppJy lit for Ratios 

World Rsnouned Kit* from 
DICK SMITH ELECTRONICS 



TIm COMPUTE 12-3 Package 1299' 



I M 



mJuda !NC It iid CPC-XT S Cui m wd * 

[. ornptere *irn power supplies and cobles 

i AH assembled and rested m a system for 48 hrs. t 

* I yeor R! PLACEMENT Godr<nt« on ALL AjwmbJed 

Product* (Aik us about fhe derate) 

* NO handling or Credit Cord Fees! 
4 Shipping rid UPS FREE oo TNC IE 

' t.alifomrD addresses must add 6*** sofes Ton 

* We welcome CUSTOM Quotes dealers iwP 

Order Toll Fret Outtide CA. Oueitioni A Information 

1 800-233-0301 ,<*. n , w ii 1 -209-625 8429 

tcln 650 30B7VIB \<t°w W«it*rn Union InUrfact) 
P O lei 44ef. Viialio, CA 937 7 8 






tt' hiipuj'cnoi 



UnMnHtffV 



1 Wfttfft Vou 0uy r Say 73 



*» 



The XP-706-US 

Multiband 

Antenna 



/ 



analysis quality is 
less expensive 



The unique design of the XP-706-US antenna system gives you A/IONOBAND 
PERFORMANCE in a Multiband beam. The antenna USES NO TRAPS or 
loading coils that rob power and limit bandwidth. Sommer Antennas use the 
FULL surface area - i ihe elements on ALL bands. 

Our commitment to use only the finest materials insures that your investment 
will last for years. Our system uses a Double rectangular boom, CAST alu- 
minum element mounting brackets, all stainless hardware and a high power 
baiun. 

Mottoband performance on a Multiband beam is yours when you move up to 
Sommer, the last beam you'll have to buy. We believe Sommer is your best 

antenna value when compared to the construction and performance of other 
multi and monoband antenna systems. 



* 






4* 

Hi 



j— fl-i 



Tip 



XP706 



Gain and F/B ratio are 
given as compared to a 

3 element monoband 
antenna of comparable 
boom length and op 
limitation. Gain ol the 
monoba nder Is as- 
sumed to be 6 dBd and 
F/B as 25 dB 



~r~r 

i ■ a. m 



■ ^ 




*■■ 








i 




SWH 




^ * * 


t r 


t r | 

■■** 




ftb ratio 


_ ^ -- 





XP 706 BEAM 



HJ. IrtiftlMr Corp* 
P.O. Box 5369 



(803) S76-5M6 



^271 



DMIMER 



73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 65 



Swap test at the National Guard Ar- 
mory an Hwy 41 A (Ft Campbelf Btvd) 
in Clarksville, Tennessee, on April 5, 
The armory is off l-24 T three miles 
south of Gate T to Fort Campbetl Ad- 
mission is tree. Tables are $5 each 
Talk-in on 146,52, 146.S05/.205, or 
packet 145,03. To reserve tables or to 
get more information, call Larry 
W04D8J at (615>-23S-6141- 

OMAHA NE 

APRS 

The Ak-Sar-Sen ARC will present its 
annual auction on April 5 at The Radial 
Soaal Hall, 1516 N.W. Radial High- 
way, Omaha. Nebraska, Check-in 
starts at S a.m., auction at 9:15. No 
admission tee. Talk-in on 146.34A94, 
For rules or more into, write Ak-Sar* 
Ben ARC, PO Box 291, Omaha NE 
6B1 01 , Attn: Auction Chairman. 

MOORELANDOK 
APRS 

The Great Plains ARC 6th annual 
Northwest Oklahoma Eyeball and 
Swapmeet will be held in Moo re land on 
April 5, starting at 9 am 52 admission 
ai the door. Dealer and swap tables 
available at no charge. Talk-in on 
147 72/12, 146,13/73, and 146.52 
VE tests given on April 4. Directions: 
North on Mam or Elm Street, across the 
tracks and west For further informa- 
tion, call (405}-994^560O or write to 
Gerald Bowman WG5Z. Box 356. 
Mooreland OK 73S52. 



©ee©ec)©e>©©€)©e 



© 
© 
© 

© 
© 
© 
© 



IM TO OPERATE BY1PK BBJING OHM? 
HAMS TRAVEUJNG WITH US DO! 

Escorted and hosted by Radio Peking. 
Mosf comprehensive 22 day tour. 



For brochure tend S.A.S,E- & phone number 

Paul Holt. 1619 /V. Royvr St, 
Colorado Springs, CO 80907 



APPALACHIAN TRAIL 
APR 10-12 

The Lanierland ARC will operate 

W4IKW from 1400 UTC on April 10 un- 
til 0200 UTC on April 1 1 , and also from 
1400 UTC on April 11 until 0200 UTC 
on April 12 at Amicaiola Falls State 
Park to honor the 50th anniversary of 
the completing of the Appal acian Trad, 
a 2,000-mile hiking trail from Springer 
Ml in Georgia to ML Katahdm in 
Maine The suggested operating fre- 
quencies xQRM are 14.270, 7,270, 
and 3 870 on the General phone 
bands, and 7.140 and 3.740 on the 
Novice bands. Listen for CQATC on all 
bands. For a commemorative certifi- 
cate, send QSL and a 9 x 12 SASE to 
Lanierland ARC, PO Box 2182, 
Gainesville GA 30503. 

ST. CHARLES MO 
APR 11 

The St. Charles ARC will operate 
WBGHSI f rem 1 400-2200 UTC on April 
1 1 to celebrate its fifteenth anniversary 
near its original meeting place. Thus 
special -event station will transmit on 
7 250. 14.325, 21.350, 28.510. and 
146.6? as propagation and QRM per- 
mit. For a certificate, send a large 
SASE to the St Charles ARC. PO Box 
1429, St Charles MO 63302-1 42$. 

SUBMARINE SERVICE 

ANNIVERSARY 

APR 11-12 

The Olympsa RAC will celebrate the 
anniversary of the United 
Stales Submarine Ser- 
vice by operating station 
WA3BATfromtheUS.S 
Becuna, a World War II 
submarine and the 
U.S.S. Qlympia, flagship 
of Admiral Dewey in 
1898, Transmissions can 
be heard beginning at 
1 300 UTC on April 11 un* 
til 2000 UTC on April 12. 



© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 



CW frequencies will be 3.590 h 7.050, 
1 4.050 t 21 .090, and 28. 150. Phone fre- 
quencies will be 3,890. 7.240, 21 360. 
and 28.600 (all frequencies within 10 
kHz) Two-meter operation is planned 
as well as Novice bands. For a certifi- 
cate and additional information, send a 
business-Sfzed SASE (US) or one IRC 
(foreign) to Olympra Radio Amateur 
Club, PO Box 928, Philadelphia PA 
19105, 

PA MAPLE FESTIVAL 40TH 
APR 11-12 

The Somerset County, Pennsylva* 
nia, ARC will operate KA31US on the 
tower 25 kHz of the General section of 
75 and 40 meters on April 1 ! and 12 to 
commemorate the 40th anniversary of 
the Pennsylvania Maple Festival. On 
April 11 from 1700-2200 UTC on 40 
meters, then from 2200 to ? on 75 me- 
ters. On April 12, from 1 700-2200 UTC 
on 40 meters. Please send an SASE for 
a certificate to KA3IUS, FLD. fl* Bo* 
394-B f Meyersdale PA 15552. 

SRAINTREE MA 
APR 12 

The Soutb Shore ARC will hold its 
annual indoor flea market on April 12. 
from 11 am to 4 p.m., at the Viking 
Club. 410 Quincy Avenue. Bramtree. 
Massachusetts Admission is Si 8- 
foot tables available for S10 each (in- 
cludes one free admission per table) in 
advance. Send payment (made ou! to 
South Shore Amateur Radio Club) to 
Ed Doherty W1 MPT , 236 Wildwood Av- 
enue. Braintree MA 02184 before April 
9 Tables will cost S1 2 on the day of the 
sale. If you have questions, call Ed at 
(6T7)-643-443l during the evenings, 

AUSTIN TX 
APR IS 

The Austin ARC will sponsor Its 
Spring Swapfest on April 1 8 1 beginning 
at 7 a.m. at the Manchaca fire station 



on FM1626, south of Auslin. Texas, 
Free admission. Tables. $2 Talk-in on 
146.18/.7B, for info, contact Dave 
Harper WD5N. 109 West 38 Street, 
Austin TX 78705; (512^454-9205 
(evenings). 

ARBOR DAY 
APR 20-26 

Special-event stations will be operat- 
ing from 2400 UTC Apnl 20 to 0600 
UTC April 26 from Nebraska Cily. Ne- 
braska, the home of Mr. J Sterling 
Morton, the founder oi Arbor Day. Sta- 
tions will be operating in the General 
portion of the phone and CW bands on 
80 through 10 meters. SWLs can par- 
ticipate also. Please send a business- 
size SASE and your QSL to Nebraska 
City ARC, PO Box 278. Nebraska City 
NE 68410. 

DAYTON OH 

APR 24-26 

The Dayton ARA will sponsor the 
Dayton Bamvention on April 24-26. 
Tickets for all three days will be sold in 
advance only; no spaces sold at the 
gale. For further information, contact 
DARA, Box 44. Dayton OH 45401 . call 
(513H33-7720 for general informa- 
tion, (5l3)-223-0923 for flea market tn- 
formatron, and (5l3)-223-26l 2 for lodg- 
ing information (no reservations by 
phone). See display ad on page 1 1 for 
further detail 5. 

RTCHBURG MA 
APR 25 

The Montachussel ARA will hold a 
flea market at the Knights of Columbus 
Halt on Electric Avenue in Frtchburg, 
Massachusetts, on April 25 from 9:30 
a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is $1, tables 
are $8, Talk-in on i44.B5r 145,45 and 
r 52. For reservations, send check 
payable to MARA, do James Beaure* 
gard f 7 Mountain Avenue, Fitchburg 
MA 01420. 



©©©©©e>e>©e>e>e©e> 




L* 41 ui-i. . 






exaa 



^Radjp 



3 uG 




MOBILE 
HF ANTENNA 



naoxui 



CAP tr*$L«sc-.« fra 10 in H 






BAJfDSWITCgDiG - Svtfcc&ori inmtmailj to 
jnt^Zua** Irmttpvzacimm on ic; atari ' 

meg-^a H£5CKAro« - m&-$ v »au«wr 

{jtf mi Vrvnamm Bitnaffl a *JIiciH3£j an ill burial 
riXNCTSOTiAL DESIGH - Provide Lo* *ind, 

* a i T^ie n i a i *P P * lL f i * c * '• Rn?g«i cggi inaction tot loaf 

M.it*-1 lif ■ *ad ruliihilny" .V«w ruld-crtf f«tur« I 

■■id llllt 

iOO WATT CAPACITY - Can*«n-*uv. r*Uflj| 
CGUFLTTT A^TETtHA • RUJJT TO WQCWt 

PRICE $74.95 

[QW WATT MODEL AVAILABLE ■ 154,11 
iJUapiaf yr*p*ni *vm oicck it mmijr orflara. 
SiUp r jj( *4dod to credii eajrd iai4i ind a«I*rs' 
jut at i&* luwir +3 5tz:ei. 

TEXAS RADIO PRODUCTS 




3*i 1 141 




■277 i aiTi 77i -um 



— 



Spider Antenna u 

US rv*»**h 43*5»::, malt*. TtJ 



ENJOY K.F. OPERATION TO ITS FULLEST 
WITH A SPIDER ' 4-BAND ANTENNA 

Be prepared for expected increases in sunspot 
activity by using the Spider" 4- Band Mobile 
Antenna Our patented design will enable you to 
monitor up to four H F. Bands without having to 
stop, change resonators ot retune Just band 
swftch your rig for enjoyable mobile operation 
on 10-1 5-20-40- or 75 meiers We afso have a 
Spider '" 4-Band Maritime Antenna Write or call 
for our free, detailed brochure and price list. 
Ask The Ham Who H,is Tuned Oner 



MULTI-BAND ANTENNAS 

Till OWENSMOUTH AVE.. SUITE 4S3C 

CAHOCfl PAttK, CA 91301 
laiBI 141-S460 FRED KSAQI 



UNAD1LLA 




CONTACT YOUR DEALER 

FOR MORE INFORMATION 

Amateur Radio Baluns- 
T raps-Remote Coaxial Switches 

Or Write To: 

UNADILLA DIV. of ANTENNA'S ETC. 

P.O. Box 215 BV ANOOVER, MA. 01810 

617-475-7831 -*' 38 



66 73 Amateur Radio • April, t987 



New rigs and old favorites, plus the best essential accessories for the amateur. 




3621 FANNIN ST 
HOUSTON. TX 77004-3913 

CALL FOR ORDERS 
1-713-520-7300 OR 
1-713-520-0550 

ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED OR SALES PRICE 
REFUNDED 




EQUIPMENT 

Kenwood TH2Q5AT 

Kenwood TS 440 

Irom R7000 25-2000 MHz. ... 

lcom!C735 

Ten-Tec 2510 (Easy OSCAR) 
KDKFM240NT 



Trade in your old HT 
...Call for trade 
.949.00 
....849.00 

439.00 

279.00 







■■ 



- ■ - * 



Mirage Amps.. 15^ OFF 

Tokyo Hy-Power HL1 K AMP No. 4CX250B 699.00 




Lunar 2M4-40P. 



>■ ■_■■ T ^■■Itll ■ 



109.00 



ACCESSORIES 

B&WVIEWSTAR ANTENNA TUNER.... , 39.95 

Heil HC3/HC4/HC5 Stock 

HeilBM 10 Boom Mike headset.,., CALL 

Tri-H 5000A Remote Phone $189.00 

Triplett 3360 VOM (same as FLUKE 77) 69.00 

DaiwaNS660A 30/300/3000 watts .....135.00 

A1incoELH230D- Excellent buy 68.00 

Nye MBS- A (for the big boys I) ..529.00 

■_ J I I L J I \gr ^T^T^T !— r it i| . . ^ _ , - . . f m a . . . -.-----j- ■ i ■ ■ ■ m ■ ■ ■■ ■■ ■ r ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■■■■ ■ ■ ■ r ■ r m mF ' ■ V ^w* 

Ameco PT-2 84.95 

New Tokyo HC200A .115.00 

Nel-Tech Labs Digital Voice Keyer DVK 100 335.00 

Astatic SilverEagle& Base ,66,00 



BELDEN 

9913 low loss, solid center, foil/braid shield.... 
8214 RG8 Foam : . 

8237 RG8 ,,...,, 

3267 RG213 

8000 1 4 G a stranded copper ant. wire 

B448 8 conductor rotor cable 

9405 Heavy duty £-16 Ga 6r18 Ga.. 

u!7(_ JO nUun . _ _ _ . _. . .k_ . j ■ !■»■■■■> ■.ji. 1 .--.jii 

9269RG-62A/U 

8403 Mic Cable, 3 condctr & shield. 

1 00 -feet 82 1 4 w/ends installed 

8669 7/16" tinned copper braid ,.,.. 



: 



....51c/ft. 

■ >■ i' l TiJvr I Li 

....39cffl. 

....55cm. 
...,13c/fl 
....33c/U. 
...56c/ft. 
....20c/ft. 

...16cm. 

...45c/ft. 
....54.00 

..i,oom. 



AMPHENOL 

a3lSP-PL259Silverp!ate . 1.25 

UG176 reducer RG8X ....30 

831J Double Female UHF 2.00 

L.Jj_ l^r I E " I VI ^Tl u . . .-■E.LLBEBijj ■ r ■ ■ ■ a i ■ ■ ■ ■ r a i ■ p p a *■ ■ ■ ■ - ■ ■ ■ ■ »■-- ■ ■ ■ - - ■ ■ - j ■ »fcJ« \J\J 

82-97 N Female Bulkhead.., - 3.00 

82 63 Inline Female N _ 4.00 

82-98 N eibow ..9.00 

31*212 BNC-RG59 1 50 

31-216 UG201 A/U N Male-BMC Female 2.00 

31-2BNC-RG58 1.50 

34025 N Male. RGS8 3.00 

34125 H Female UHF male 9.00 

3128BNCFemale-PL259 , ..3,00 

4400 N Male-50 239 7.00 



PACKET POWER 

AEAPK-232 299.00 

KantronicsKPC2400 299.00 

Kantronics2400 139.00 

Kantronics Packet II 149.00 

MFJ 1270... ...125.00 

AEAPM-1 149.00 

New AEA UDC-232 Firmware, No modem, 

List 279.00 , 249.00 

New Kantronics KAM , ...,299.00 



raicowi 



- . ■ . . .. .. . . . 

'. ■:: v. '. 




IC26A List 429 



YourCosi369.00 



ANTENNAS 

Esopcle 144 MHz.. ..... 44.95 

AOP-1, Complete Oscar Antenna.. , 149.95 

Butternut HF6V n 80-10 vertical. , 125.00 

HF2V, 80 & 40 vertical 119.00 

\ i □ - ■ BiiiiBBiii l BBt l rBBBii l iiBBBiir a BB-iiriBBB a -i aa -irrp---i-irrr-->-i I O t3 - LjU 

Hustler G7- 144 11995 

Hustler GBTV 139.00 

K L M H F World Class Series Antennas Cal I Don 

Alpha Delta Twin Sloper 49.00 

Coax Seal 2.00/roll 

B&WOipoles..: Less 10% 

KLMKT-34A.... 399.00 

W2AU, W2DU „..,....,... ...Now Available 

NEW KLM 1 ,2^44LBX „.', 129.00 

1296 Power Divider Soon 

Orion CD-78 + BS 80 75/80 rotatable dipde 299.00 



OTHER ANTENNAS 

Diamond D-130 Discone 25-1300 MHz 

Larsen Kulduck, 

Larsen 2M y?wave telescope ant 

AvanH AP1 51 ,3G on Glass Antenna 

AntecoSM, 5/8, Mag. Mount. Comp ... 

Orion 2 M 1 12 wave Handy Antenna 

Van Gordon SLA-1 1 60^80-40 Sloper .., 

Valor A8-5 Mobile 

Stoner DAI 00 D Active Rx Antenna 
DC Tenna Hitch 3/8-24 Thread 
Fits 3/4" tracer hitches 



u mm u m i 1 i ■ ■ ■ ■ 



..79.00 
.17.00 
.25 00 
36 00 
.25.00 
..19.00 
..44.00 
.7995 
190.00 

..29.95 



KEYS 

Bencher & Vibroplex,. Less 10% 

Bencher is now improved. Sc re ws& springs, all stainless 

steel and extra hand polishing, 

NyeESK-0O1 Keyer ..58.00 



TUBES 

Collins & Drake Replacement tubes. 

GE 614GB.. , 

3-5O0Z „ 

GE Industrial Tubes 



. . . , . - - m J ■ I 



...Stock 
..12.95 
109 95 

Call 



GE12BY7A ....7.00 



■ i i r i i |-b ■ »i 



%_3 E. DJ JUl_/i _ a MB 1| ■ ■■■■ Hiivi a Tiiri + -----■■>.-- 
\Jl C. DH-jT-T i I t ■ ■ % ■ a , p - - - - ---- .. ....... hu> d jiiii.a: 

12JB6SyJvania 

Hard to find Tubes 50-90% off list 

^J w U* lJ r i b m i i i i 1 1 ■ k i i ■ ■ ■ w m r ■ ■ ■ ■ 11 it ■ ~ ■ ■■ * i r - - - - ■ ■ - - - ■ 

6JE6C/6LQ6 , 9.95 

BOOKS 

We stock SAMS, TAB, ARRL, RSGB. Ameco Radio 



.12 95 
.1600 
...600 

.995 



.Call 



Pubs. 

New 1 987 Radio Database Book - International SW 
plus reviews ; ,„.,12.95 

PARTS 

1.5 Amp/40QV full wave bridge rectifier 1.95 

2.5A/l0O0PIVEpoxy diode 29 each or 19.00/100 

.Q015/1QKVor.00l/20KV , 1.95 each 

«31 T LV I -I ■ .B r B B 1 -I 1 ■ r B - ■■■ ■ --■ ■ ■■ B I --_,, ..- ..- _.. ,1 ■ILbBBBdl.BBBBIBI I BBJ U V 

4 inch ferrite rod 1 .95 

365pF cap 1 95 

Sanyo AAA.AANfcads w/tabs 2.00 

2,4,5,6,8 pin mic plugs 3.00 

1/8, 1/4, watt carbon resistors .05 each 

Meters 0-30O0V DC 2Va" Square 0-1 Amp DC 9.95 

Drake— Collins mike piug.- 2,00 

Thousands of panel meters ..3.95 up CALL 

MICA Cap .0004/3KV... 5.00 others CALL 

Close out on rigs & accessories. Ail thetinne.. Call 

We may have what you're looking tor 

Diodes 3A/1 000 PIV 29 

Duracell9Vort Battery- 2 PakMN 1604 3.49 

DCFan3Vs"Sq. x 1'* 9.95 



SERVICES 

Alignment, any late model rig 
Flat fee Collins rebuild ;■-.-. 



.50.00 
....Call 



Call for latest used sear list 
(800)231 3057 



USED EQUIPMENT 

All equtpment. used, clean, with 90 day warranty and 30 
day trial. Six month s foil trade against new equipment. Sale 
price refunded if not satisfied, 

KWM 380/2CW 

ETO/ALPHA 77, Clean 

I COM I C 745 

TenTec 505 Argonaut 

YAESUFT101E 

YAESU FT 901 DM/CW 

Kenwood TS 630S/CW 

TS-430S/acc 

T3 520S 

Drake TR4cw, clean 

TOWER ACCESSORIES 

1/4' J E H S Guy cable. Rohn US. 10OO ft .250.00 

3/16" E H S cable. Rohn US. 1000 ft. 210.00 

174" Guy CabJe, 6100 #7 x 7 strand, import 15c/ft. 

3/1 6" Guy Cable, 3700 #7 x 7 strand, import I2c/ft 

3/8" xSE&JTurnbuckle 7,95 

3/16" Wire Rope Clips „ 40 

1/4" wire clips 50 

1/4 Thimbles... „.. 45 

Porcelain 500O Guy Insulator (3/16) 1.99 

Porcelain 502 Guy Insulators (1/4) , 3.39 

POLICIES 

Minimum order $10.00. Mastercard, VISA, orC.O.D. All 
prices FOB Houston, except as noted, Prices subject to 
change without notice. I terns subject to prior sale. Call any- 
time to check the status of your order, Texas residents add 
sales tax. All items full factory warranty plus Madison 
warranty. 

DON'S CORNER 

* Beginners Guide to Antennas & The Butternut HF-6V is 
the most popular Amateur Antenna being sold today. 
Thousands in use around the world today. 








^■■: 



CALL 







v 


Rrt^*lt»K> Rnirids 


|MMi> 




Fowvt 


* 


J^ 


; ^5#v 1Q0- 


2Qty 


w$to< 


W 


MF 


itS >50t 


500 




5 T*atH 




*,\ 


SB ■ ' *C 


SD 


::: n 


1 watli 


■■■■':i->- 


10A 


TOB IOC 


1QD 


./! 10E 


-.£&■**«! 


':'■•:' \>-^f 


1=>A 


2.5 B-- ;sc 


;^D 


25E 


''■■•&G'ta#» 


■ -:wh-- 


. ^QA 


?0B dQC 


>0D 


>0f 


.• J.00*atti 


■ WMi 


■$jMGfc 


KKjB T00C 


1Q0D 


106E 


■ 2 Shafts.: 


^iOH 


iWfA: 


,..Zi(3B 2^0C 


2S0D 


.-3S0E 


■i09wa'ti;s.' 


■500H 


V00A' 


■■■■-^iBfe.., 500C 


5600 • 


r%« 


lOOOvvatfs' 


: 5O00H 


1000A 


1005R- •■■■•^<J00C 


tooop- 


1000E 


?5O0w*tfi,- 


'"2500H 




^fe# 




SOOOwafH STO0H 








. — „ , 



Electronics Supply 

3621 F.ANMINJ 
HOUSTON TEXAS 77004 

1-713-520-7300 OR 1-713-520-0550 



^25 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



New ICOM Call on the fC-^AT. IC^38A. IC-03AT 

73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 67 




AM SATS 



Andy MacAlIister WA5ZIB 
2310 Romayor Court 
Peartand TX 77581 

STATUS REPORTS 

Another exciting month of ex- 
cellent satellite activity has 
passed, and our ''repeaters in the 
sky T ' are constantly changing due 
to eclipsing and other factors. 
This month, I will begin with com- 
plete status reports on all of the 
hamsats, and then I'll round 
things out with some hints on 
antennas for successful OSCAR 
operation. 

I wttl not get into product re- 
views on the various antennas, 
but will describe their charac- 
teristics briefly, I will bypass many 
of the equations and physics in- 
volved and will simply look at 
systems that get results, For those 
of you who are just now joining 
this on-going hamsat conver- 
sation, beg, borrow, or steal the 
last three issues of 73 and get 
caught up! 

Radio Satellites 

The Soviet Radio satellites, 
RS5 and RS7, have once again 
entered eclipse season. This is 



when portions of certain orbits 
pass through the shadow of the 
Earth, meaning drastically re- 
duced operating time for us. 
RS5, whose batteries are virtu- 
ally gone, wilt yield almost zero 
activity. Although sources in Eu- 
rope have reported that both 
satellites will be off till mid-March 
(about the time you read this), I 
have found RS7 to be active for 
at least half the passes I have 
monitored. 

RS5 will not be heard very of- 
ten, if at all, while in eclipse. Due 
to the battery problems, solar 
power is its only source of energy. 
When the satellite is overloaded 
with too many high-powered up- 
link signals, it wilt turn off, A com- 
mand station must send the cod- 
ed signals up to the satellite to 
turn it back on again, This doesn't 
happen over the western hemi- 
sphere. All I can suggest is that 
you monitor the CW beacon on 
29,451 MHz when RS5 is expect- 
ed and use QRP— less than 100 
Watts effective radiated power 
(erp)— when attempting to access 
the transponder. 

The same power rules apply 
to the two-meter uplink of RS7. 



Although its batteries are in 
somewhat better condition, heavy 
overload has occasionally turned 
off this satellite. The downlink 
signals from RS7 have not been 
very strong lately but the DX 
has been available to those 
stations with the better antennas 
for the ten-meter downlink sig- 
nals, Watch for the beacon on 
29.501 MHz, 

As of this writing, RS9 and 
RS10 are still earthbound. The ex- 
treme cold in the Soviet Union at 
the Plesetsk launch site has de- 
layed activities there. I hope to be 
reporting on new hamsats in orbit 
next month. 

In the meantime, I have includ- 
ed a frequency-planning chart for 
the new RS birds by WA5RON 
(see Fig, 1). Note that the RS10 
ROBOT uplink frequency is in the 
15-meter Novice band, This cer- 
tainly has possibilities. Refer to 
last month's column for more de- 
tails on RS9and RS10. 

UoSATs 

The UoSAT series of scientific 
hamsats continues in good 
health. Several of you have report- 
ed success hearing the two-meter 
beacon signals on 145.825 MHz 
with HTs and simpte rubber-ducky 
antennas. Several attitude 
changes have been under way on 
UoSAT-OSCAR 11 to invert the 
spacecraft. Typically, UO-11 is 



iSnHU.S.} Navieff/TegfinictBTl Saml 



Q 

CD 

O 

or t^ 



I 



HS-lONtodeKorTUphnk 



J L 



21.1 



11 



12 



i 

o 

CD 

o 
or 

EC ni 



13 



14 



15 



ie 



17 



IB 



19 



21.2 



J L 



£1 20 .27 .28 



E 



J L 



29 21 3 



15m 



i 

J L 



RS-S Mode A DownJirk 



CQ 



s ■- 

ru EC 



n j 



31 



.32 



s 

u 
I- 

o 

CD 

o 



.» 






35 



3S 



,3? 



jza 



39 



J 

29.4 



RS-10 ModE A or K Downlink 



cm 0- 



J L 



J L 



??. & 



47 



.48 



49 



?9. '.?. 



10m 



I 



s 

-2 

ME e 

**1 



RS-3 Mode A Uplink 



J L 



14&.8 fll 



.B2 



J L 



ftS-iOModeAUptink. 
TDownhnJi 



J l L 




.83 



M 



45 



86- 



67 



&e 



89 



146.9 



Ki &5 



97 



&e 



99 



146.0 



2m 



Fig, 1. Frequency-planning chart for the new RS birds. 
68 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



oriented in a stable gravity-gradi- 
ent-locked position with the cam- 
era end always facing the Earth. If 
you cannot find the satellite's bea- 
con on, it is due to the many exper- 
iments that the folks at the Univer- 
sity of Surrey implement from time 
to time. 

AMSAT-OSCAR1Q 

AMSAT-OSCAR 10 has provid- 
ed some surprisingly good activity 
lately. Stations from Kuwait to 
Borneo have been heard and 
worked by stateside hams. Unfor- 
tunately, we will have little or no 
use of the satellite until May. 
Since the ground control stations 
cannot change the satellite's ori- 
entation in space, its behavior due 
to things like precession and 
nodal regression can be predicted 
as is shown in Table 1 . 

These calculations were provid- 
ed by Ross W86GFJ, using a 
computer program developed by 
Jim G3RUH. The most important 
items in this chart are sun angle 
and percent illumination. Sun an- 
gle refers to the orientation of the 
satellite with respect to the sun's 
radiation. Zero sun angle occurs 
when the sun's rays are perpen- 
dicular to the plane of the solar 
arrays on the spacecraft, giving 
100 percent illumination. When 
the angte hits 90 degrees, we 
have virtually no illumination of 
the solar cells. 

The other numbers on the 
chart, the Bahn coordinates, tell 
us when the satellite's antennas 
are pointed at the Earth, When the 
longitude is 180 degrees and the 
latitude is zero, AO-10 is aimed 
at the middle of the Earth when 
at its highest point or apogee, 
During the year, the latitude will 
move only slightly, but the lon- 
gitude shows a continuous trend 
to smaller values. For us, this 
means that signals will be best 
early in each orbit, later in each 
pass, the antennas will be aimed 
away from the Earth and commu- 
nications will be very difficult or 
impossible. 

I am assuming that the sateflite 
will survive the period in late 
March and early April when the 
sun angle will be so bad that all 
active systems on the satellite 
most likely will power down and 
the batteries wifl be discharged. 
AO-10 has done well in this type of 
situation before, but there are no 
guarantees that things will be 
easy again. If you find the satel- 
lite active, keep your erp down to 
100 Watts or less on the 70-cm 
uplink, avoid operation around 
perigee (possible eclipse peri* 



800-882-1343 



f TTfJ 




IC-735 


List 


Juris 


l0735Gen.Cvg. Xcvr 


$999,00 


Cal!$ 


lC-75lAGen.Cvg.Xcvr 


1649.00 


Call $ 


R7000Gen,Cvg. Rcvr. 


109900 


Call$ 


R7lAGen. Cvg, Rcvr. 


949.00 


Calls 


IC-27A/H FM Mobile 25wf45w 


429/459 


Call $ 


IC-28A/H FM Mobil© 25w/45w 


429M59 


Call$ 


IC-37A FM Mobile 25w 


49900 


Catf$ 


ICM7A 440 MobHe 25w 


54900 


Call$ 


1C-04AT UHF HT 


449.00 


Oali $ 


!048AUHF45w 


459.00 


CaJIS 


IC-38A FM Mobile 25w 


459,00 


CallS 


IC-02AT FM HT 


399.00 


CallS 


IC-u2ATMiCfOHT 


329.00 


CallS 



KENWOOD 




— " TS-440S/AT 

TS-940SAT Gen. Og, Xcvr $2249.95 Call $ 

TS-430S Gen. Cvg, Xcvr 819.95 Call $ 

TS-71 1 A Al! Mode Base 25w 899,95 Call $ 

TR-751 A All Mode Mobile 25w 599.95 Call $ 

TM-201 B FM Mobile 45w 369.95 Call $ 

TM-2530A FM Mobile 25w 429,95 Call $ 

TM-2550 A FM M obi le 45 w 46995 Call $ 

TM-2570A FM Mobile 70w 559.95 Call $ 

TH-205 AT, NEW 2m HT 25995 Call $ 

TH^ISA^mHTHasltAlt 349.95 CallS 

TH21 BT 2M HT 259.95 Call $ 

TH31BT220HT 269.95 CallS 

TH41BT440HT 269,95 Call $ 




FT 757GX 

FT-757GX Gen. Cvg, Xcvr 
FT-767 4 Band New 
FT-270RH FM Mobile 45w 
FT-290R All Mode Portable 
FT-23 R/TT Mini HT 
FT-209RH RM Handheld 5w 
FT-726R All Mode Xcvr 
FT-727R 2M/70CM HT 
FT2700RH 2M/70CM 25w 



I 

1- p 


B' 




995.00 


CallS 


1895,00 


Call $ 


439.95 


Cafl$ 


579.95 


Call$ 


299,95 


CallS 


359,95 


CallS 


1095,95 


CalES 


479.95 


CalfS 


599.95 


Ca 


IIS 



JUN'S 




LECTRONiCS 



3919 Sepulveda Blvd. 
Culver City, CA 90230 - 272 ' 



PRICE 
CUTS 



Mmw%m®> wmm&Mwip 



NEW PHONE: 214-395-2922 FOR SUPER FAST SERVICE! 



LOWER 
PRICES 



COMMANDER XT 




BUDGET ENTFIY SYSTEM 

A Compile 1 Driw* System of Economy 

i Ccf^[r.|ir>Jer *T . CKvt .. I ■ 

em EkukH l^aiifAjb CaEnrnflr«U- Uimi 
: jU mil x^i.i i:-^ . ■■ i ^utfir 1 

• Bt;lori'M«»oefcfBiT** G*-siih- Aj.ip"" 
' 4 1 : ■ i- ■ »-:n-a:i1 ■ ■li::iin. Cipr.'n.ii: ■ . 

inc k iighis" 

' Jirflfca H lj>y#lll#< III ,1 ■■■„.. I ■,; i-iI.i-i' 

1 All tHKHUi;. H;,||-, ,-■■„■;■ !.'► ,1 I'll I. ImiI 1 

■ A..: • n- .1.,., M.|,-l. f4\fr '.^■l,l f 



i .!■- ..■'■ , 



IBM rc/: 

COMPATIBLES 



COMMANDER XT 





Special . . 



S447 



XT GySlpm FcmruItfHiCT ft*0lt CurrrmOnntr ■ Udmlrta-d ^«M 
drwr .mailed tug*- grad* svEleri cxm' I Sa) *aii nrs*#i ivtit 

■ ■ Jth r,rtl:l«i'i- & (pi.*:..., "' 

Special $259 

INTRODUCING OUR NEW 
TURBO AT COMPATIBLE 



Plus $12.00 shipping each 




THE EXECUTIVE SYSTEM 

A 2 Drive SysH&m Loaded With EniriiS 

$629 

| | MMANlJt '"I Xl Brijt* IS?** Mm !■::.■, i r.l ■ "■■ 

. and i*j0 *ViMI Piiifif Suit , 
A I ftfttmartf /•■ " • \a\ - ' , 

Dififci-O \r.v 6ei i i ... •>. i. i ,. 

Puhi Uii .:).■■ -h i. H ■•■ ■!■ irt ■■■ ■ 



Dual Speed IBM AT CompaUfcH* 

fe - WH* W38& AT CnrnpMMSlif Miinticurd 

' h - Rant InsmilMi lup id 1 Usg on bcardi 
Eie- -i l: k^*-t^pivifti- w-'baLiffv buctup 

F_,n f iDinpal bie SIOSi W-.iirn il> U fn A 
AJD Wail Ul ^pj-Hf.vPri H'lmvi Si,:|^iy 
AT F>yiH;<V Cai* *Hh *ryncFi 
L :LHiU Al rnr'itr F-nr-l «.pynn;i>n 
I J MP, rr WOKB Flo^v U r "* 4 
^D NDiFlHtpv COntFi^ci 
*-i!^*fnitil«?'J *H3 TdBted 




TRS^&O 

MODEL III 

CPU BOARDS 



20 MEGABYTE 

MASTER BUSINESS SYSTEM 

OUR MOST POPULAR SYSTEM OW SALE 

ma 

i.'-.il-,. .i . .. ... j. |H i^mvit ^n.U.r.1 

■=.|y^[ .am ■.:: kVi-i I','*- "...w.lv 

, , -, i i- . .-. |i | .| r... i .i. 
I :;■ . . t : 
. i>' 4. II. .,i '. rl.|ll Hi-,ijf.i , . . 

• - hi n ii n n- .. .•.,•■ • 



I iMIFFOHvl^PI V 

hflMntrbow ■■■ -Mjrtiiiis 

UiW ifli*J* iV'lf' I SO Vharji 

1*1 i-oiii ant} o1h€ii f.^m 

ui-f-IS C j. i ^ l<vT«HWlf 

*j^itprflOMiR*W Gnc- txiflch J'oic m fiu-h board is fjaMv 

jpthjii i»i1 hip | ,i:nxfi5 rh^| rij)n? hjiij )ll rrw :jni. >.i=-IpcI flvpl 

*«>mc>H*di f *i " .. .i ■ i-i i.ii.j.i r ■*■ .-..! (h'/Llpf- f-J3.ao 



EVEREX MODEM 



20 Megabyte hard Disk 

System includes Drive, Con- 
troler, Cables Manual 1 Year 
Warranty , $369 



BUILD YOUR OWN CLONE 

H*<: >■ ".Ot" CAipEi' I "* Wntlpt ,'Wflint>aard'i3flK f .• . . 

COMMANCl^ft X) 4 >'" spnd MwMxtirl WiC^-nn>dMdEi 
Ian: :■: rn<i M»i iMatrte in im wau**y Uo WW im i*am 



$1069 
$49 



Complete 20 Meg AT wtlh TTL 

Monitor $1699 

Add Si 5 Shiopmg 




lun^: Ti -1. :h-iji" lIpQigSilttiLKllnlcinall^iicaid W.kIi-t 

It" PPM » li.ilftVSiillW.Jif-- h-,iljif:, I ,ill Ii .V r ri l! "" m ^'LC'i 
IV lMl'-Vi,|i:h -yPf,il* S1C5 

i:dl>J Dj-juiuluurn-. S209 



IBM PC/XT SOFTWARE ETC MASTER POWER PANEL 



CQPV||?t 

CilPVllPC OPTION BQABD 

MlflflOH HJirnHHM.KHjn*^ 

TaKlra word PrOCfliSQi 

Q-Mjrl^ld: ,l' D'au n v-*i 

PFllAiTMAb"r-P 

PuBLIC £>OM*rN ifJFFWAHE 
M 0O/Oi»h 



PCWH|T£ 

CHURCH MANAGE ME Nl 
STOCK iha^:kinu 
PC DEMO SYSTEM 



PC lALf SPRE^pS-ILtr 
REiAH, tiAUti UUI^KS,. 
FAflM- ECONOMICS 
CClMO&Ci'lliS TRACKING 
PFJD-CC-MU COMU 
DOS-FILE UTILITIES 



*:■ ferwl ^jrps p-olc^l-ig ^:fiBI*n poi*fi» -f i.-.'ii m il Mi-fll wch 
fcflyr.B'alp ilinminiixd iwilch W -each fjl '■>••• . ■ . ■ ■ <*y' *l 
■ . hn'l calL.1 'U j:n;: Suiijei'Sr?*^ D'MBC'iOO D*n«l In* 
ft»i-pfcnitAii? flfiWfwrrCorW&uWi " ■' I 

Hri,in.,i Special 1 $47.95 



i#8||Bj 



DIGITAL DRIVE DIAGNOSTIC 



iillllhlLi 



Trai 1 H'iQ Aiq" -N-jur o*i r ' dii^i nfinq 

^Dur DonnpulSf WITHOtfT a Scop* &r 

i**Hy «gipm#m Eaiy lo uje «nd *c- 

cutjUb 1 T»[» 5C41«tl. Cld«nu*-nij. ftiifln 

>n#fii AzimuN-i Myai4r*h4 fQ* 10" Pt C0fiMt*>* M^ nO'? 

•.Lii>u'i..i«'i iiuiuoioi n^san Alignniur.! D-a-K PiLvia^i AiX> 

^J■c'PC^! | l^l■.tnsnl l c Wbhuji (■• 



PROTECTED POWER STRiP 

&,■ j*flL*Wl ' |Wm* illurtiii iti(«d B*j|I ■ <■ i ,jiNtMSiii^ ,. 

inir art:.** ■ nul S6 95 



FLOPPY DRIVE CASE 






W-d-Limijrt-, vTfipHl.lilt' 1 W/IJ* 


I ILK! 


41 Uh.j 4 ia.iii Mill a turtle TiirtB WJHJQS 1 OK 


11 H 


OlSKMlifDC Par Sflr. CHiGflmw-'CdOW 


ifl- 


ftippi 1 DibN Ch-iKUlitir \*Ay la <? J"!* WiC«Jl*«- 


IJO 


kaf?i? flfli vf. cr.iN l Hik t H w;C*flL E"S 


I1W 


u.l:.j.f : i t-c: 2D'i:-a FU.L hjih Di±^ Cirl <ii<ieiii« 




dish r jpariff ny L0*(i 


»i if 


CutiK'Wrirra Qm|Shi{-t<ii:M'iil^ IHM iifeCl 


m 


yijM..i|.hijiiis"'JiSfilOf C^a/d 


Mi 


Hare Cimpiir*;lft- Mnna ui dmh iV^ul! 1 putl 


ITS. 


t'VtflEK b'J+KANCEPl EG-^ WVpr'nl*! ^n..-' 


«1» 


tTdEflEK li&J Qi\UDiMTEflN*L MODEM 


11 J: 


iVEflE X r»386 5f"t f niJP Hf.J*flD FOft XI 


>LOW 


Pa r^W print** ar^plc 


171 


Se'i»i*kSi'nt famrti AdAi^vi 


■ie 


AT PAFJ. SE HIAl. AtiAP 1 > - 


ti* 


A 1 ^l L"if*f v ■HAflD DRIVE CO^TflfH E H 


iiOf 


ATriETflCAFiD 


JUD 


at case 


I» 


BMii TT PAfl PfliT+TEFi CABLE 


UD 


IBM l?FT Ffl»*TFH PA+H PflUNltPCAFJL [ 


SIT 


BM « ft StFjIAL CAtlL E DB ia U F 


tlfl 


CrjF VI^C'IOPT K'JN BOARD 


i-l H 


PC r .X? KFrwJAHtJS -OEM 3-lbO STVLE 


■^^5 


SULfCTHiC i?T -nm; CflEAT FEEL 


isa 


ATST-fLE K0DFORJIT lllUPF*VQFi|M 


s-.n 


hi - 1 ?. T 1 1 = iVIl A ^ 1- PAM « $ E CUflSOH f'AD 


•M 


L'A'-if HlGH^AADE SLIDE HI ' 




itfiHtdfVpftH&ie. 


ii- 


E*5C HIGhOHADF Fl^' (OP 




w.'HAflnw*HF 


t3.' 


Sa M -II J ■5h>npir , si p6r c flSeF 




:b:; latest if.l:^ j*^*N DftWCS 




(M.'&TfS 


SB« 99 


a*8^W*i«i'CHIPfli 


12 T 


h-4K H*H| ! il"««PTil 


15 


• ^: •' t(l .'xb^ a 3Atdrt-, 


tfl 


i? co«?os*rEVtcheOMaNiion 


u« 


► 2 TTL MdMW-'HHLlMt UOfH FOR 


i*ft as 


I'lOH HF.ij FK'i&HO*inORS 


■ IQir. IJ19 


-...^ vriNncflSMnsi.i'FJiBHiFftOi 


1*H 



■snDSi Dimtlifi W>EnM*ioprB i.hIi#I» ■flGFiprl}:* 
r..h,H l.ip..Li-."i>-Ll f - DiW.flft" IlJ-St 



Shipping S3.&U p«i order Uirt»#5 otherwise StaLed C CO add H SO ftmrfl T?x<33 residents 
add 6i?5^i> (ax Cerrrlied Check of Moray Ordti shipped aamo or nsjfl day Petao^al 
Clvecks rnny be h*ld 10 days. C.O.D- 4>rd«r* welcomed- Give us a ca<t t,l\4) 385-2 VH. We 

5hip UPS grdund Air jvanaDle 91 eura chairrje G<ve us a call tor ■«•( lrl*r»Clly ierglce. FREE 
1lymr S*ni wrih JTMCfi order VISA.'MC ADD 4*t. 

Non delecl^fl '-elMrri^ suhiecr 1« reslack lee ' % " '" |1?H '*'" 

AHUClO CQMMMV CprrtBur-f'J , £i*ci'wtfC S*fd'jn''r " Q- Son STZ. Ccrjnm#fir(. r tit t ;j*2i 



IFJA1 PC HT >*rtniiSli?iei] lia^lH ■■*!■ I' 
irHe^Tiatii^id' ^i-i''^^ Sw).*: h nr-- t!"--' 

Dealer lrtq.mn#* Welcome 



Arnold Company Also stocks 
a full line of RF & Computef 

Connaciors Call us for 
competitive pricing 

*«116 



OSCAR MODE-J FILTERS 



PREVENT DESENSE OF YOUR DOWN-LINK RECEIVER 




MMf200-7 $49.95 PSf432 $89.95 

(usually sufficient) (for extra protection) 

|.L@145 0.5dB \l- @435 0.1 dB 

Loss @ 435 40 dB min Loss @ 145 70 dB typ 

Send 66 c (3 stamps) for detailed specs on all VHF & UHF products. Shipping FOB Concord, MA 



SI 



SPECTRUM INTERNATIONAL INC. 



(617)263-2145 



P.O. Box 1084S, Concord, MA 01742, USA 



HnMCou 




ii 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio + April, 1987 69 



ods) P and listen to the AMSAT nets 
for the fatest news on operating 
conditions. 

Fuji-OSCAR 12 

Fuji-OSCAR 12 continues to 
provide us with excellent SSB and 
CW QSOs. The satellite does not 
have enough power available for 
continuous mode JD operation, 
but we are hoping that some digi- 
tal operation can be scheduled on 
a regular basis soon. 

In the meantime, we have had 
five days of mode JA with two days 
of recharge (no operation) per 
week. It is not easy to adjust ro- 
tators every two minutes and 
keep up with the rapidly chang- 
ing frequencies due to Doppler 
shift, so many of those now on 
FCM2 have added or are thinking 
about adding some sort of com* 
puter interface to their rotor sys- 
tems. Accessories like this are 
helpful, but are not necessary for 
enjoy able FCM2 contacts. Ad- 
dress your basic system needs 
first before worrying about the 
bells and whistles. 

ANTENNAS 

To build or to buy— the choice is 
yours. Today, we have several 
manufacturers involved in satel- 
lite antenna design and produc- 
tion. Dishes are not common for 
amateur-radio satellite operation, 
but if someone offers you a forty 
footer with free installation, let 
me know if you don't want it! 
The most common antenna sys- 
tem for the serious satellite chaser 
includes a pair of crossed yagis, 
one for two meters and another 
for 70 centimeters. A ten-meter 
dipole, vertical, or three-element 
yagi will provide mode A downlink 
capability. 

Some manufacturers and dis- 
tributors include KLM. Cushcraft. 
Telex/Hy-Gain f and Spectrum In- 
ternational. Of their antennas, the 
most common ones heard on the 
air are from KLM and Cushcraft 
This is likely due to their estab- 
lished positions as makers of a 
large variety of antennas, includ- 
ing those for OSCAR use. The 
Telex/Hy-Gain satellite antennas 
are relatively new. A review can 
be found in the February, 1987, 
issue of 73, 

Since most amateur satellites 
are configured for circular polar- 
ization. so too are most of the an- 
tennas manufactured for the earth 
station. The "sense" of circular 
polarization is right- or left-hand- 
ed. This circular polarization can 
be created using the crossed-yagi 
design by feeding one of the yagis 







SUN 


PERCENT 


BAHN COORDINATES 


DATE 


ANGLE 


ILLUMINATION 


LONGITUDE 


LATITUDE 


Mar 


5 


65.1 


42.1 


148.4 


11.5 


Mar 


12 


72.0 


30.9 


147.5 


11.1 


Mar 


19 


76.8 


19.4 


146.7 


10.6 


"a I 


26 


8S.1 


e.s 


145. B 


10.1 


Apr 


2 


85-6 


7.7 


146.0 


9 7 


Apr 


9 


79.5 


18.2 


144.1 


9.2 


Apr 


16 


72,8 


29,6 


143 3 


8,7 


Apr 


23 


66.1 


40,5 


142.4 


8.3 


Apr 


30 


59.3 


SI,0 


141,6 


7.8 


May 


7 


52.6 


60.7 


140.7 


7.3 


May 


14 


45.8 


69.7 


139.8 


6.8 


May 


21 


39,1 


77.6 


138.9 


6.4 


May 


28 


32.4 


84 + 4 


138.1 


3 . 9 


Jun 


A 


25.7 


90.1 


137.2 


5.4 


Jun 


11 


19.0 


94.6 


136.3 


4.9 


Jun 


18 


12.3 


97.7 


1354 


4.4 


Jun 


25 


5-7 


99.9 


134.6 


3.9 


Jul 


2 


-1,0 


10O.0 


1337 


35 


Jul 


9 


-7,7 


99.1 


132.8 


3.0 


Jul 


16 


-14.3 


96.9 


131.9 


25 


Jul 


23 


-210 


934 


131 


2,0 


Jul 


30 


-27.7 


88.5 


130.2 


1.5 


Aug 


6 


-34.4 


82 - S 


129 3 


1,0 


Aug 


13 


-41.1 


75.4 


128.4 


0.5 


Aug 


20 


-47.8 


67.2 


127.5 





huq 


27 


-54. S 


S8.1 


126.6 


-0.5 


Sap 


3 


-61.2 


48.2 


125.7 


-1.0 


Sop 


10 


-66.0 


37.5 


124.9 


-14 


Sep 


17 


-74 . 7 


25.4 


124.0 


-1.9 


Sep 


24 


-81.3 


15.1 


123.1 


-2.4 


Oct 


1 


-86.6 


S.9 


1 22 , 2 


-2.9 


Oct 


e 


-83.6 


11,1 


121,3 


-3,4 


Oct 


15 


-77.1 


22.3 


120.5 


— o ■• y 


Oct 


22 


-70.3 


33.7 


119.6 


-4.4 


Oct 


29 


-63.4 


44.8 


118.7 


-4. a 


Hov 


5 


-56.4 


55.3 


117,8 


-5 3 


Nov 


12 


-49.4 


65.1 


117.0 


-5.9 


Nov 


19 


-42 + 4 


73.8 


116.1 


-6.3 


Nov 


26 


-35.4 


81.5 


115.2 


-6.8 


Dec 


3 


-28 . 3 


88.0 


114,4 


-7.2 


Dec 


10 


-21.2 


93.2 


113.5 


-7.7 



Table 1. 1987AMSAT-QSCAR 10 attitude predictions, 



90 degrees out of phase with the 
other. The sense is selected by 
switching a delay line from one 
antenna to the other. Some of 
these antennas also use element 
staggering to achieve the circular 
pattern. 

When purchasing a satellite 
antenna, you must consider sev- 
eral things. These include per* 
formance, price, and reliability. 
In most circumstances, you would 
consider more gain to be a de- 
ciding factor, but for satellite 
chasing, more is not always bai- 
ter. A forty-foot dish has a lot of 
gain at 70 centimeters, but it 
would be quite a chore to keep 
up with a low-orbit satellite like 
Fuji-OSCAR 12 as it goes from 
horizon to horizon during a 20- 
minute pass. 

This also holds true for large 
yagi arrays, They might be good 
for moonbounce, but they are 
very difficult to steer accurately 
and quickly for most satellite 
work. Although the inclusion of 
stainless-steel hardware increas- 
es the price, it does improve re- 
liability. 

Polarization-switching relays 
also add to the antenna cost, but 
provide more versatility for op- 
eration through satellites with dif- 
ferent circular sense. I would 



suggest a two-meter crossed 
yagi with 14 to 22 elements and 
a 70-cm crossed yagi with 16 to 
30 elements. Larger arrays with 
stacked antennas may be ap- 
propriate after you gain some ex- 
perience. 

For the antenna builder, there 
are many antenna types from 
which to choose. Several cross- 
yagi designs have been described 
in publications like the ARRL 
Handbook and the VHF-UHF 
Manual from the Radio Society of 
Great Britain. 

A favorite home-brew antenna 
is the helix. It looks like a cork- 
screw with a reflector plate in the 
back. Building on© for two meters 
is quite a chore, but for 70 cm it is 
a fine performer and not unwieldy. 
Due to excellent broadband char- 
acteristics, its dimensions do not 
require the same precision during 
construction as a yagi. Its only 
shortcoming is that it cannot be 
switched from one sense to the 
other. It is either wound for right- 
or left-hand polarization. 

Other useful satellite anten- 
nas not typically found in cata- 
logs include VHF and UHF quads 
and turnstiles. For two meters, 
the quad is not large and won't 
exhibit quite the signal-fading 
symptoms experienced by linear 



yagis pressed into satellite ser- 
vice. The turnstile is simply a 
crossed dipole suspended above 
a reflector to give a nearly om- 
nidirectional horizontal pattern. 
More detailed information on 
home-project satellite antennas 
can be found in Martin Davidoff s 
Th€ Satellite Experimenter's 
Handbook. 

Some Satellite-Station Setups 

From the sound of it, amateur 
satellite chasing requires sig- 
nificant antenna arrays. Fortu- 
nately, this is not always the 
case. Although the newcomer to 
space communications may find 
minimal systems unsatisfying, 
the activities of some stations are 
very thought-provoking. Doug 
WBSIRI has been monitoring FO- 
12 using a whip antenna in the 
garage with a Hamtronics pre- 
amp and downconverter to a Ken- 
wood TS-120S, Jody N5HQM has 
made several F012 QSOs using 
a Diamond XL-200 dual-band 
base-station antenna, a single run 
of 9913 coax, a Yaesu AD-2 du- 
p lexer, and a Yaesu FT-726R 
transceiver with a two-meter pow- 
er amplifier. 

Scott WA5LHM has been able 
to monitor AO-10 using a two- 
meter mobile antenna in the 
shack with a Kenwood TS-711A, 
Courtney N5BF has monitored his 
own signals through FO-12 using 
a quarter-wave "mag-mount" an- 
tenna in the attic for transmit on 
two meters and a rubber ducky on 
70 cm for receive, The rigs were 
ICOM with a duck-mounted 
preamp. 

Perhaps the most intriguing ac- 
tivities are those of Chris N5JHM, 
who has made mobile-in-moiion 
QSOs via AO-10 from his pickup 
truck using a Kenwood TR-751A 
with 5/8-wave whip for receive and 
an ICOM IC-471H with whip an- 
tenna for transmit. These contacts 
were possible due to the antenna 
orientation of AO-10 in recent 
weeks. 

The challenge of satellite oper- 
ation with simple setups can 
provide a very enjoyable pursuit 
similar to long-haul DX on the 
shortwave bands using milliwatt 
transmitters. Come on up and join 
the fun! 

A FINAL NOTE 

The Tuesday-night. 75-meter 
AMSAT nets have moved from 
3,855 MHz to 3,840 MHz, plus or 
minus 1 kHz, This was due to the 
crowded conditions in the Gener- 
al-class portion of the band. Nets 
start at 9 p.m. local time.B 



70 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 





Announcing The 
Digital Voice Keyer 

Suggested Amaleur Net Price $24 9. 

Now for the first lime you can enjoy 
the truJy unique operation of a Digital Voice 
Announcement System, designed specifically for Amateur Radio com mini cat ions. The 
D VK-100 represents the latest technology in digital audio processing. 

Create your own natural voice contest calls, CQ's etc. Your voice is stored in digital 
memory, ready to he played back at the touch of a key The Digital Voice Keyer Is not a 
lape recorder or robotic sounding synthesizer but a true full fidelity natural voice 
record/playback system. The DVKMOO. is a must for the avid contester and great audio 
accessory for any Ham Shack. 

FEATURES 

•Superior natural voice quality •Selectable audio compressor 'Micro-processor controlled 

•Seated memhrane keyboard *32 seconds of message time *4 independent voice memories 

»PTT/VOX operation *Positive"negatJve keyed PIT *DyiLarnirj'condensor mic input ■ESD/t'MI'R II shielding 

'Selectable monitor amplifier with preset levekonlrols 'Selectable end of transmission tone generator 



DIGITAL VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT SYSTEM 



i0 



SOUND OFF 
MODEL-10 



Thz MODEL- 10 is a 100% solid-state digital voice storage and announcement system designed 
specifically for applications where repetitive high quality natural voice announcements are 
required. 

The MiODEL 10 stores your natural! voice message in nonvolatile EPRQM with single message 
lengths of up to 2 ruin in length. 

The MODEL \i) provides for both single play and continuous play modes plus factory setabfe 
internal timers are provided for applications requiring automatic timed announce Hie nls. 

The MODEL 10 can be configured as a radio station ID. AH control functions and timers tire 
provided for this application. jCOR sense, transmitter activity sense, PTT IDiimer| 

The MODEL 10 is a self contained unit complete with ease and power supply. 

The MODEL 10 provides the ultimate alternative to magnetic tape systems. The reliability of 
100% solid state technology plus other features like nonvolatile memory, superior audio quality, 
easy louse interface and extraordinary versatility makes Ihe Model 10 an obvious choice when a. 
message announcement system is needed 

TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR MODEL 10 

•Voice Evacuation *Fire Alarm Messages +Radio Station ID*Sound effects* 

•Talking Signs *Exhibits& Displays "Rental Car Return Instructions* 

•Farking Warnings 'Music On Hold ■Automobile Safety Systems* 

Tlw sound «f Uttrftttixnt \.i ritrrruduy. Ctiniart yunirJixHl Am;it«uT r^dio dcakr or NTLfffr more irvformatlwi. Dealer inquiries iri*U*d, 



LKI 



NEL-TECH LABS INC., 28 Devonshire Lane 
Londonderry, NH 03053 (603) 434-8234 



^130 



THE VOICE OF 
CLIPPERTON 

get the clarity and that unmistakable 
HEIL SOUND for yourSSB that helped 
make the Clipperton '85 OXpeditton 



so successful 

HCS 
$99.00 

head set 

69-00 w/8 pin 

mic plug 

59.00 wt standard 

plug 


1 4 




ELHk*4» " 






* ©©©■; 





"Without the HEIL microphone boom- 
set, it would have been impossible to 
even dream of the 31,000 QSO's we 
fogged, " —Rusty Bpps f W60A T 

CUpperton Project Manager 



MEiL 

5PUP5 



HEIL SOUND, LTD. 
Heil Drive 
Marissa, IL 62257 
618-295-3000 ^109 



Where's my 

CATALOG? 




What? You haven't seen the FflEE DICK SMITH 
ELECTRONICS catalog? Or did someone steal 
your copy again? After all. who can resist 1 48 
coiorf u I pages c ra mm ed w i t h 1 000 r s of electron ic 
goodies ranging from kits & components to com- 
puters & radio- control fed cars. The selection is 
incredible, the values are even betterl Top it all off 
with our exclusive 1 5-page electronic data section, 
and you" II have more than a catalog, more than a 
reference: it's a totally entertaining experience for 
the electronic enthusiast and rt h s FREE! All we ask 
is your name, address and $ 1 .00 for first-class 
postage. What are your waiting for? Order yours 

today? 




Send my copy of the \ 936/87 DSE 

Catalog tdday 1 Enclosed is S 1 00 tor postage! 



/Vamp 



Address 



Crtv 



Stale 



DICK SMITH ELECTRONICS, INC. 

P0 Bo* 2249. Redwood Oty, CA 940S3 




I 
I 



CIE 



Cleveland Institu 
of Electronics 



Accredited Member National Heme Study Council 




CIE is the worlds largest independent 
study electronics school. We offer ten 
courses covering basic electronics to 
advanced digital and microprocessor 
technology. An Associate in Applied 
Science in Electronics Engineering 
Technology is also offered. 

Study at home — no classes. Pro- 
grams accredited and eligible for VA 
benefits. 



Cleveland Institute of Electronics 

1776 East 1 7th Si., Cleveland, Ohio 44JI4 

YES?! I want to get started, Send me my CIE school 
catalog including details about the Associate Degree 
program. 

Print Name 

Addles*— 

City 

Age 



Srate. 



Api._ 
_Z,p_ 



Area Code/Phone No^ 



Check box forG-l. Bulletin on Educational Benefits 
D Veteran Q Active Duty MAIL TODAY f 



AAR76 



157 



' When You Buy, Say 73 



tt 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 71 




TTY L 



II 



P 



Marci. Leavey, M*D. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
PikesvffleMD212Q8 

APRIL 

I want you to check around this 
issue carefully, After all, any 
magazine that prints a "contract'' 
at the end of the Postal Statement 
{February, "What kind of dummy 
wastes time reading the fine print 
of the postal statement? . . .What 
further proof is needed that hams 
are crazy? Case closed."), or has 
me as a colum nisi, for that matter, 
has got to be suspect of publish- 
ing an ''April Fool" article. So, 
those of you, and from your letters 
there are a lot of you, who turn 
right to this column first thing are 
excused for a bit to go looking. 
You won't find it here. Don't wor- 
ry , I' II wait right here for you. 

C-64 RFI 

Back so soon? Hmmm, can't 
wait to take a look myself! Any- 
way, let's start out with a quick 
question posed by Bill Fletcher 
AF9B of Madison, Wisconsin, Bill 
writes, "How does one get rid of 
the awful rf from a C-64 when at- 
tempting to use it with a Kenwood 
TS-520S? The noise just plain 
wipes out most reception on the 
520S," 

One of the most common 
sources of RFI to the C-64 com- 
puter that I have heard about has 
been the type of interface, or de- 
modulator, used. Several of them 
have been named as rather potent 
RFI sources. You might see old 
columns for details on this one. 
Lacking that source, you come 
down to the computer itself and 
the interconnecting cables. Of 
course, anything that should or 
could be grounded should be. and 
any extra shielding you can put 
between interferers and interfer- 
ees (another point for the neolo- 
gists among you) may be sig- 
nificant, Let me know your results. 
I am sure there are others in the 
same situation that may well 
benefit. 

Amiga RTTY, Anyone? 

George 8. Miler, currently a 
computer science major at North 
Carolina State University, Ra- 
leigh, North Carolina, was attract- 
ed to 73 because of the RTTY cov- 
erage here, as he is interested in 
using an Amiga computer on 



RTTY, We!l T George, I have zip* 
parino in the way of information on 
the Amiga. Either no one out there 
is using one on RTTY (highly im- 
probable) or no one has let me 
know what they are doing (on the 
nose!), Wish I could help you, but 
it will have to wait until more infor- 
mation is available at this end. fn 
the meantime, if you have any 
success in your efforts, please 
pass it along so that others may 
benefit. 

Talking RTTY Remembered 

Wonder how many of you no- 
ticed the article in 73 two months 
ago, the RTTY issue, on 'The 
Talking Teletype/' I don't want to 
toot my own horn, but if I don 't who 
will? Such a concept was present- 
ed here in RTTY Loop several 
years ago r using a 6800 micro- 
computer to receive the RTTY and 
channel it to a Votrax Type "N' 
Talk speech synthesizer. The ef- 
fect was remarkable and a blind 
ham I knew was suitably im- 
pressed. No doubt that some of 
the newer systems could do far 
more with less work. It does show 
how far we have come. 

CoCo RTTY Questions 

That inevitable march of pro- 
gress has hit one of our gang, 
John R. Cooley KD9YK of Mor- 
rison, Illinois. John writes that he 
is an old-timer who is getting back 
into ham radio, He jumped from 
no ticket to N9FVK to KD9YK in 
six-week steps! 



His first question wonders as to 
the state-of-the-art software avail- 
able for the CoCo, be it the Crow- 
ston/Grosvenor described here a 
few months back or other. Well, 
the Grosvenor software does ap- 
pear to be the latest for the CoCo. I 
don't know what else may be in 
someone's beta test ready to be 
released, but the above-cited soft- 
ware is very good. I will be publish- 
ing a simple machine^anguage/ 
Basic loader CoCo RTTY program 
as soon as I receive an update 
from the author, hopefully within 
the next two months. This will not 
be a fully stacked bei!s-and-whis* 
ties program, but the price will be 
right. 

Question two Is a simple one, 
whether or not the commercial 
software will be compatible with 
the CoCo 3. i don't know. Most of 
the CoCo 1/2 programs are com- 
patible with the newer CoCo 3, un- 
less they use a certain area at the 
high end of the first 64K, which 
Tandy "reserved" for future use. I 
just don't know whether or not 
these programs will run and 1 
won't until I get a CoCo 3 or some- 
one tells me about it. Given the 
newness of the CoCo 3 t I'm not 
even sure that the manufacturer 
will know the answer yet. 

The third q uestion is one I shud- 
der at, and am forced to break up 
into three parts. First off t "Is the 
Pakratt, Heath t or Kantronics the 
preferred unit?" Come on! They 
are all clearly fine units, and which 
one you buy may well determine 
which one you like best, or vice 
versa. After all, Chrysler, GM, and 
Ford each have large numbers of 
folks who swear by, and at, each 
of them. But when push comes to 
shove, they really are all fine cars, 



Buy the computer you like, 
then the programming/' 



John has 'Meanings 1 ' toward the 
CoCo (Tandy Color Computer) as 
the machine to get for RTTY, es- 
pecially with the observation that 
the CoCo 2 can be had for less 
than $100 and the CoCo 3 for 
$220- (I have seen the CoCo 2 for 
less than $70 and the CoCo 3 for 
less than $200 in local sales— and 
less than that by mail order. , . 
milj Given that he wants to oper- 
ate several modes, including Mur- 
ray RTTY, ASCII, AWITOR, and 
CW, he poses several questions, \ 
shall cover them as he asked 
them. 



right folks? So, ask around, see if 
you can play with one or all of 
them, compare features and what 
you need, and make an informed 
decision, 

Part two of this compound 
question is that John is interested 
in the RS-232 port of the CoCo 3. 
Well, so am L The serial port of the 
CoCo 2 was driven by a software 
UART in what is commonly called 
a "bit-banger' 1 technique. This 
has the disadvantage of tying up 
the CPU for rather large chu nks of 
time, andsevereiy limits the ability 
of the program to do anything 



else. By contrast, the new CoCo 3 
still uses one bit of a PIA driven by 
a "bit banger/' but somehow al- 
lows it to be interrupt-driven, so 
that the CPU is not, itself, always 
tied up. Should be a bit more use- 
ful. Unfortunately, the solution 
that Tandy might have consid- 
er^, that many of us have done r 
was to use a true serial port, an 
ACI A chip, for RS-232 interfacing. 
This option will still be available 
for the CoCo 3 with an outboard 
board, just as with previous incar- 
nations. 

And the third part, now you see 
why I broke this one up, is the 
question of IBM compatibility for 
the CoCo 3. It's not 

Question four is not exactly 
RTTY, but it is cogent- John won- 
ders about the CoCo 3 as a video 
generator for ATV. Don't see why 
not, John, and the graphics avail- 
able, up to 640 by 1 92, for the cost 
can't be beat. In fact, a little later 
in this column I will tell you about 
one way to use those graphics. 

The fifth question is not about 
the CoCo at all, but another com- 
puter, John poses the classic 
question, and I paraphrase: What 
good is the thus-and-such pro- 
gram if I don't have a whoosie-bob 
computer? I have said before, and 
I will say again, buy the computer 
you like, then the programming. 
My own preferences do tend to- 
wards economy in computers, 
though. 

John poses a lot of good ques- 
tions, questions that I am sure 
have occurred to all of us at one 
time or another. I, for one, thank 
him for his interest, and look for- 
ward to hearing of his progress. 

A New RTTYer 

Another beginner in our midst is 
located right here in Baltimore! 
Craig Renier KB3KK is interested 
in RTTY but does not know if he 
has the right equipment. He says 
that he has a Heath HW-101 
transceiver and a C-64 computer. 
Well, Craig, you have an excellent 
start, About all you need is a pro- 
gram and interface, both of which 
have been covered well here in 
the pages of 73, and you should 
be on. Good luck, and keep us 
posted, too. 

CoCo 3 Graphics 
and Other Goodies 

Now, what was that I said about 
graphics for the CoCo 3? Our 
good friend Bob Rosen of Spec- 
trum Projects, Inc., has come out 
with the first graphics program de- 
signed for the CoCo 3, C III Graph- 
ics. Requiring a CoCo 3 with 128K 



72 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



•••••« 



YOURS FREE! FREE! 



Simply Fill In And 

Rush Mail The Coupon Below! 



3 EASY FAST STARTING BIG MONEY HOME BUSINESSES 
YOU CAN EASILY OPERATE FROM YOUR HOME 

PART-TIME OR FULL TIME 

No experience needed ... No obligation ... No risk on your part 

START COUNTING PROFITS IN JUST WEEKS 



YOUR RARE CHANCE TO START POCKETING SOME GOOD MONEY 

GET 3 FREE HOME BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 
But You Must Send Wealth Building Opportunities Coupon Below Now! 



COME INTO A BOOMING 
BUSINESS FIELD WHERE JUST 
PLAIN EVERY DAY LITTLE MEN 
AND WOMEN FROM DIFFERENT 
WALKS OF LIFE AflE STACKING 
UP HEFTY PROFITS . . LET US 
QUICKLY SHOW YOU HOW YOU 
MAY DO IT TOO ... NO SPECIAL 
SKILL REQUIRED . , . 

Don't you dare blow this chance 
to join many little men and 
women in this field who are fast 
"CASHING fN" operating spare- 
time and full — some are even 
making fortunes? 

So you see it doesn't matter, 
whether you are a factory worker, 
clerk, studenl, teacher, accoun- 
tant professionals and plain work- 
tng people alike — if your net 
worth is less than a half million 
dollars then by today's inflationary 
standards you're classified as a 
kittle man or woman." And 
especially for you and other truly 
ambitious little men and women 
We created what could be the 
greatest, most income increasing 
opportunity you have ever held in 
your hands BUT THE TIME IS 

LIMITED , 



WE ARE READY TO HELP YOU GET 
STARTED RIGHT AWAY! 

But You Absolutely, Positively Must Rush 
The Free 3 Proven Opportunities Cou- 
pon Below , , . 

• No Silly Schemes, Scams t Rip-Offs, 

• Nothing Complicated to Study or 
Learn. 

• And No Headache — Hassel or 
Delays. No Reason to be Doubtful* 
or Skeptical ^ 



DON'T YOU DARE MISS OUT ON 
THESE 3 FREE VALUABLE 
OPPORTUNITIES 



CLIP COUPON, 
MAIL TODAY 



Here's your success opportunity 
to join the many men and women 
who are pocketing big fast profits 
in this highly profitable Home 
Business Field . . . 



The sooner you get these 3 Free Ready 
to Start Operating "Easy Wealth Building 
Opportunities" — the sooner you could 
start enjoying the rich good life , , . 

SPARE TIME OR FULL TIME NEVER 

BEFORE ANY HOT NEW BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES LIKE THESE 

Success Can Be Yours Too 

Three 100% Legitimate Ways 

To Real Cash Profits , . . 



We Are Ready To Back You 

With Everything You Need To 

Get Off To A Fast Successful Start! 




IT'S EASY TO GET STARTED 



THE WEALTH POTENTIAL IS REAL . . . BUT YOU MUST ACT IN TIME 

Your No-Nonsense Chance To Stop 
Busting Your Hump Just To Make Others 
Rich And Start Gaining Fast Wealth 
For Yourself And Your Family 

Using Exactly The Same Kind Of Unusual Trade 
Secrets And Success Tools That Have Made Fast 
Fortunes For Others In A Booming Highly Profitable 
Insiders' Easy Money Field- For All 3 Easy Wealth 
Building Rush The Free 3 Home Businesses Coupon 
On Bight Now! 



MAIL COUPON TODAY ^NO OBLJGATION 



3 FREE Easy Wealth Building Opportunities Coupon 



Home Business Opportunities Dept.AR-i 

110 W 5th St., Winston-Salem, N.C. 27101 
Please Rush 3 Free Easy Fast Starting Wealth-Building Home 
Business Opportunities Right Away. Everything you send me is 
mine to keep without obligation. Show me how I can quickly start 
and operate a highly profitable home business of my own. 



DON'T DELAY 



Name 



Address 



ft •• + • •••• 



iL 



City 



State 



Zip 



of RAM and a disk drive, this is a 
320 by 192, 16-color graphics pro- 
gram. With ten sets of palettes. 
each with 16 colors, box, circle, 
cut-and-paste, paint, and all kinds 
of other nifty features, including 
loading and saving a high-resolu- 
tion screen to disk. Written in Ba- 
sic p thus able to be modified by the 
user a tad, this program repre- 
sents an excellent entry-level 
graphics program for what is sure 
to become a popular graphics ma- 
chine. And at $19,95, it's quite a 
bargain to boot. 

Bob has quite a few other good- 
ies for the CoCo 3. A memory up- 
grade to the full 51 2K can be had 
for $139.95—1 know folks who 



paid more for their 4K computers 
than that. And a book, CoCo fit 
Secrets Revealed, exposes the 
inner mysteries of this new power- 
ful machine for the hacker in all 
of us. 

Need 1 go on? Bob has all the 
bases covered, it seems, for those 
of us who are "into" Tandy Co- 
Cos. Drop Bob a line at PO Box 
264, Howard Beach NY 1 1414, for 
a full rundown on CoCo products. 
Don't forget to mention 73 's 
RTTY Loop as where you read it. 

To Come 

In the coming months, stay 
tuned for the above-mentioned 
program for the CoCo, as wel! as a 



look at some other innovations in 
RTTY that have, shall we say, 
changed our hobby significantly. 
As always, the fabled reprint list 
remains available for a little old 
self-addressed, stamped envel- 
ope. I fancy a change in the list 
within the next month or so, so 
those of you who have requested 
one before might drop me another 
SASE, and be sure to note your 
request for the "new' 1 list. That 
way, I will hold the envelope a bit if 
the new list is not yet ready. 

Your questions continue to be 
appreciated, of course. As you 
can tell from this month's column, 
they help provide a feel for what is 
going on in your minds. Send 



them to me at the above address, 
enclosing an SASE if you desire a 
personal reply, or via Compu- 
Serve (ppn 75036,2501 } or Delphi 
{usernarne MARCWA3AJR). 

As a parting note, do your duty 
and fill in that Feedback Bingo 
card somewhere near here. You'll 
help the staff of 73tell what you're 
reading, and stand to win a year's 
extension to your 73 subscription! 
Notice I said "extension. 1 * You do 
already subscribe, don't you? 
YOU DONT? (Not you ... I was 
talking to the guy next to you.) 
Then use the card above the 
Feedback card to subscribe. That 
way, you will be sure to see what's 
new In RTTY Loop.B 




UN 



i 



John Edwards KI2U 

PO Box 73 

Middle Village NY 11379 



MICROPHONES 

Hello, hello. Test one, two. 

Oh, hello there. Just testing my 
microphone. Wheeeee. Whoooo, 
Boy, this thing looks terrible. It's 
amazing the amount of effluvia 
(for want of a better word) a mike 
can pick up. Wow! Ever notice 
how a heavily used mike looks 
worse than the handset in the av- 
erage public telephone booth — all 
that brown crud and stuff and ev- 
erything. Yucch! Get out the Jani- 
tor tn the Drum , right? 

Anyway, where was I? Oh yes, 
microphones. Over the years I've 
been strangely attracted toward 
microphones. I don't think Tm suf- 
fering from a fetish, but I don't be- 
lieve it's a natural attraction, ei- 
ther. Perhaps it's caused by an 
unhealthy fear of Morse-code 
tests or something. 

Over the years, I guess I've 
owned something like three or 
four dozen mikes. Most of them 
have been absolute junk. You 
know, little 99-cent button jobs 
from Radio Shack that make you 
sound like you're transmitting 
from a Roman bath, or CB-type 
mikes with preamplifiers that drive 
your rig to something like two zil- 
lion percent modulation. They 
should give 'em away in Cracker 
Jack boxes. 

The best-looking mike I ever 
owned was this big chrome-plated 

74 73 Amateur Radio ■ April, 1987 



lollipop job that made me feel like 
H. V. Kaitenborn, Back when I was 
about 14 or 15, a childhood chum 
sold it to me for five dollars. I 
thought I had cut a real shrewd 
deal until WB2ZFF told me that I 
sounded as if I were transmitting 
from a Roman bath. When I un- 
screwed the top of the mike, it 
turned out that my buddy had 
swapped the original element for 
a 99-cent Radio Shack button job. 
Caveat emptor, right? 

Shortly thereafter, f journeyed 
into Manhattan (or The City/' in 
the vernacular of Queens resi- 
dents) to visit the Lafayette store 
on Union Square, At that time, 
around 1969, Lafayette was sell- 
ing a sharp-looking crystal mike 
for $2.99. This bullet-shaped 



boom attachment. That way, my 
shack was going to look like one of 
those super-duper operating posi- 
tions they were always showing 
in QST. 

So I headed for the subway with 
my pal Jon WA2MJK. I get to the 
store, go inside, point to the cata- 
log, and tell the clerk what I want. 
About five minutes later the guy 
comes back, puts the mike on the 
counter and says, h Yer in tuck. It 
was the last one left." I paid for the 
mike and the rest of the equip- 
ment, and with Jon En tow rushed 
back to the subway. 

God, that stand and boom kit 
was heavy. The thing used a 10* 
pound counterweight and had a 
20-pound base. Jon, seeing me 
struggling, offered to help me with 
the load. He took the quarter- 
pound mike out of my arms and 
asked, "Is that better?" I was too 
winded to reply. 

Finally, we arrived at the sub- 
way. We paid our fares and head- 
ed downstairs. After about a five- 



"In a flash, the Broadway local 

turns the microphone of my dreams 

into microphone scrap. ff 



beauty looked tike something out 
of a World War 11 spy movie. Like 
the 99-cent Radio Shack product, 
it only contained a cheap crystal 
element. But T damn, it looked 
good, with a sleek Art Deco-type 
styling and a business-like oiive 
enamel paint job. 

My plan was to spend the $2.99 
for that mike, and then blow an- 
other $19. 95 for a mike stand and 



minute wait, Jon says, "Let me 
see if the train is coming/' So he 
leans out over the edge of the plat- 
form, yeils T Ll l see two lights," and 
promptly drops my Art Deco beau- 
ty onto the tracks, In a flash, the 
Broadway local turns that micro- 
phone, the microphone of my 
dreams, into microphone scrap. 

I spent most of the next two 
weeks calling Lafayette stores for 



a replacement. As it turned out, 
the Japanese company that made 
the mike was no longer in busi- 
ness, and you can guess the rest. 
Sigh. 

Currently, I'm using a Kenwood 
MC-50. It's a nice mike, but it's 
been through the wars. During the 
past 10 years, I've used it to work 
all states, about 105 countries, 
and endless rag-chews on 15 
meters, Friends tell me it stil! 
sounds good, but it sure ain't 
much to look at. 

So I'm now looking for another 
mike to grace my shack. One of 
the old RCA jobs would be nice. 
You know the type l T m talking 
about. It's the one that David Let- 
terman has on his desk. It looks 
sort of like an overgrown aspirin 
capsule, with a wire mesh on top, 
an RCA logo near the middle, and 
some solid metal trim on the bot- 
tom. I'm sure this mike has an offi- 
cial name, and I know at I of you 
mike experts out there know it. 
But I don't, and I don't really care if 
you do, So don't bother writing to 
tell me. 

Anyway, I want to put this mike 
in my shack for display purposes. 
You know, something to show 
company when I take them on the 
KI2U grand tour. Somehow, it 
doesn't quite befit Mr. Fun! to 
have a junky, disgusting, spit-rid- 
dled relic exhibited at his operat- 
ing position. I want that beautiful 
RCA mike sitting there. As my 
brother recently said, "It'll be for 
showin\ not for blowinV 

If someone out there in my radio 
family has one of these mikes and 
wouldn't mind parting with it for a 
fair price, I'd sure like to hear 
about it. But, please, don't send 
me one with a 99-cent Radio 
Shack button element installed. 
I'm wise to that trick. ■ 



WE STOCK: 

AEA, ALINCO, AMP SUPPLY CO., 
ARRL PUBLICATIONS, ASTRON, 
B & W, BENCHER, BUTTERNUT, 
CONNECT SYSTEMS, DIAWA, 
HEIL, HUSTLER, ICOM, KAN- 
TRONICS, KENPRO, KLM, LAR- 
SEN, MFJ, MINI PRODUCTS, 
MIRAGE, MOSLEY, NYE VIKING, 
SOMMER, SONY, SPIDER AN- 
TENNAS, TEN-TEC, TELEX 
HY-GAIN, TRYLON WSE DOCK- 
ING BOOSTER, YAESU. 

Your Dollar will go further in Canada; 
Call Today To See How Far!! 



UPS SERVICE TO T| IE US MAKKfT 

SPECIAL OFFER 

[COM BP3 BAnfeR¥>ACK 
BS $ 19 M Postpaid 

include* CM2S Charger 

(To t*l V*J«* &S3 .75!} 

Supplies Limited^ nl« Dealer* 



The FM-240 for 2-Meters 



ifte^ 



COM- WEST RADIO SYSTEMS 

8179 Main Street 
Vancouver, BC Canada V5X 3L2 

(604)321-1833 

Credit Alfowed For Toil Calls 



TEN FM 



JOIN THE FUN and EXCITEMENT! 




9Z 



89 

FM.10KIT 

I". J.l. >>Hto*| 

FM 10 includes a two color, siJk screened, aJumrnum 
chassis, the deluxe CYBERNET (Hy Gam) CB board, True 
FM cti scrim in ator kit. crystal, jacks. pots, hardware and a 

thorough instruction manual. 



HAMFEST SPECIAL l 33.00 

Same as above, less chassis, hardware 

DISCRIMINATOR/DEVIATION KIT '12.95 

618-295-3000 

HEIL SOUND, LTD. 

Martssa. IL 62257 




Tt* Orte-StH) Parts House tor 10 FM> 




LASER PRINTED 
QSLs 

Top Quality • Low prices 
Write for Information 



THE LASER MRESS 



P.O. BOX H76 
MOUNDSVILLE WV 26041 



CB-TO-10 METERS 



We specialize m CB radio modification 
plans and hardware. Frequency and FM 
conversions, books, kits, repairs, high- 
performance accessories. Our 1 1th year* 
16-page catalog, $2. 



CBC INTERNATIONAL, P.O. BOX 3I500X 
PHOENIX, A2 85046 



J When You Buy, Say 73" 





II l| and IC's 

FASTDELIVERY 
LOWEST PRICES 

call Toll Free (800) 221-5802 



In-depth Fnvantory ■ industrial & Receiving Tubes 

813 S45 + 00 

6LF6 8*26 

6JS6C 7.46 

6CA7 6.91 

6MJ6 6\38 

8417 8,38 

20LF6 8.26 

CH EM TRO N ICS CHEMICALS 

TUN-Q-WASH-24 oz S2.42 

TUN-0-POWER f ,.32.47 

TUNEfl^ENU-16 oz.. .52.65. .6 OZ.. ,51.35 

FREEZE IT ,..,♦ $1-89 

Major Marsufaciurers Factory Boxed and Full line of 
Svf van ia EGG Repl acement Sern icond uciors „ ^ 

7**mw*l Q VUMWLSYUfAltlA 



Allow $3 UPS charge 



FM-2 




Priced To Sell! 




3-500Z . . . 


.595,00 


572-B ,., 


. ,75.00 


811-A ... 


,.15.00 


6146-B . , 


, . ,8.75 


8950 


,,12:75 


4CX250-B 


, .85.00 


SG613... 


. .10.50 



There is NO OTHER Transceiver 
on the Market Today that can 
Surpass the FM-240 in size, 
features, and Price! NONE! 



SANTEC 



COMPARE SANTEC WITH ANY 
OTHER RADIO BEFORE YOU BUY. 




ST-20T 5flVE 

» ■ fc W ■ p r j ce< j To Sell! 

* Has a 24-hour clock 

•Has rwo 7-digiJ outodio^er memories 

* A simple mod enables you to receive 
the 162 mhi weather channels 



# KDK • WEL2 • TOKVO KY-POWEJ? * 

See ENCOMM Ads -n National Moooiimw tor Derails I 



BATT£»VPAKS 
532.00 



KHKH tf-J. $1-1*4. Sl-iX. PJJP. S1.143. S1-H2. Sl-MM** 




\ 



TRANSLETERONIC 

m*u*i rjiirk 1 



Far Orders ONLY - Call Toll Re© 

4-800-523-0547 



NC Call <919) 993-S6S1 



' to 1 0:00 PM ESI 




Bex s, 1365 39th Street, Brooklyn. NY 11218 

Tel. 71 B-633-2800/ Walts Line 600-221-5802 

FAX # (71 B) 6334375 



The Nations Premier KD< 



wwrxfi 



RADIO 



SALES 



600 LAKEDALE ROAD, DEFT. H 
COLFAX, N.C. 27235 



FINALLY! 



HIGH QUALITY FACSIMILE 
ON A DOT-MATRIX PRINTER. 



€ 

jj 



m 



O 
2? 



O 

> 
O 




g 

< 

s 

AC 

O 



ac 
O 

Li. 
LU 






INFO-TECH M-800 ... YOUR "EYES" TO THE WORLD 



Copies alf speeds and IOC's. 
Positive/Negative, R-UL-R 
Automatic Manual, Line/Gray 



ss 



THE 



WIREMAN 



UNIVERSAL AMATEUR RADIO, INC. 

£V£3| 1280 Aida Drive " 104 

^■••^^ Reynoldsburg. Ohio 4306B 

PHONE: (614) 866-4267 



1-800-433-WIRE 



FOR ALL AMATEUR WIRE & CABLE 
Be f den & Equivalent 

(803) 395-4195 (So, Caro. & Ragchew) 



CERTIFIED COMMUNICATIONS 

ROUTE 2 -PUTMANRD, LANDRUM.SC 29356 



Pay TV and Satellite Descrambllns 

All New 6th Edition! *is2 



100 pages of theory and working schematics. 13 cable and 
7 satellite systems. Includes bypasses. Best reference 
available $14.95 Experiments with Videocip her. Tum-ons 
$9,95. C able TV , Function, bidirectional and security sys- 
tems $12.95 MDS/MMDSJHajidbook For hackers. $9.95. 
Build Satellite Sys tems Un der $600. $12.95. Any 3 for 
$26 00. New Winter '87 product catalog $1 



Stiojiki Electronics Corp-. 1327K 

Niagara St., Kiajara Falls, NT U303 COD W16-ZS4 2163 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 75 




K6K> PACKET 



Harold Price NK6K 
1211 Ford Avenue 
Redondo Beach CA 90278 

G&A 

This month, I'll answer some 
questions from readers. That's 
my way of saying I've really been 
stacked up with work this month 
and haven't had time to prepare a 
lengthy dissertation on any one 
subject- I'll be going to the Tucson 
Amateur Packet Radio meeting in 
a few days, where I expect to hear 
all about several new networking 
projects, and that will probably be 
the topic of next month's column. 
I'll touch on that a bit in this 
column, too. 

Comments on 
the Packet Survey 

I received several comments on 
the type of questions that were In- 
cluded in the Packet Poll, Gregory 
Lefebvre K5LTW wrote: 

"I have a few complaints about 
the quality of the survey. It seems 
that the questions greatly favor 
positive responses to the accep- 
tance of packet radio. I know that 
there are questions allowing for 
negative answers, but certainly 
not in comparison with the posi- 
tive questions. Also there appears 
to be an exclusion of other modes, 
or at least treating the other 
modes in the past tense. 

J, l would be interested to see if 
someone in the polling business 
might respond with some ideas for 
a future survey that might be 
somewhat better written to allow a 
more accurate description of opin- 
ions, whether they are positive or 
negative. I certainly felt that the 
questions did not allow me to ex- 
press my feelings about packet 
or how packet fits into my operat- 
ing time/ 7 

Td be happy to get suggestions 
for questions for the next packet 
poll. Notice I didn't say "next 
year's" packet poll; one was more 
work than I thought it would be. 

On the subject of beacons, Jay 
Underdown W0OGS writes: 

"I have been hearing and see- 
ing in the print what appears to be 
a diatribe against packet bea- 
cons. I agree for the most part, but 
beacons do still have a place in 
packet activity and supply useful 
information. In my opinion, the 
time and space spent condemn- 
ing beacons could be better used 



to educate new and existing pack- 
et radio users on proper beacon 
use and on methods of improving 
the network by such items as bet- 
ter external modems, GaAsFET 
preamps on receivers ; etc/' 

Jay makes a point in his letter 
that while beacons are usually 
bad in urban areas, they have 
their uses in less densely populat- 
ed areas, t agree that sometimes 
the beacon bashing gets out of 
hand, but that's largely a regional 
slant. 

Watchdog Timers 

I was sent a copy of a letter to 
the editor of the Chatter Bug, the 
newsletter of the Triple A Amateur 
Radio Association in Beaver 
County, Pennsylvania. KB3L 
wrote about a bad experience he 
had with his TNC "locking up/ 1 



prevent beacons and connections 
to a BBS from running though my 
station/ 1 

Way back in 1983, when a sec- 
ond-generation command set for 
TNCs was being discussed, the 
concept of lockout came up. At 
that time, we thought that this op- 
tion would cause more trouble 
than it would solve. Since there 
aren't any bits in the protocol that 
gets set for packets that originate 
at a BBS, and since beacons don't 
necessarily have the text "BEA- 
CON" in them, you are limited to 
locking out packets based on the 
origi nation station call or the desti- 
nation station call. 

Our feelings on the matter were 
that if other users were not willing 
to voluntarily avoid using your 
digipeater in ways you disagree 
with, locking them out personally 
by call woutd just propagate hard 
feelings. Going with "out of sight, 
out of mind/ 1 the BUDLIST/ 
LCALLS were originally oriented 
toward keeping the "bad guys' 1 
off of your screen by locking them 



"Yes, Virginia, 

packet forums 

Hamvention this 

on Friday, so 




there will be 
at the Dayton 
year: They'll be 
there early. " 



TNCs sometimes stop running 
correctly. This is referred to tech- 
nically as being M wedged," or 
OTL (out to lunch). Sometimes 
nothing bad happens, but some- 
times the TNC will turn on the PTT 
line to your transmitter in its death 
throes. 

KB3L points out that not all 
TNCs have a watchdog timer. 
This is a device that watches the 
PTT line and cuts it off if it is as- 
serted for too long. Some TNCs 
have a built-in watchdog and 
some don't. If you leave your TNC 
on when you aren't around, do 
yourself a favor and check to see if 
your unit has one. For those that 
don't have one, the manufacturer 
will usually have a recommended 
design for one you can add on. 
Give them a call and see. I'll try to 
get KB3L's design for a future 
column. 

Morality Through Software 

I got a letter from one ham 
which said, "Can you suggest any 
way t can selectively prevent other 
stations from dtgipeating through 
my packet station? t would like to 



out of your locaf monitor mode. 
They would still be repeated. 

Attempts to mandate morality 
through software are seldom suc- 
cessful at reasonable cost. My 
suggestion to this reader is to take 
some deep breaths or get a dog 
(it's been proven pets lower your 
btood pressure). Alternatively, 
some new software may have this 
feature; check around. A hard- 
ware box to monitor the incoming 
bit stream is doable, but it 
wouldn't be much less compfex 
than the TNC itself. 

Auto-forwarding 

John Skubick K8JS wrote to re- 
mind me that many readers are 
running low-end computers with 
their packet equipment, and that 
many authors are writing columns 
for the high-end machines. The 
Packet Poll certainly shows that 
there are a large number of low- 
end users out there, and I'll keep 
that in mind, 

John also asked for a short les- 
son on sending mail to distant sta- 
tions using the auto-forwarding 
system. Many BBSs can forward 



mail. To find out if your local sys- 
tem can, ask the local sysop, Of 
the systems that can forward mail, 
most do so with the following com- 
mand: S call @ bbs (for example, 
SWA2KDL@NK6K). 

The spaces are important. The 
command shown will send a mes- 
sage to WA2KDL at the NK6K 
BBS. You'll have to make sure 
that your local BBS knows how to 
get to the BBS call you placed af- 
ter the @. Again, ask your sysop 
to make sure. 

New Hams 

Christian V. Moreau N3FDP 
writes: "I not only worked to get 
my license as a result of packet 
radio, it is the only mode that I 
have ever used/ He goes on to 
say that he doesn't expect that 
this will always be true. He wants 
to try ATV and the microwave 
bands. 

That's what Td like to see more 
of, packet getting a different seg- 
ment of the population "hooked" 
on amateur radio. Once they're 
here, who knows what else they'll 
find that they'll like. It's sure that 
we need to keep new blood com- 
ing in. 

As I write this, an FCC notice of 
proposed rule-making has come 
in which proposes to take away 
part of 220. 1 haven't seen the text 
and won't comment further this 
month, but the comment period 
will close before t get to speak 
again. The procedure for com- 
menting to the FCC has been dis- 
cussed in a previous column. (Al- 
so see the QRX story on this 
subject. — Eds.) This is particular- 
ly disturbing since Skip WB6YMH 
has just gotten 9600-baud packet 
activity stirred up on 220.95 here 
in the Los Angeles area, 

How Soon We Forget 

Remember back in the dim dis- 
tant past when the new packet 
mode had to fight for space in 
the crowded two-meter band? 
Back when you had to petition 
the local frequency coordinating 
councils, go to meetings, write 
papers, or just squat on the chan- 
nel and make nasty "braap, 
braap" noises to build a home for 
packet? 

In the still fast-growing mode of 
digital radio, a new type of packet 
is starting to be heard, and some 
of the old-timers are starting to 
kick up a fuss about getting that 
new stuff on the traditional "pack- 
et 7 ' channels. The funny thing is, 
of course, that a packet "old- 
timer' 1 is anyone who's been on 
for a year, and the really ancient 



76 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



THE MOST AFFORDABLE 



;MJ=f.*i:|; 



ALSO HAS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE 
PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

(AND GIVES THEM TO YOU AS STANDARD EQUIPMENT') 



BAND WIRED KJT 
6M,2M, 220 $880 $630 

UHF $980 $730 

(Also available for commercial bands?) 



^^=^MA 



■""■fruit! 



iJ*iO* kiPH,,, 



FEATURES: 



♦SENSITIVITY SECOND TO NONE! 15uV Typ 
•SELECTIVITY THAT CAN'T BE BEAT' Bath 8 pole *Tal 

filter & ceramic filter for > lOOdB at t 12kHz Helical 

resonator from end to combat desense & intermod 
■flutter-proof squelch. Automatic frequency control, 

^parste spkr ampliNi'r 
• CLEAN, EASY-TUNE TRANSMITTER, up to 2QW output 

50 w Willi additional PA, 



ACCESSORIES 



Vf* 



*TD-2 OTMF DECODER/CONTROLLER kit only $78, 
Full 16 digits, S funetroni, toll call restrktor. program 
mable. Mitch more. Great for selective calling loo! 

•API AUTO PATCH kit only $78 Reverse patch St phone 
line remote control std, 

•AP-2 Simplex Autopatch, Use with above. 









- * v 



A 



YA 



i » ■ 



* * 



ft 



u 



*"iri' 



■A 



Yi 



<-/i 



Stf 



«**£: 



■_• 



•CWID kit. new Jo* price $48. 

F»ekJ pr ogrammabte, Timers, Vw works' 
•COR 2 kit $36 Audto miner, tocal spkr amplifier . tail & 

time-out toners 
•COff-3 kit. $48. with courtesy beep. 



I t 



1 t 



•MO-202 FSH DATA MODULATOR kit $38. Run up 10 
1?0O baud digits or packet radio signals through any 
FM iransm rtter. 

•DE 202 FSK DATA DEMODULATOR kit £38. 



GaAs FET PREAMPS 

at a fraction of the cost 

of comparable units! 

LNG-(*) 
GaAs FET 
PREAMP 

ONLY $49! 

WIRED/TESTED 

FEATURES: 

•Very Low Noise: 0.7d8 VHF, O.SdB UHF 

■High Gain: 1 3 20dB. depending on freq 

•Wide Dynamic Range, to resist overload 

•Stable: new- type dual-gate GaAs FET 

• Specify tuning range desired 26-30. 46-56. 137 1 50. 
1 50- 1 72. 2 1 230. 40O A 70, or 800 960 MHf 





LNW-(*) 

MINIATURE 

GaAs FET 

PREAMP 

Unbelievably 
Low Price — 



0NLY$19/kit, 

$34 



Wired/tested 



GaAs FET Preamp 

similar to LNG, 

except designed 

for low cost & small size Only 5/8 "Wx ]-5/8"Lx 

3/4 W H, Easily mounts in many radios. 

* Specify tuning range desired. 25-35, 35-55. 55-90, 90 
120, 120-150, 150 200. ?Oa270. or 400-500 MH* 




LNS-(*) 

IN-LINE 
PREAMP 



!•_%! 



Ht, 



3*1* 



•+u 



?**|, 



Vtfe 



-.< 



!**4* 



ONLY $59/kit, 

$79 wired/tested 

GaAs FET Preamp with features similar to LNG 
series, except automatically switches out of line 
during transmit- Use with base or mobile 
transceivers up to 25W. Tower rntg, hardware 
supplied. 

" Specify tuning range desired 120-175, 200-240. oi 
400 500 MH/ 




HRA-(*) 

HELICAL 

RESONATOR 

PREAMP 

ONLY $49 VHF 

or $64 UHF 



Low- noise preamps with helical resonators 
reduce intermod & cross-band interference in 
critical applications 

• Specify tuning range desired: 143-150, 150 158. 153 
162, 162-174.213 233, 420-450, 450-465, Of 465 475 
MHz. 



• R144VR220FMRCVRS 

for2M r 150 174, or 220 MHz, 

l&uVsens, 8 pole rtal & 10 pole ceramic if filters. 

hehcal resonator front end for exceptional selectivity. 

>100dBat 1 12kHz(best available anywtiere 1 ) Flutter 

proof squ£*c*i AFC tracks drifting wnus. Xtal Oven 

Ml Kil S13S. wfl SI 98 
•R451FMRCVR Same as above but UHF Tuned line 

front end 2uV sensitrvtty Kri only S 1 38, wft $198 
•R76 VHF FM RCVR for IOM. 6M. 2M 220. As above. Our 

*/o AFC Or hel r« Kits only $98 to % 1 18 
•RUG VHF AM RCVR for VHF aircraft or ham bands or 

UHF Kit only $98 

NOW^FCC TYPE ACCEPTED TRANSMITTERS. 
RECEIVERS, AND REPEATERS AVAILABLE FOR 
HIGH-BAND AND UHF. CALL FOR DETAILS. 



RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



S49 
139 
S69 



VHF 
MODELS 

Kit with Case 

MJt le&a Came 

Wired wfcm 

UHFMQOELS 

Hit wrmi Case *59 

Kit le» Case S49 

Wired w/cat« $75 




4. ill M.I. , 
H.L, U 1 , t j£H 

24 J3 

W S2 

1*4 14* 

14b 14? 

|44 144 4 

- 



Qulpm 
144 146 

ae-M 

144 146 

2630 

SSX! 

27 3T* 

2*» 

24- 3Q 



4J3-4M 
4 14417 

4U4M 



»2«f 



3S-JQ 

2 k- 3C 

MM 

14* 1 44 

SO 54 

CI 25 

422 444 

4JO450 



TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 



For SSB.CVV 
ATV; FM, etc. 
CanbeHrilKdc) 
with receive conv 
for iriincolvtt 
1 lo 2 Woui 
Linear Ph*% 
available up to 
SOW 



For VHF. 
MorJ«lxV2 
Kit $79 
Wired $149 
{specify band) 



FqrUHF, 
Model XV4 
Kit $79 

Wiretf$139 



fiifkr 

24 JO 
»3« 

2130 

37-37 4 

28U0 

>,o>.4 
144 I *i. 

1" Hi. 

IBM 
11-30 
61 21 

J4* i*N 



Ant 



144 144 

L4S 1 46 

50-52 

H4- 144.4 

220-224 
50-52- 
26-M 

432-434 

435^37 

439 2b 

4 32-474 



I HAMTRONICS, INC. ! 

I 65-DMouI Rd.; Hilton NY 14468*9535 

I D High quality equipment at reasonable prices surely | 

I appeals to me: but I want more details before I buy? Rush I 

J my copy of the 40-page Hamtronics catalog by return first i 

I class mall. I enclose $1 ($2 for overseas air mail). | 

i 



Name 



Address 
I City 



I 



State/ZIP 



•^ 






Order by phone or mail • Add $3 S&H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA. MASTERCARD. Check, or UPS COD. 



mlronics, inc. 

I M«D MOUL ROAD-HILTON NY 14468-9535 

'hOnO. 71 6-392-9430 Hamtiomcs* rs a mglstvred Itademark 



patriarchs are those who have 
been around for two years. The 
ink on the band plan defining the 
"traditional" packet channels is 
barely dry. 

The new kid on the block is ac- 
tually any of several new systems 
based on higher-layer protocols. 
Back in the anaiog vs. digital turf 
wars, the complaint was nasty 
noises in the ears. In new-digital 
vs. old-digital fracas, the com- 
plaint is nasty characters on the 
screen. 

Most of the new protocols (like 
those discussed in KASQ's net- 
working article in the August, 
1986, packet issue of 73) use the 
data portion of an AX.25 frame to 
carry the information from their 
higher-levet packet. Some of that 
data is control information and 
some is clear text. Depending on 
what kind of computer or terminal 
you have, this control information 
will print as Greek, lines and ar- 
rows , smiley faces, or if you have 
an old OSt computer, even pieces 
of the USS Enterprise. 

The control information is an in- 
tegral part of the new protocols, 
just as is the control information in 



the part of the AX.25 packet that 
isn't usually displayed in moni- 
tored frames. As development on 
these new systems continues, 
more and more of the packets you 
see on the air will contain "gar- 
bage/ 1 These systems have 
names like Gator, TexNet, TCP/ 
tP,and NetRorTL 

Building the amateur packet ra- 
dio network is like building a high- 
rise. We started to build the first 
floor, and while building the sec- 
ond floor, because it was cold and 
rainy outside, we all moved into 
the first floor, Because it was a lot 
more fun furnishing the first floor 
than it was standing in the cold 
building the second, most of the 
time has been spent in (or mag- 
azine articles written about) that 
first floor. But now there are a 
bunch of nuts walking on the tem- 
porary roof, pounding away at ail 
hours, and walking though the 
first floor carrying bricks and leav- 
ing a trail of mud. 

What am I saying here? The 
packet network is stilt under con- 
struction. You'll be seeing some 
funny characters in monitored 
packets, especially this summer. 



Once that second story is built, 
there will be new software, new 
terminal programs, and new op- 
tions to avoid seeing garbage on 
the screen. 

Until then, explore the ways that 
the current TNCs offer to avoid 
seeing trash. Most TNCs have a 
way to restrict monitored packets 
to a list of stations you want to 
see h or a list of stations you don't 
want to see. Many can filter out 
particularly annoying characters 
such as the bell and clear-screen 
characters. 

On the other hand, we must 
keep in mind the basic require- 
ment of JJ monitorability.' The 
third-party traffic rules as amend- 
ed by the FCC to allow unattended 
packet operation are based on the 
following thought: Whiie the traffic 
may not be easily monitored while 
in transit between network relay 
points, it IS monitorable at the en- 
try point to the network, 

Another point made by the ama- 
teur community during the 85-105 
rule-making proceeding is that 
there are a large number of folks 
"reading the mall" and carrying 
on the tradition of self-policing the 



ham bands. We've got to make 
sure that this continues to be 
true, even at the expense of a few 
extra bits. 

Dayton 

Yes, Virginia, there will be pack- 
et forums at the Dayton Hamven- 
tion this year. They will be on Fri- 
day, so get there early. The 
current schedule, subject to 
change, includes Bob Neben 
K9BL, Dave Pederson N7BNC, 
and the infamous Dr. Dave Toth 
VE3GYQ for the Fundamentals 
and Tutorial session from 1300- 
1445. The 1500-1700 session in- 
cludes Lyle Johnson WA7GXD 
and me on packet technical devel- 
opments. 

f T ll also be wandering the dis- 
plays at Dayton, but you probably 
won't see much of me at the 73 
booth; there is usually a sign post- 
ed prohibiting verbal dart throw- 
ing. Speaking of which, a friend of 
mine called the 73 subscription 
number to ask for a 73 subscrip- 
tion because of the great digital 
column. What he got was a year's 
worth of Digital Audio, See you 
next month. ■ 




OVICE NETWORK 



Perry Donharrt KWW 
73 Staff 

WHAT IS A NOVICE? 

What can you do with an FCC 
Novice license? Communicate, 
thafs what! You can talk with oth- 
er ham operators around the 
world, from Australia to Zanzibar. 
It doesn't cost a lot of money to do 
(in fact, the license itself is free), 
and you don + t need an engineer- 
ing degree to understand the elec- 
tronics required to pass the Nov- 
ice test. 

That's what this column is all 
about— how to pass that first test 
on the ladder of amateur radio. In 
the months to come, you'll learn 
everything that you need: FCC 
regulations, a little electronics, 
and the art of hamming. We'll be 
going pretty fast, since you're un- 
doubtedly anxious to get your own 
callsignl 

The Novice 

In the early sixties, the Amer- 
ican Radio Relay League decid- 
ed that the old system of two 
classes of ham licenses wasn't 
promoting growth in the hobby< 



They sat down and came up with 
a plan called Incentive Licens- 
ing, which divided up the avail- 
able spectrum into chunks, A lad- 
der of license classes was creat- 
ed, and the higher you could get 
on the ladder the more privileges 
you got. 

Incentive licensing has evolved 
into our present five-tier sys- 
tem: Novice, Technician, Gener- 
al, Advanced, and Extra. The 
amount of electronic theory re- 
quired to upgrade to the next 
license increases as you move 
up, but the privileges increase 
as well. An Extra-class licensee 
has alt amateur privileges on all 
bands. 



As a Novice, you'll be able 
to use Morse code on four bands 
and voice on three. You can al- 
so use your computer to talk 
over the air. You must pass a 
five-word-per-minute test on 
the code, and a very simple ex- 
am on electronics theory and am- 
ateur practices. The rules govern- 
ing Novices have just changed, 
and we haven't seen the full text 
of the regulations yet; In the fu- 
ture, 1*11 give you a full rundown 
on the new spectrum and modes 
available, as wet! as a summary of 
how the testing for Novices has 
changed. 

The Code 

Yes, you still have to learn 
Morse code to get a Novice 
ticket. Maybe next year we'll fi- 
nally have a code-free license, 
but for now you'll just have to 
do it. I won't give you any song- 



QU1Z 

1 . What are the five classes of amateur license? 

2* What code speed is required for the Novice-class license? 

3. What government body regulates ham radio? 

A. What is the symbol for current? 

5. What does the symbol E stand for? 

6. What is the voltage in a circuit with 3 Amps of current and a 
total resistance of 500 Ohms? 

7. What does Ohm's Law look like when solved for resistance? 



and-dance about how wonder- 
fully artsy code is (it isn't) or 
how it will "make it through" 
in an emergency when all other 
modes fait (it won't). The law says 
that hams must pass a Morse 
test, so just learn it because you 
have to. 

Obviously, I can't teach code in 
a magazine. Go out and buy one 
of the code-teaching tapes on the 
market— 73 happens to sell one 
that's pretty good. Most of the 
ones you can get are pretty much 
equal when it comes to ease of 
learning, but you should look for 
a tape that sends characters at 
13 words per minute with spac- 
ing set at five words per minute. 
If you learn code that sounds 
like ' daaaaaahhhh diiiih 
daaaaaaaaaaahhhhh/ 1 you'll be 
in for some real trouble when 
you realize that you have to copy 
code that reatly sounds like 4l dah 
dihdah." 

The other bit of advice I can give 
you is NOT to iearn code by writ- 
ing down all of the little dots and 
dashes and staring at the paper 
for hours. It won't work. You have 
to actually hear the stuff to learn it 
right- The absolute best thing that 
you can do is to get someone who 
will sit down with you and teach 
you code, Classes are OK t but 
one-on-one is the best method, 
I've been doing code lessons for 



78 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



years this way. and it seems to 
take about three weeks of lessons 
three times a week to get to five 
words per minute, 

Theory and Regs 

Apart from the code, you'll be 
expected to know the barest 
amount of information about FCC 
regulations and electronics theo- 
ry, As I mentioned, the rules have 
changed to allow Novices to use 
voice and data communication, so 
there should be additional techni- 
cal questions covering the new 
modes. I don't expect them to be 
too difficult, though, so not to 
worry. 

Traditionally, FCC reg ques- 
tions are best answered by relying 
on your common sense: Ques- 
tions pop up tike, "Is it legal 



ANSWERS 

i Novice, Technician, Gen- 
eral, Advanced, Extra 

2. 5 wpm 

3. The Federal Communica- 
tions Commission (FCC) 

4. I 

5. voltage 

6. 1 t 500 volts 

7. R = E/l 



to send unidentified transmis- 
sions?" (Hint: It isn't.) The theory 
section is pretty much the same. 
You'll need to know a few simple 
formulas and terms. 

What I'm trying to say is that 
getting a Novice license is easy. 
Note: This column will not teach 



you electronics! It will give you 
the information you need to 
get a Novice license, You won 1 ! 
find many theoretical explana- 
tions here. 

First Lesson 

OK, I've pretty much blown my 
space with a description of what 
it is you're getting into, but we'll 
do a quick lesson before your 
attention span runs out. One of 
the primary electronic principles 
is Ohm's Law. You'll run across 
it in one form or another in just 
about every field of the hobby. 
Simply stated. Ohm's Law says 
that the current in a circuit is equal 
to the voltage in that circuit di- 
vided by the totaf resistance: 
J = E/R. The symbol I is for cur* 
rent, measured in Amps; the E 



is for voltage, measured in volts; 
and the R is for resistance, mea- 
sured in Ohms. (I always re- 
member the formula with the 
phrase, "The Indian looks at the 
Eagle flying over the Rabbit.") 
Using a little algebra (did I men- 
tion that you need math, too?) you 
can come up with two other rela- 
tionships: E = IR and R = E/l, 
Simple, eh? 

Plug in some numbers to try the 
formula out: What is the current in 
a circuit with a total resistance of 
10 Ohms and an applied voltage 
of 50 volts? Since I = E/R, I = 50 
vo Us/10 Ohms; I = 5 Amps. 

I won't bore you with numbers 
to plug in ad nauseam. You get 
the idea. Try the quiz on the pre- 
ceding page and check how you 
did. See you next time.! 



PACKET RADIO 

^\ J Apple Macintosh 

* Enhances your TNC so you can enjoy 
Packet Radiol 

• Split screen display to separate, send 
and receive data. 

* Full Macintosh Uki Interface. 

• TNC Commands and Parameters on 

p oil down menus. 
■ Routing file for digipeater routes 

* Flie transfer using Session Layer protocol. 

* Command procedure files. 

* Free upgrades for one year after purchase 

* Packages and supported TNCr 

MacPacket/TAPRterin . . . 549,95 

T *PB TNC i AEATIK 

-H*f item** mr izm 
-rW^MHiH TNC-*» 

MacPacket/TAPRierm $49.95 

-TAPRTM ! -AIAPKII 

tlnlfi i II J «MU 

MacPacket/KANterm , $49.95 

k j ji I mi in * P.ii'h|ti ClJlltHHjiLlLaLDr 
fHIV I V7»* Kit" 2| 

available from dealers or from 

Brincomm Technology 

3155 Resin Street 

Marietta, GA 30066 



■ M 






102 



Tp bgUfZ W&flf 



**I26 



$29 90 
$ 38 90 
$39.90 
$3990 



3523 Dayton Avenue 
Lot**!*. K¥ 40207 
Telephone 1- 502^89^- in- 
complete Study Guide and Code Practice Programs. 
On dtfic lot the Commodore: C-64T2Q— With 1*541/ 1571 
drives* 
Novice J 19,95 W/Pnniing Disc 

Tech/Gen S 29.95 W/Prmiing Disc 
Advance $29 95 °W 'Printing Disc 

Exit* $29.95 W/PrintincjDise 

include* FCC POOL of question* for each class with right and 
wrong enswera—FOHWULAS— SCHEMATIC SYMBOLS- 
SAMPLE TEST QSO and" RAM DOM CODE practice programs— 
PRTMTinG DISC will allow you Lo dump a ny qn ies r io n * it h m u 1 1 Ip. It- 
choice answers to printer. Helpful Ed instructors to qui* students 
on a particular serjin e nt bein g ta u u \ 1 1 

Other Products Available on Disc 
Code practice programs {& to 30 wP«) 
Ham logging program twilb printout) .... 

Ham log norVdupe (For Held, day uw wrth printout) . . 

Products on Casiettc Tape 
Novice Sludy Gmde ... 
TecWGen Study Guide 
Code Practice A to 7 W PAY j 
Code Practice J? to ] 6 WPM > 
Code Practice (l 3 to 22 WPM) 

Product on Daiasiette Tape C 64 1 23 
Code Practice O to 30 WPM) 

Products on VC R/VH S Tape 



$9.95 
$9 95 
$9 95 

SI 0.95 
S 21 « 95 
s 5.95 
S 5 95 
$ 595 

S 9.95 



Code Practice 1 5 to 16 WPM) 
Code Practice i 1 1 to 22 WPM) 



$15.95 
ttf 



Two Meter Coffee Can Antenna 
An unusual antenna made with a coffee cam and a telescoping 

tod Has considerable gain over a RUBBER DOCK antenna for 

hand helds May be used wfth two meter base transceiver and 

linear Tested for 200 watts of power. 

Ideal for portable use. in areas where outside antennas are nol 

permided and during sevens Hveathei tthtifi xtfvtde attbennei 

should be disconnected, 

CoHee can antenna W/BNC connector . $14,95 

Coffee can antenna W/BNC connectors and cable . , . . $ 19-95 
Personal Checks Money Orders CQTJv 

I-. ,!,!.,' |ii»>|j f iiij) (CO-C- charges added) 



Introducing. . . . . ■ 





****** 



\** :' *&** ' x & * 



\ 






to 






*e* 




^1 



-V£ 






The 
"Hazer'!^! 1 
















Never Climb Your Tower Again! 

Are you uncomfortable with heights? Has your doctor advised you not to 
climb? Do you want to be able to install or maintain your beam in several hours 
instead of several days? 

If you answered YES to any of these questions then the HAZER is for YOU. 

HAZERS are designed to carry the largest beams up and down towers of ANY 
HEIGHT safely and quickly. All weight is transferred directly to the tower, and the 
winch assembly makes it possible for anyone to raise or lower an antenna weighing 
over 100 Lbs. with only ONE HAND. 

The HAZER is the ONLY way to safely and conveniently bring your beam down to 

you. 

Models are available for Glen Martin Engineering and Rohn Towers. 



GLEN MARTIN ENGINEERING INC. 

P.O. Box 7 253 

Boonville, Mo. 65233 816-882-2734 



^72 



.+ i j ' 



'♦jusS* 



i< 



When You Buy, Say 73 



M 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 79 




Michael Bryce WB8VGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massitton OH 44646 

QRP CLUBS 

Well it looks as if I'm going to 
have to skip a month or two before 
getting that Field Day column 
ready, I always forget about the 
difference between when I type in 
these columns and when the actu- 
al issue comes out 

After reading the past few 
months* worth of mail, I've con- 
cluded that everyone wants to 
know about the different QRP 
clubs. Some of the letter writers 
asked if there are in fact QRP 
clubs to join. Well, this month's 
column wifl be about these clubs. 

The Michigan QRP Club 

I'll start things off with the Michi- 
gan QRP Club, which is a member 
of the World QRP Federation 
This club was organized on Janu- 
ary 19 t 1978, by a small group of 
ham operators in the Lansing area 
of central lower Michigan. When 
the club first started operations, 
most it not all the members were 
from the area, hence the name of 
the club. The Michigan QRP Club 
has now grown to include mem- 
bers in 20 or more states, several 
Canadian provinces, and several 
European countries. The ctub has 
designated QRP as 10 Watts in- 
put or 5 Watts output or less. 

What surprised me the most is 
the club emblem. Each person re* 
ceives a club patch when he 
sends in an application for club 
membership. The emblem was 
designed and adopted during the 
early months of the club's exis- 
tence, when the founders were 
not seeing beyond Michigan's 
boundaries. In tact, the first ver- 
sion didn't even show the Upper 
Peninsula of Michigan. Since the 
emblem was made to be used as a 
patch for display on jackets and 
hats, it's very colorful. 

No matter what type of club you 
join, that organization needs to 
have a purpose. The Michigan 
QRP Ctub constitution states its 
intentions as follows: 

1) To foster and develop friend- 
ship and cooperation among ama- 
teur radio operators who have a 
common interest in the unique 
pleasure and challenge of operat- 
ing amateur transmitters at power 
levels of 5 Watts output or less. 



2) To sponsor such aclions and 
activities as may be deemed prop- 
er and consistent with the purpose 
of the organization, 

3) To take general interest in all 
matters affecting or involving am- 
ateur radio. 

If you're not a real diehard QRP 
person, the club has no restric- 
tions that you must run low power 
all the time. If it takes a kW to get 
the message through, so be it 
The member's good judgment 
rules on such cases. 

Any club worth its salt has some 
kind of award program. So, not to 
be left behind, the Michigan QRP 
Club has several to offer. The 
QRP WAS award and the QRP DX 
award are the club's two big ones. 
The WAS is, of course, Worked All 
States running low power, white 
the QRP DX award is given for 
working 25 countries while run- 
ning QRP. The club also gives out 
a QNI award for checking into the 
nets a minimum of 25 times. A 
special award is the WMA, for 
working at least 10 members of 
the club, with endorsements for 
1 5 and 25 members. A good pface 
to start for the QNI and the WMA 
awards would be the weekly nets. 
The Michigan QRP Club holds a 
net on 3.535 MHz on Tuesdays at 
9 p.m. EST. 

To keep all this together, the 
club publishes a quarterly news- 
letter called The Five Walter. It 
contains accounts of club activi- 
ties, technical articles, and corre- 
spondence from club members. 
Reports of awards, QRP contests. 



nets, and QRP operating are also 
included. Tom Root WB8UUJ 
does a bang-up job as the editor. 
Having been a member of this 
QRP club for a white, I can say that 
75 Wis packed Mt of QRP good- 
ies every quarter. 

If all this sounds too good to be 
true, then by all means drop a let- 
ter off to the Michigan QRP Club, 
5346 W. Frances Road, Clio Ml 
48420. If you decide to join, you 
become a member for life. The 
club dues are only $7. That in- 
cludes the first year of T5W and 
covers the S2 initiation fee. After 
that, the yearly dues are $5. 
That's not bad considering the 
price of postage these days. 

The G-QRP Club 

Moving to the other side of the 
ocean, we have the G-QRP club. 
The name of the ctub gives us a 
clue as to which country I'll be 
talking about— England. 

The G-QRP club was founded 
in 1975. and it now has more than 
4,000 members in 54 counlries. 
The club exists to promote inter- 
est and growth in low-power ama- 
teur radio communication (5 
Watts or less). Membership is 
open to any licensed amateur or 
shortwave listener anywhere in 
the world who has an interest in 
low-power communication. The 
annual membership fee is $10. 

The G-QRP club publishes a 
free quarterly journal called 
SPRAT (Small-Powered Radio 
Amateur Transmitters). It con- 
tains circuits, technical hints, and 
ideas for QRP construction 
projects. SPRAT also contains 
club news, contest and award in- 
formation, and other items of in- 
terest to QRP operators. 

Club members may also re* 




Photo A Terry N8ATZ, vice-president of the Hate Mike Bryce Ctub, 
pounds some brass for the 7985 W8NP Ftefd Day. Note the "hi-tech" 
CW radio on the same table as the Heath Apache and the Coffins 75A4. 



ceive low-cost Morse-code train- 
ing tapes. A data sheet service is 
provided free to club members. 
These sheets cover articles of 
QRP interest from different over- 
seas magazines, which may be 
too long to be printed in SPRAT. 
This list is constantly being updat- 
ed and new sheets are listed in 
SPRAT. 

The G-QRP club also runs its 
own free QSL service through 
which cards can be interchanged 
between members (cards are 
mailed with SPRAT. To top all of 
this off, the club offers a wide 
range of awards. Weekly club ac- 
tivity takes place each Sunday be* 
tween 1 1 00- 1 230 and 1 400-1 500 
UTC on the international QRP 
frequencies. 

To become a member of the G- 
QRP club, write to: Membership 
Secretary, Christopher Page 
G4BUE, Alamosa, The Paddocks, 
Upper Beeding, Steyning, West 
Sussex, BN4 3JW England. The 
stateside QRP operator should ei- 
ther send a $10 bill or a check 
made out for the amount of SI 2 
The extra $2 is to cover the con- 
version at the bank. Don't send 
IRCs, It will be the best $1 you Ve 
spent in along time. 

QRP ARCI 

The final QRP club 111 talk about 
has been around for some 20 
years. It is the QRP Amateur Ra- 
dio Ctub International, or QRP 
ARCI for short. This club was 
founded In 1961 by K6JSS. It's a 
nonprofit organization dedicated 
to increasing the worldwide enjoy- 
ment of QRP operation and exper- 
imentation. QRP, as defined by 
the club, is 5 Watts output CW and 
10 Watts output PEP. 

With a membership of more 
than 6.000, the club sponsors 
many contests. Among them are 
two large CW contests, one in 
April and the second in October. 
They have proven very popular 
with the QRP gang. Aside from 
these, the club has a wide assort- 
ment of awards. One of the most 
treasured of these is the t r 000- 
mile-per-Watt award. Working 
1 .000 or more miles per Watt may 
not appear at first to be a big deal 
Have you fried? Try it on 432 MHz 
with 5 microwatts output over a 
10-mite path. It's been done, but it 
wasn't easy. How about working 
Australia with 1 Watt output for 
12,000 mifes per Watt? Does this 
peak your interest? I hope so. 

Besides all the awards, the club 
publishes a rather slick newsletter 
four times a year, called the QRP 
Quarterly. Printed in January, 



80 73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 



New for 

KENWOOD TH21AT, 31AT, 41AT 
a Fastcharger 



aU*&L 





SPECIAL SALE! 




Now $49.95 



Save $15.00 when ordering 
charger with accessories kit. 

Features: 

• Charges in 15 m inut.es 

• Automatic Voltage cut-off 

• Battery doesn't beat-up 

• Modification to charge FB21H 
on request at no extra charge 



+ $3.00 shipping and handling 
FL res* add 5% sales tax 



I 



12v-14vdc input 
No memory 
Proven in daily use 



Optional AC adapter with DC and mobile cords 
avaUableSU^W- $9.95 



^46 



Call and talk with 

rtiarit0.RjfD Paul WWWIG-or 

V^llCllJItS IlILC 0r, »s f \ WA4DRV 

P.O. Box 17015, Plantation, FL 333 18 (305) 476-8580 






.,»^i^;, M ».» *"?,&*#£■ 




10 AMP 
SOLID STATE RELAY 

CONTROL; 3 -32 vdc f^-*^ 

m 



LOAD: 140 vac ID amp ■,« 



$9 50 EACH i0 FOR $90.00 



RECHARGEABLE 

NI-CAD {§|Ng 

BATTERIES c^& 

MA SIZEl.PbV SOOmAH'SLSS 
AA SIZE I 25V 5DOmAH$l_fl5 
AA Ait h solder tab S3 00 

CSIZE L.2V 1200mAH S3. 50 
SUB-C SIZE Salter tdb $3.50 
D SIZE 1.2V 12Q0mAH $3,50 



LIGHT 
ACTIVATED 

MOTION SENSOR 



This device contains a 

photocell which senses 

sudden changes in amlsi.ent 

light* When an object or 

person pas£es within it's 

field of view (about 15' ) 

it beeps for several seconds then resets 

Could be used as a doar annunciator or 

modified to trigger other devices* 

S 1/2" X 4" X 1" . Operates on 6 Vdc. 

Requires A aa batteries (not included). 




Catalog f LSMD 



$S 



7 5 per unit 



48 KEY ASSEMBLY 

JESS 





3rd TAIL 
LIGHT ? 

Sleek 
high-tech 

lamp assembly 
Could be 
used as a 
third auto 

tail light, emergency 
warning light, or 
special-effects lamp* 
Red reflective lens 
is 2 2/4™ x 5 1/2" 
is mounted on a 
4" high pedestal 
with up-down swivel 
adjustment* includes 
I2v replaceable by lb, 
CAT* TLB $3,95 each. 



NEW T.I. KEYBOARDS. Original V 
used on flewnpytarfc. these key- 
boards comain 49 £.P„S.T.meo> 
anicgl switches. Terminates lo 
15 pin ftwifieda?= Frame 4" x 9 H 
CAT#KP~48 S3. 50 e&uh 
\0 for $30.00 



FLASHER LED 

S voll operation 

|umboTl*fc Si£S 

RED FLASHER *T 00 each 

MEW GREEN FLASHER 

c>irjiftf?r?-^ij $1 do 



ULTRA-MINIATURE 
5 VDC RELAY 

FujilSy ft 
FBR2-MNEOO05M20 

Highseitsuivity 

COi'.: 120ohms t1.25 each 

CONTACTS: lamp 10 tor $10.00 

Mounts in 14 pin DIP socket 




COMPUTER 
GRADE 

CAPACITORS 







1,400 mid 200 Vdc 

1> X 2" dia. S2.00 

6.4O0 mfd 60 Vdc 

A 1/4™ Kl 3/8"dia.$2.5a 

7,500 mfd 200 Vdc 

S .1/4" n 3" dia. ?4.0Q 

1 2,000 mfd 40 Vdc 

A 1/A" a 2" dia. 52. b\) 

22,000 mfd 25 Vdc 

4 3/4- x 2 h dia. $2.5-0 

48.000 mfd 10 Vdc 

3" x 2 1/2" dia. $,2.50 



D.RS.T. LIGHTED 
ROCKER SWITCH 

H5 vat lighted roCkW- 
snap mounts in 
^b ' x 1 v&" hote 
Ofangaiens. 16 amp 
contact si .50 




TOLL FREE ORDERS 

• 1-800-826-5432 

(IN CA: 1-80U-25B-S6SS} I 

IHFO* (2ia>3BO-S0OO 
TWX - 5101010163 ALL ELECTRONIC 



QUANTITIES LIMITED 
MINIMUM ORDER J-0O0 
USA S3CQ SHIPPING 

HO C ' 
FOREIGN ORDEflS. 

INCLUDE SUFFICIENT 

SHIPPING 
CAUF. RES. ADD 6 1 Z*« 



MINI-PUSHBUTTON 

S.PS.T. momentary 

norm ally open 

WP busr>ir>g. 

Red button, 35taach 

10 far $3.00 



PACKET RADIO 
GOES PORTABLE 



THE FIRST CONTROLLER DESIGNED 
FOR PORTABLE AND SOLAR- 
POWERED STATIONS 




Model PK1-L 

Wf red /Tested 

List price— $209-95 

Amateur net -$179.95 



* LOW 25 mA Current drain, 

* Miniature sjse — Lightweight 
» All metal, shielded enclosure. 

* On-board Lithium Battery RAM backup. 

* On-board watchdog for reliability, 

* Standard DB-25 Connectors. 

* Output signal indicates "Connected" Status. 

* Does not require squelched audio. 

* 8K RAM-32K ROM, 

* Remote Command Mode for Unattended operation. 

* Hardware command lockout for security. 

* Commands compatible with our Model PK1. 
< Retains all other features of the Model PK1. 
■ E*fra I/O lines for special applications, 

* AX- 25 & VADC Protocols. 

Power requirement: 9 to 15 Volts DC @ 25 mA typical 
Dimensions: 4.6 X 5.9 X 1.0 inches Total Weight: 12 ozs. 

P least s-peciTy Call Sign. SSlD Number, and Node Number when ottering 
Contaci GIB for additional into aftd available options, 
We otfef 3 complete line of transmitters and receivers, strips, preselector pre amps. 
CWlD^ers & synthesizers for amateur & commercial use. 
Request out FREE catalog. MC & Visa weicorne. 



GIB ELECTRONICS, INC. 

151 Commerce Pkwy., Buffalo, NY 14224 716-675 6740 9 to 4 



17 



PORTABLE ANTENNA 






MODEL AP-10 

Designed for 

APARTMENTS 

MOTELS 

VACATIONS 

PRICE 

$51; 

Add S3 .00 

Shipping and Handling 



Quick Simple Installation, Operates on 2. 6, 10, 15, 20, 30 
and 40 meters, Af I coifs supplied, Oniy 22-1 (2 inches long. 
Weighs less than 2 lbs. Supplied with 10 ft. RG 58 coax 
and counter poise. Whip extends to 57 inches, Handles 
up to 300 watts, 
VSWR— 1.1:1 when tuned 

Witte tor more defalk and ottier B&W products ^ 53 

ALL OUR PRODUCTS MADE IN USA 



B*W 



BARKER ft WILLIAMSON 

Quality Communication Products Since 1932 
At your Distri batons writ© or call 
10 Canal Street Bristol PA 19007 

(245) 788-5561 



"When You Buy, Say 73 



tt 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 81 



April, July, and October, it brings 
all the latest information to the ac- 
tive GRPer. Each issue is packed 
with some of the best construction 
projects for the GRPer. Antennas, 
tuners, and DX-chasing tips can 
always be found inside the Quar- 
terly. There is even an article or 
two about solar-power QRP oper- 
ation from yours truly from time 
to time. 

The QRP ARC! also sponsors a 
first-Sunday informal QSO party, 
as well as several national QRP 
nets. The list of the nets was given 
in this column several months 
ago. 

To become a member, send for 
the membership guide from the 
club's publicity manager, Joe 
Sullivan WA1WLU (267 Sutton 
Street, North Andover MA 01 845). 
While I have never seen what 
Joe sends out, I hear it's a bundle. 
To keep Joe from tapping into 
his beer money, send along $1 
to cover postage costs. Speaking 
of money, new memberships to 
the QRP ARCI are $8; renewals 
are $7. 

Doing Your Share 

That's about it for the QRP 
clubs. Yes f there are some small- 
er ones about, but I hear very little 
from them. So here is your 
chance. Write and let me know 
about your small QRP club. 

There is one footnote that must 
be brought up. Almost every one 




Photo B. A Novice training class at the Massiifon Amateur Radio Club 
(W8NP). A talk about QRP and the lower cost of the gear may win over a 
few newcomers to ham radio. Photo by WB8QWM. 



of these clubs operates on volun- 
teer time, Working to feed the 
kids, the wife, and the dog some- 
times leaves very little for the ra- 
dio clubs. Don't get mad if it takes 
a few weeks to get a reply to your 
questions and letters. Also, be a 
sport when writing to any of these 
clubs and send an SASE. 

While we are on the subject of 
radio clubs, what have you done 
to spread the word of low-power 
operation to your local club? Most 
are just starving for a program at 
the meetings. QRP is a good start 
in such endeavors. 

Have you been active in your 
dub's Novice training? Your local 
club DOES run Novice classes 



doesn't it? The small size and 
portability of QRP gear is ideal for 
a hands-on demo at a Novice 
class. 

If you think that I'm leading into 
something, you're right. To get 
new people into this hobby we 
call ham radio r we have to make it 
fun. Nothing less will do. Take a 
took at Photo A. This is a W8NP 
Field Day setup. No, the photo 
wasn't taken in 1957 — it was in 
1985. We did it as a dare and to 
have fun. We even made some 
contacts with this setup. Most of 
the new Novices liked the look 
and feel of the vintage radios. We 
had a ball . 

Get active in the local club. 



While I don't quite know what 
came over the crew at W8NP, 
Steve N0CVZ and I were voted 
vice-president and president of 

the club, I sure hope they know 
what they did! Don't be an invisi- 
ble QRPer. Get involved. 

Till Later 

Looks like the old computer is 
just about done with this month's 
column. Next month, by popular 
demand, Til have the plans for my 
6L6 QRP band-buster rig. I'm sure 
you'll enjoy putting one together. 

As always, send your ideas, 
comments, and suggestions to 
me. I gather strength from them 
all. I ask only one thing, if you 
would like an answer or a circuit 
schematic, please send an SASE, 
In fact, III write the address down 
if you send along a stamp. 

While you're at the post office, 
remember to send the Reader 
Service card back to 73. Remem- 
ber in my first column I said I need- 
ed the money. Well, I plan to pur- 
chase a new bike this summer. 
What's this? OHMYGOSH, you 
mean to tell me that the guy who 
writes this is a biker? A long- 
haired, pot-smoking r hippy freak? 
No, really, I'm talking about bicy- 
cles, the people-powered kind. 
I'm going to do a column on very 
small, lightweight radios for back- 
packing and cycling. So until next 
month, use intelligence instead of 
power. It's a lot more 1uv\M 




OOKING WEST 



Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 
28197 Robin Avenue 
SaugusCA 91350 

INTERVIEW WITH 
A LEGEND: PARTI 

If t were to ask you who was the 
one person directly responsible 
for your favorite repeater • you 
would probably respond by giving 
due credit to the person whose 
caflsign appears on the system's 
identifier. Or, you might name the 
club that supports the machine. 
Well, you would probably be cor- 
rect on a tunnelvision-like scale, 
but in the overall cosmos of ama- 
teur relay communications, you 
would be very far from correct. 

If credit is truly given where 
credit is due, every FMer owes 
gratitude to a ham most have 
never heard of— a now-retired Los 
Angeles broadcast engineer 



named Arthur M, Gentry W6MEP. 

Art has never laid claim to hav- 
ing put up the world's first FM re- 
peater. If I remember correctly, 
Wayne Green W2NSD says that 
he and a friend put up a RTTY 
repeater in New York City in the 
late 1930s. But, there is a big dif~ 
ference between being the first 
and being successful on a long- 
term basis. In the case of W6MEP, 
his repeater (which was first oper- 
ated under the caflsign K6MYK) 
went on the air in the late 1950s, 
and one way or another it has re- 
mained in service ever since. 

Almost two years ago I visited 
Art. After the usual amenities, the 
two of us adjourned to his front 
yard where we sat down with my 
cassette recorder between us. 
What follows in this month's 
column (and is concluded in next 
month's column) was garnered 



from that interview and from up- 
dates from subsequent conversa- 
tions between Art and me. I invite 
you to sit back and read what I can 
only call an interview with a man 
who should be considered a leg- 
end in his own time. 

73: Art, when did you first put 
K6MYKontheair? 
Gentry: In September of 1956 we 
started operation. We went to the 
Mt. Lee site in October of 1958, 
but there were other sites in be- 
tween. The original license for 
K6MYK was issued in 1954 for a 
location in Burbank, California, 
but that was never used. The re- 
peater went to remote control in 
June of 1957 when we finally got 
on a hilltop, but we were already 
well-known from our operations 
here in the San Fernando Val- 
ley, i .It's been on the air ever 
since. (Note: Since the interview 
was taped, Art has moved his re- 
peater to the top of Mt. Wilson at 
an altitude of 5 r 6QQ f .) 
73: Do you know if you were the 
first repeater in the country? 



Gentry: I can't say that we were 
the first repeater in the nation be- 
cause at the 1954 ARRL conven- 
tion in San Jose, a group of people 
put up a 2-meter AM repeater in 
the Berkeley Hills. Later that year, 
we went on a vacation to Colfax, a 
city north of Sacramento, and we 
worked through the repeater for a 
distance of 300 miles down to 
Lemmore. That machine was 
K6GWE, and it stayed on the air 
for a few months and then report- 
edly fell by the wayside. It was not 
what we know of today as an open 
machine. Rather, it w&s on the air 
spasmodically. If you were lucky 
enough to get in when the guys 
had it on, that was fine. Other- 
wise. . . 

73: Do you know whatever hap- 
pened to that repeater? 
Gentry: Weil, as I remember, it 
came back on the air several 
years later in the San Francisco 
North Bay area. Actually, the ma- 
chine is probably still around . That 
is, you may be able to trace the 
lineage down to the present. It's 
still in the North Bay area, though I 



82 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



• SUPERSCAF • 

|A Super Swiiched-Capacitor Audio Filter] 



•IT 



%*>*r i 



»■ v r * 






I 



SupcrSCAF is an innovative, high pcrfcif* 
muna 1 audio filter. SuperSCAK in corpora Iqs 
Mutc-nl I he-art switched CiipaLitor fill er 
technology lo achieve unprecedented receiver 
selectivity and unwanted signal and noise 
rejection. Upper and lower passhand cutoff 
frequencies are digitally programmed via 
front -panel thumbwheel switches at incre- 
ments of approximately 10011/ between 2CKI 
and 3900 Hz.. 

SupcrSCAF is an easy to assemble kit which 
can oc completed in \ or 2 evening. Hi* 
kit features a single PC board and minimal 

Kt>int-lo- point wiring. 
r o adjustments or test equipment ore required! 



PRODUCT INFORMATION 



Bandwidth 

StuptMNi.l Atfrnuiihon 
Sfetn SUtyw 
Fitter Type 
Pajaband Ripple 
Ay din Power Output 
Power Requirements 
Price 

Shipping fit Hj lulling 
Overseu Shipp^ 



to 3700 B* 
Greater than 5t dB 
Appro*. ISOdB^Octavv 
Uth Order Elliptical 
I,r<ih<h<]ri(l J tlB 
1 .5 Walls 
I0G -130 VAC. 
1129 95 [Florid j residents 
ddd5%*tok-stJvl 
17 i id USA & CANADA 

>k Inquire. 



AFTRONICS, INC. 

P.O 80X785 
LONGW0O0. FLA 32750 



.-251 



^267 



for your 

FREE 
CATALOG 

DIAL 

1-800-426-2653 
or write: 

CABLE 
DISTRIBUTORS 

116 MAIN HW 
WASHINGTON, AR 71862 




• Prints high quality weather maps and cloud cover photographs from 
around the world • Uses a standard communications receiver and 
computer printer m Futty automatic with manual over-ride • Built-in 
tuning indicator and timer & Powered by 12V B.C. supply 



SEE THE QFAX 

BOOTH 438 
DAYTON HAMVENTI0N 



Or AX Receiving Terminal 5399. OG ($8.00} 
QPRiiSir ink,..) Printe* S479.00 (S8.00J 



12 VolT hiwm Supply 
Parallel Cable 



£15.95 fSSJS} 
S2995 ,S?.r5} 



TtRMS ALi PRICES IN US DOLLARS | J SHIPPING A INSURANCE CWO. 



QUAY 



TECHNOLOGIES 



35 Stroughton Crescent, 
Munster Hamlet, Ontario, 
Canada, KOA 3P0 (613) 838-5254 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome -*»» 



IRON POWDER and FERRITE PRODUCTS 

AMIDGirNJ 



w* 



J-\ 




Fast, Reliable Service Since 1963 



II Orders Welcome 



Free 'Tech-Data' Flyer 



Toroidal Cores, Shielding Beads, Shielded Coil Forms 
Ferrite Rods, Pot Cores, Balurts, Etc. 

12033 OTSEGO STREET, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 91607 






* * 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 S3 



am not sure of its present call. 
73: What was your motivation to 
put up K6MYK? 

Gentry: This was a way of extend- 
ing the range of VHF. I've operat- 
ed VHF mobile since 1940 when I 
went on 1 12 MHz, and t ran very 
high power. . .a 35-T modulated 
oscillator. Receivers were all 
super-regeneratives. 

After World War II, when the 2- 
meier band was opened up, . . 
which I remember happening in 
January of f 46, 1 acquired an ARC- 
4, which I made into a crystal-con- 
trolled, 10- Watt transmitter and a 
tunable receiver. Many still re- 
member the old ARC-4 f T m sure. 

That was a mobile rig, and I can 
remember going to ML Wilson 
one time, I came on the air and it 
was like a foreign country showing 
up. I talked my lungs out going 
from one station to another as fast 
as I could for two hours! This 
pointed out the advantage of a 
high location, and I began looking 
for remote-controlled transmitter 
articles in amateur magazines. 
But, in the late p 40s and early '50s, 
all you could find was information 
on how to remotely control a trans- 
mitter. Nobody had ever thought 
in terms of a completely remote- 
controlled station. 
73: So you built one? 
Gentry: The marrying of a receiv- 
er and a transmitter took a lot of 
long hard work, It also meant a lot 
of spectrum separation along with 
a lot of tinkering and puttering to 
eliminate interference and desen- 
situation. In fact, one of the 
biggest problems with early re- 
peaters was if we had our receiv- 
ers on the low end of the band— as 
when we were receiving on 
145.08 MHz, which was a net fre- 
quency—then the transmitter had 
to be up near 147.70 MHz. Most of 
the people using the repeater had 
big beams and good receivers 
tuned to the low end. When they 
had to move their receivers up al- 
most 3 MHz to hear the repeater, 
they got into problems because 
their antennas were way out of 
their tuning range. That was as 
close as we could get in frequency 
with that era's state of the art. 

Later on, we built our own com- 
pletely new receiver that permit- 
ted less separation, Remember, 
you couldn't buy anything. Nor 
could you find information on how 
to do this. So, we were left to use 
our own ingenuity, We had to find 
ways of getting rejection of the 
transmitter on the receiver to elim- 
inate the problems. These things 
you could never find in print s but 
you were also too busy that there 



was not any time to write an arti- 
cle — mainly because so few peo- 
ple were interested, And besides, 
who would have published it? 
73: When you were experiment- 
ing and building back then, did 
you ever think that the interest in 
repeaters would grow to the pro- 
portions they have today? 
Gentry: I think I can say "yes" to 
that question. Yes. . .because my 
logic told me that this was a good 
way to get better communica- 
tions. If you can imagine a 10-Watt 
AM mobile running all over the 
greater Los Angeles area and 
never being out of communica- 
tions range with someone else, 
and you do this way back in the 
early '50s T then you have a pretty 
good idea of why I say that I had 
faith. There was something efse. I 
observed the growth of commer- 
cial two-way radio at elevated 
sites . . . and I knew it would even- 
tually happen with amateurs. I al- 
so knew that this would become a 
very widespread idea, and, with 
the adoption of FM, I knew it had 
to happen! 



that Howard Sheperd became the 
ARRL Director in this division. We 
tried through Howard to get the 
League to pick up the bit on re- 
peaters and get some rules 
changed because we had essen- 
tially no repeater rules, i wrote to 
Jon Griggs W6KW when he be- 
came Director requesting that he 
get the League to do something. 
This was about the ti me of the Don 
Miller lawsuit, and before the 
board of directors was a motion to 
develop "Advisory Committees." 
The Board voted for this. . .and 
this left an opening for Jon to 
make a motion to create a VHF 
Repeater Advisory Committees 
Jon then asked that I help him out- 
line how the committee should be 
formed. I was also one of the first 
members of that committee, 
73: In your opinion, why r after 
forming the VRAC T did it take the 
ARRL so many years to really get 
involved in VHF/UHF relay com- 
munication? 

Gentry: The League has tradition- 
ally been conservative, and from 
the standpoint of . . . let us say . . . 



"The pioneer spirit that came west is 
still here. It's in our basic attitudes. " 



As an aside, my personal com- 
munications went to FM in the ear- 
ly "60s, and I started full-time FM 
in my automobile in 1966. 
73: But, K6MYK was an AM re- 
peater and it remained AM for 
quite a long time, Why? 
Gentry: It remained AM because 
it served a great many people then 
using that mode. It was still "their 
repeater," if I may use the term. 
When the activity dropped to 
where there were no customers, 
then there was no sense keeping 
it on AM any longer. 

There was also a second factor. 
At the time, we knew that there 
would be new repeater rules com- 
ing out, and concurrent with that 
was the channelization of all 
bands in Southern California. We 
applied to SCRA and got a re- 
peater pair at that time, with the 
intention of going to FM. By the 
way, the repeater's control sys- 
tem has been FM since the begin- 
ning, and some of the original con- 
trol equipment is still in operation. 
73: There are now more than 300 
repeaters on 2 meters in Southern 
California, Did you expect this? 
Gentry: It's hard to say how far I 
expected it to go, because you 
can't really look ahead, but I 
would like to point out some histo- 
ry for you. I believe it was in 1967 



the best interest of the League, 
that is basically a good policy. We 
want to maintain what our League 
is, what it has been, what it stands 
for, and so on. You just cannot go 
out off the deep end every time 
something new comes along. I 
just don't think that back then 
there were enough people in the 
ARRL who were exposed to re- 
peaters, who understood the con- 
cept, and who knew what to do 
about it, Even before the days of 
repeaters, League officials would 
come out here and could not be- 
lieve the level of VHF activity, 
They thought it was a put-on, that 
everyone got on the air to make a 
big showing for them. They just 
didn't realize the use we were 
putting into VHF. 

73: If this is all true, and the early 
California repeater growth was as 
you say, then why did it take the 
rest of the nation over a decade to 
catch on that so many of these 
machines existed? 
Gentry: Let's put it this way. Take 
W6MEP,..the callsign that 
K6MYK uses these days, It's cur- 
rently located about 5,600' above 
sea level. But even in the early 
days, there were probably 5 to 7 
million people tt could reach. To- 
day, that's probably closer to 20 
million. I doubt if very many other 



repeaters serve a larger popula- 
tion group than those out here in 
the major California cities. 

Now, California has a very un- 
usual geography. It has lots of ele- 
vated sites, The early people who 
got into 2-meter repeaters were, 
for the most part, the people in 
commercial radio. They got into 
the business because the concept 
interested them, not so much at 
first as repeaters but as remote 
bases. They'd be controlled over 
teiephone lines. It took only a few 
sharpies to find out that they could 
couple a receiver to a transmitter, 
and this brought on tremendous 
area growth. Also, there were peo- 
ple .. . hams living at elevated lo- 
cations and wanting out of the 
hassle of the lower frequencies. 
They found that they could rag- 
chew for hours on 2 meters with- 
out interference. 

Now, you remember that out 
here we have repeater sites with 
line-of-stght coverage for several 
hundred miles. You go back 
East ... in the plains or coastal ar- 
eas, and if you can get to a height 
of 500', you are doing well In New 
York City, they have places you 
can get up maybe 1,000', but look 
what you have to contend with, 
The concrete canyons are one of 
the worst things in the world to try 
and get signals in and out of. 
Then, too, the West has always 
been known for its innovative- 
ness. It was a big, wide open 
country, and people had many 
generations out here where it was 
up to the individual to get out and 
do something. That same spirit 
has shown itself in amateur radio. 
To be innovators. To be pioneers. 
The pioneer spirit that came west 
is still here. It's in our basic atti- 
tudes. A lot of people like you who 
came out here from the East have 
adopted this philosophy because 
you like that attitude and that spir- 
it. You must remember that early 
television was spawned out here 
in parallel with the East, and it de- 
veloped very rapidly once there 
was a chance for it to get a start. 

I can remember when we used 
to swear at the Don Lee Broad- 
casting system because its third 
harmonic fell right in the middle of 
the 2-meter band. Ironically, as 
K6MYK and then WR6ABN, my 
repeater also operated from the 
original Don Lee broadcast site. 
That's also a bit of history, 

And It's, a hit of history that will 
have to wait until next month. For 
now, 73 from those of us who work 
and write the fate shift from Los 
Angetes, M 



84 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



Style W 





Style X 



t 



Style V 





Reverse 



QSLs 



Now you can get the highest quality QSL cards without 
spending a fortune! We put these cards on our press as filler 
between jobs; it gives the pressmen something to do and 
lets us print QSLs for you at an absurdly low price. 
Not that we skimp: All three styles are produced on heavy, 
glossy stock, in two colors [blue globe or satellite with black 
type]. At these prices, you can start the new year out right 
by QSLing all those disappointed hams who've been wait- 
ing for your card. Tell 'em the card was printed by Wayne! 



The World gJSSS? $5.00 





Yes, places you've never even heard of! Nearly 400 DX countries 
gleaned from the Awards Lists of dozens of IARU members— more 
countries than any other map available anywhere! ARRL J s DXCC 
m&p doesn't even come close I 

73 Magazine offers readers our DX Map of the World for the 
absurdly low price of only $5.00, shipping and handling included, 

Your ham shack will be incomplete without this giant, 950- 
square-inch, up-to-date map. It's printed in classic black and 
white, permitting you to color the countries in after you've QSL'd 
them. 

Save yourself the humiliation of never having heard of McDon- 
ald Island (what's the prefix?), jan May en (prefix?| or Kure Island 

(prefix?), Order now.... 



Code Tapes 

We've had so many phone calls from 
people wanting our famous 73 code 
tapes that we've decided to bring 
them back! 



Genesis 



5 wpm-This is the beginning tape, tak- 
ing you through the 26 letters, 10 num- 
bers and necessary punctuation, com- 
plete with practice every step of the 
way. The ease of learning gives confi- 
dence even to the faint of heart, 



"The Stickier 



6+ wpm-This is the practice tape for 
those who survived the 5 wpm tape, 
and it's also the tape for the Novice and 
Technician licenses. It is comprised of 
one solid hour of code. Characters are 
sent at 13 wpm and spaced at 5 wpm. 
Code groups are entirely random char- 
acters sent in groups of five— definitely 
not memorizable! 



Back Breaker" 



13-h wpm-Code groups again, at a 
brisk 13+ wpm so you'll be really at 
ease when you sit down in front of a 
steely-eyed volunteer examiner who 
starts sending you plain language at on- 
ly 13 per. You'll need this extra margin 
to overcome the sheer panic universal 
in most test situations. You've come 
this far, so don't get code shy now! 



"Courageous" 



20+ wpm-Congratulations! Okay, the 
challenge of code is what's gotten you 
this far, so don't quit now, Go for the 
Extra class license. We send the code 
faster than 20 per. It's like wearing lead 
weights on your feet when you run; 
you'll wonder why the examiner is 
sending so slowly! 



$la4&ifr&' From 73s Library 



m The Magic of Ham Radio t by Jerold Swank W8HXR, begins with a brief history of amateur radio 
and Jerry's involvement in it. Part 2 details many of ham radio's heroic moments. Hamdons close ties 
with the continent of Antarctica are the subject of Part 3. In Part 4 the strange and humorous sides of 
ham life get their due. And what of the future? Part 5 peers into the crystal ball. Only $4.95. 

*The Contest Cookbook , by Bill Zachary N60P, One of ham radio's w inn ingest contests rs lets you 
in on the tips and techniques of the Big Guns. You'll learn which duping method to use, find out what 
equipment you'll need, and discover the secret of building a pileup. includes separate chapters on DX 
and domestic contests. $5.95 while they last! 



QSL CardS Style; 

Quantity: 



□ w nx 

□ 100 
D250 

□ 500 
Postage and 



□ Y 

$8.97 
$19.97 
$39.97 
Handling 



$1.00 



Books 



The Magic of Ham Radio 
The Contest Cookbook 
Postage and 



$4.95 

$5.95 

Handling 



$1.00 



Code Tapes 

Genesis 
The Stickier 
Back Breaker 
Courageous 



$6.95 
$6.95 
$6.95 
$6.95 
Postage and Handling 



$1.00 



Giant DX Map of the World 



$5.00 



Please print! 

Name 

Address 

City_ 



Total Enclosed 



Call 



State 



DAE 



□ MC 



D VISA 



Card* 



Zip 

D Check/MO 
Exp* Date 



ORDER FORM 



Mall your order to 73 Magazine, WGE Center, Peterborough NH 03458, 

Attn: Uncle Wayne. "QSL orders: Altow 4^6 weeks for tfeliuery.'' 



1 

I 

I 
I 

I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio ♦ April. 1987 65 




EATHERSAT 



Dr. Ralph E. Taggart WB8DQT 
602 S. Jefferson 
Mason Mi 48854 

TIMEBASES 

Way back in the December 
column, I promised to talk about 
timebase circuits and then pro* 
ceeded to get sidetracked. This 
month I will get back to timebases, 
if only to avoid piling up too many 
unrealized promises! 

All of the direct-broadcast 
weather satellites that most of 
us are likely to be interested in 
transmit video at either 240 lines 
per minute (Ipm) or 120 Ipm. The 
former includes the WEFAX trans- 
missions from the U.S, GOES, 
European METEOSAT, and Jap- 
anese GMS geostationary sat- 
ellites; single mode (either visible 
or IR display) from the ILS. 
TIROS/NOAA polar orbiters; and 
advanced Soviet METEOR/COS- 
MOS transmissions. The 120-lpm 
rate is used for display of the 
''standard" Soviet METEOR im- 
agery and simultaneous display of 
visible and IR data from the U.S. 
TIROS/NOAA spacecraft. 

If you are going to display the 
pictures on FAX t you will probably 
be using a 240-rpm or 120-rpm 
synchronous drum or helix motor 
(or some other synchronous 
speed with suitable gearing to get 
the same end result). If you want 
to use a siow-scan-type CRT dis- 
play, you will want to trigger your 
horizontal display at either 4 Hz 
(240/60) or 2 Hz (120/60). 

Some approaches to scan con- 
version also use the equivalent of 
such fine trigger pulses to estab- 
lish timing for the loading of image 
lines to the computer or display 
memory. Other scan converter 
designs (such as the one in Chap- 
ter 10 of the WSH} use hardware 
clocks to pace the loading of indi- 
vidual pixels into memory and as 
the basis for line delays that 
are essential to the operation 
of almost any scan conversion 
software. 

The point is, no matter how you 
plan to display pictures, it requires 
some pretty accurate clocks in or- 
der to keep your display in syn- 
chronization with the incoming 
satellite video, All the various 
satellite video sources have their 
line rates locked to crystal-con- 
trolled standards, so proper dis- 
play of s 1ive Jt pictures, directly 



from the receiver, requires similar 
accuracy on the part of the dis- 
play timebase if you are to keep 
in step. 

You might have a 240-rpm, 1 1 0- 
V, 60-Hz synchronous motor run- 
ning your FAX drum for WEFAX 
display, for example, but it would 
never do to run that motor off the 
ac mains. Most of us are aware 
that the long-term accuracy of 60- 
Hz ac is pretty good; after all, we 
do run ail those wail clocks from 
just such a source. 

Unfortunately, while long-term 
accuracy is good, short-term ac- 
curacy may be quite variable. Any 
frequency excursions from pre- 
cisely 60 Hz during the minutes of 
image display will cause the motor 
to run slightly faster or slower than 
the rated 240 rprn, and that will 
throw off image sync, Simitar 
problems arise with any other 
timebase for CRT or scan-con- 
verter display. 

Most operators would also like 
to be able to tape-record satellite 
images for later playback and dis- 
play, but that introduces a whole 
range of new problems. Even the 
best stereo tape deck will have 
some short-term variability in 
recording and playback speeds. 
(You can see the magnitude of 
these in the wow and flutter speci- 
fications.) Speed changes during 
recording or playback result in 
changes in the rate of the video 
data, so while crystal -con trolled 
frequency standards will handle 




J Mive' display, they can pro- 
vide no direct help for recorded 
display. 

You can get around this prob- 
lem rather neatly by using a crys- 
tal-referenced source for display 
and using the same system to 
generate a cbck signal or refer- 
ence tone. The satellite signal can 
be recorded on one stereo chan- 
nel, while the reference tone is 
recorded on the other. During 
playback, the reference tone is 
used in conjunction with a phase- 
locked loop (PLL) to lock the dis- 
play timing to the recorded refer* 
encetone. 

Tape speed will certainly vary 
during both the recording and 
playback process, but now the 
display timing will "track" such 
variations, giving you a solid 
display provided your initial ref- 
erence tone was produced with 
sufficient accuracy! Let's look at 
some of the possible approach- 
es for crystal-referenced time- 
bases, including the needed 
reference tones for recorded 
displayl 

Subcarrier Lock 

One of the neat aspects of U.S. 
weather sateflites (and the more 
advanced Soviet METEOR/COS- 
MOS spacecraft) is that the 2,400- 
Hz audio subcarrier (which is am- 
plitude modulated to produce the 
video signal) is typically locked to 
or of comparable accuracy to the 
timebases used to generate the 
video timing. This means that the 
satellite subcarrier itself can be 
used as the master time reference 
for image display, 

If you digitally divide the 2,400- 
Hz subcarrier signal by 600 (a di- 



,- 






... 







• ' •■-• •' •■■• 



Photo A. An example of a visible 
frequency that is off. 



fight NOAA FAX print with a clock 



vide-by-six stage followed by two 
divide-by-ten stages), you would 
have an accurate 4-Hz fine pulse. 
Divide the signal by 1 ,200 (substi- 
tute a divide-by-12 for the divide- 
by-six stage in the preceding ex- 
ample) to get an equally accurate 
2-Hz signal! Need an accurate 
source of 60 Hz for your drum mo- 
tor? Simply divide the 2,400-Hz 
signal by 40 (divide by four and 
then divide by ten) and you are in 
business! 

Of course, things are never 
quite that simple; you cannot sim- 
ply feed the AM 2,400-Hz subcar- 
rier into a TTL or CMOS divider 
chain, but it can be almost that 
easy with the circuit shown in Fig. 
1 (a). This is a PLL tone decoder 
with a sample of the 2,400-Hz sub- 
carrier applied at the input. 

With the proper component val- 
ues shown in Table 1 , this chip will 
lock to the 2 P 400-Hz tone and the 
out signal will be a nice square- 
wave sample of the PLL 2,400-Hz 
vottage-controlled-oscillator (vco) 
signal. This square-wave signal 
can be divided to yield any of your 
needed display frequencies! 

An advantage of this circuit over 
a PLL such as the 565 is that the 
567 has an internal control tran- 
sistor that will light the lock led 
when the chip is properly locked 
to the input signal. With a 2,400- 
Hz subcarrier at the input, the vco 
pot is simply adjusted until the 
lock indicator stays on with signal 
modulation. 

A major advantage of the sub- 
carrier lock approach is that the 
satellite signal itself is your refer- 
ence tone so you need only a 
monaural recorder or a single 
stereo channel for recording- 
Recorder speed variations will be 
reflected in changes in the 2,400- 
Hz subcarrier frequency, but 
these small shifts will be tracked 
by the PLL in the 567 and your 
timing will stay in step, 

Subcarrier lock is extremely 
popular for those just getting into 
satellite display because if is quite 
simple, but it is not without its 
drawbacks. In order to maintain 
sync, the system must stay locked 
to the satellite subcarrier signal. 

This can become impossible 
during a deep fade in a polar-orbit 
pass or during a burst of intermod 
or other interference, and il also 
becomes a problem during occa- 
sional episodes on GOES where 
the WEFAX modulation becomes 
misadjusted, causing the subcar- 
rier to drop to 0% amplitude on 
black instead of 4%. The tech- 
nique also doesn't work with most 
120-lpm Soviet METEOR space- 



86 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



IF YOU NEED $5,000. . .$20,000 EVEN UP TO $500,000 TO 

START A NEW BUSINESS OR TO EXPAND AN EXISTING 

FIRM — THEN READ WHY YOU TOO WILL CALL THIS 

INCREDIBLE MONEY RAISING 



3 J 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY SEEKERS' LOANS MANUAL 

"The Small Business Borrower's Bible 

Practically prepares the loan application for you line -by-line.. .the ^proper" way. 
All properly prepared applications are processed faster^.no red tape! 



* * # 



EVERY 

LOAN DOLLAR 

YOU GET 

YOU KEEP 

AND USE TO 

OPERATE 

YOUR BUSINESS 



Guaranteed Loans.. .Direct Loans-.and Immediate Loans are available now! 

Most men and women seriously tnteresied in starting then own business are eligible lo apply — including those who already own a business and need 
capital lasl for expansiorr.or to stay afloat, .even if they've been flatly refused by banks and turned down elsewhere* Yet. too many never quality, simply 
because they do not know how to "properly" prepare the loan application... 



In order to help [hose people 
applying for these quaranieed and 
direct loans fill oui their Joan appli- 
cations I he '"right way" our business 
researchers, with their diligent com- 
pilation and effective efforts, have 
successfully assembled and pub- 
lished a comprehensive, easy-to- 
follow seminar manual : The Business 
Opportunity Seekers Loans ManuaJ, 
that will quickly show you practically 
everything you'll need to know to prepare 
a loan apphcation to get federally 
Guarameed and Qirect Loans. 

Hare are jusl tome of ihfl many 
Important benefit* the Business 
Opportunity Seekers' Loans Manual 
provides you with 

* a completely Ml l*d in t ample *el 
of actual SB A loan application 
lormt. all properly tilled in tor 
you I o *a ti l y 1 oJ I o w — aid* y oti i n 
quickly preparing your own 
loan application the right way. 
Each lint on the sample appli- 
cation iqrmi it explained and 
tILuitralcd in aeay-lo-undcr- 
stand language. 

* tait application preparation 
procedure* tor getting leant tor 
bolh new atari up busineit 
renfurti and eitaoHihed firmi. 

* advlaes you on how to properly 
answer key queftioni necei- 
tary far loan approval and in 
order lo help avoid having your 
application turned down— gives 
you advice on what you should 
not do under any c i re urn ■ lance* 

* what simple sleps you lake to 
guarantee eligibility — no matter 
if you do not presently quality, 

* where you can I He your appli- 
cation tor laslest processing. 
Al lh»s point the most jmporiant 

question you want answered is 
Ju5l where «s all this loan money 
coming trom^ Incredible as il may 
sound— these Guaranteed Loans 

Direcl loans and Immediate 
Loans are indeed available right 
now — from rne best, and yet the 
most over Footed and irequently 
the most ignored and somehmes 
outright ridiculed made-lun-Qf 
source ol ready money !asl 
capital, m America — THE 
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Ot course there are tnose who 
upon hearing [he words UHlTEQ 
STATES GOVERNMENT will 
mslaniiy rrrje^e up and frown and 
say 

oniy minorities can get srnkSt 
business toan money from the 
government!" 

Yet on l he other hand {and most 
puzzling) others will rant on and on 
and on lhal 

" don't even try* it's just impos- 
sible — att those Business Loans 
Programs are strictly for the Chryslers, 
the Lockheeds, the big corpora- 
tions, not for the tittle guy or smalt 
companies" etc. 



irf*- 



Stfil mere are (hose *no 

declare 

I need mone y rtghf n ow aid 
small business QOv&mm&nt 104ns 
lake too darn long it's tmposstute 
togusttfy No one ever gets one ot 
those loans 

Or you may hear these 
communis 

My accountant s tumor 
assistant says he thinks if mtghi be 
a waste o4 my time*' Hec*. there's 
too much worrisome paperwork 
and red tape to wade through." 

Frankly — such ranjings and 
ravings are just a lot ol "bulf" 
without any real basis — and only 
serve to clearly show that iack ol 
knowledge . misinformation 
and no! quite lully understanding 
the UNITED STATES GOVERN- 
MENTS Small Business Adminis- 
tration^ (SBA) Programs ha«e 
unfortunately caused a lot ot 
people to ignore what 1$ without a 
doubl — not only the most 
important and generous source ol 
financing, for new business start 
ups and existing business 
expansions in this country — bui 
Of the en ft re world 1 

Now that you've neard the"buir 
about the United States Govern- 
ment's SBA Loan Program — ta^e 
a lew more moments and read Ihe 
following facts 

• Only 9.G% of Approved loam 
were actually made to minor it #t 
lafi year 

• Whet SBA recognizes « a 
"imall buiinflii" actually 
appi'le* to 97% ot all the 
compenlet In the nation 

• Red tape com*i about only 
when the loan application If 
lent back rju# lo applicant not 
providing the requested infor- 
mal ion.,. Or providing the wrong 
information 

• The SBA it required by 
Congress to provide a minimum 
dollar amount in business loans 
each fiical year in order lo law- 
fully comply with itrlcl quotst- 
(Almosl 5 billion thii year) 

Vet. despite Ihe mil Irons who 
miss oui — mere are slit* literally 
thousands of ambitious men and 
women nationwide who are prop- 
erly applying — being approved 
— and obtaining sufficient funds 
to either start a new business a 
franchise or buy oui or expandan 
existing one Mostly they are all 
lust lypica' Americans with no 
fancy titles who used essentially 
The lime effective know-how lo 
Ml out their apphcaho^s that you 11 
hnd in the Business Opportunity 
Seekers' Loans Manual 

So don t you dare be shy about 
applying lor and accepting these 
guaranteed and direct government 
loans Curiously er>ougn the 
government is actually w *ry m uch 



e 
a 
a 



* 
a 



GUARANTEE #1 

Simply - look Over fn*s most 
effeclive money raising, loan 
preparation assistance manual 
for 15 days — and tnen if you 
are not convinced that m can 
actually help you obtain the 
Business Loan you need nght 
away just return it for a 'uii 
and prompt *elund 



a 
a 



* a 



»eee**«*ce*eeea*ee 

GUARANTEE #2 

Even afiftp 15 days - here 5 hem 
you are sMi strongly protected 
it you deode 10 keep the 
manual - and vdu apply 1o* a" 
SBA Loan anyiime Withm 1 
year your loan musr be 

appft.^ed and you. must actually 
receive the funds Or yOur money 
wHi t>e refunded m fu'i 



a 
a 
a 



interested m helping you start a 

business mat wtlf make a [Ol 0' 
money It's to their advantage — 
ihe more money you make tne 
more they srano to collect m taxes 
m liscal tflflfi, our nation's good old 
generous "uncle" will eiiner lend 
directly or guarantee billions of 
dollar* m loan requests, along witn 
technical assistance and even 
sales procurement assistance 
Remember. If you don't apply tor 
these available SBA funds 
somebody etsa certainly wltL 

Don't lose out — now is the best 
time to place your order tor Ihis 
comprehensive manual IE is not 
■old in itores, Available onty by 
mail through this ad. directly hem 
Financial Freedom Co.. the ex- 
clusive publisher, al just a small 
frachon ol what it would cost tor 
the services of a private loan 
advisor or loaltend a semrnar. 
For example: 

tmiiafly this amaung Guaran- 
teed a n d D tree i Loans Man u at was 
spec tatty oesrgned to be the basts 
of a Smati &vsmess Loan Seminar 
— where each registrant woutd 
pay an admits ton tee of $450 But 
our company te'f thai smce tne 
manual's quatity instructions were 
so mxcmptionmtty cryitat-clttar rhar 
ar\yone wno couto reati coulo 
tuccttttuity utm it* techniques 
without having to attend a seminar 
C pay for costly private loan 
advisory as i 1 stance jervrces 

Therefore, for those purcnasin-g 
[he manual by mail, no 3 day c^ass 
no course and accommodahons 
are required And ralher 5han $450 
we couJd stash the pvice ail ine 
way down to just a mere ££Q — a 
small ponnon of a typrcai serflmar 
attendance fee - providing you 
promptly fill in and majl coupon 
below with fee- whrle !his special 
"■seminar-m-print" manual offer is 
stNi available by maH at this reia- 
hvely low price 1 

Remember, ims most unique 
manual quickly provides you witn 
actual sample copies of SQA Loan 

application and alf other required 
fqrms— already properly Infled *fl 
'or you to easily use as reiiaoiy 
accurals step-by-step guides — 
thus oMenng yo u compJete 
assurance mat your application 
will be properly prepared ano 
tnereby immediatefy puttmg you 
on ihe ngni road to obtaining fast 
no --ec-Tape loan approval 



Only because we ate so confi- 
dant mat this is a tact do we dare 
make such a strong bindingi 
seidom-heard-oi Double 
Guarantee No stronger 
guarantee poaiioJeF 



Of course, no one can guarantee 
lhal every request will be ap- 
proved — but clearly we are firmly con 
vinced lhat any sound business re- 
quest properly prepared— showing a 
reasonable chance o* repayment and 
submitted lo SBA — wrtl be approved 

THOUSANDS ARE 

PROPERLY APPLYING 

AND BEING APPROVED. 

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE 

TO JOIN THEM! 



GUARANTEED YOUR LOAN MUST BE APPROVED . . , OR MONEY BACK — ONLY A 
SMALL PRICE TO PAY FOR THE LOAN YOU CAN GET ... NO RISK AND NO HASSLES, 



FREE BONUS 

tt you order your manual 
today you'll receive a valuable 
treasury ol fas! easy low- 
capita) and highly profitable 
business programs worth lorly- 
five dollars — yours abso- 
lutely free h 



tQQ% li x deductible as ,» 
business expenae. Don'1 delay — 
ordw your copy today! 
NO RISK LOAN O-PPQHTUHTTY FOAM 



Deiach and rush lor 

COMPLETE PREPArfATrOM 

ASSISTANCE FOfl LOAN APPROVAL 



Please rush me 



copies ol 



Business Opportunity Seekers' 
Loans Manual" each at a $20 fee 
plus $3.00 handling and shipping. 
I am fully protected by the \wo strong 
guarantees above. I'm ordering today 
- so I can receive FREE - the valuable 
treasury ol fast, easy, low-capita* and 
highly profitable business programs 

. . worth tony-live dollars - mine free 
to keep even if I decide to return ihe 
manual for a full refund 

Enclosed is Fult Payment 
Cash Check Money Order 
Send payment with order. 

Name 

Please Print Clearly 
Address 



City 



.Zip 



Stale 

MAIL TO: 

Financial Freedom Publishers 
tlO W, 5th St. Dept. AR 1 
Winston Salem, NC 27101 



©19B5 




"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 87 



-5'/ 



■> r 



uemic Cxesffe) 



+Sv 



+5* 



\£Q 



DC'D 



■ |mf 



IM 



J_ 



KE^UT 



JT 1 






4| 




OU1 



44o» 



5 f 



•*$& — l 



7 



v'CO 

3^ 







s 



*TO-D 




i 



Lh=- 






m 






:>L-Mj 



3 # TUNC 



^ 



F/g. f , ^ A PLL tone decoder; (b) the active bandpass filter; (c) precision 60-Hz source. 



craft, whose line rate is not locked 
to the subcarrier frequency. 

Usually the first upgrade of a 
subcarrier-iocked station is to 
build a 2.4-MHz crystal oscillator 
and divide the signal by 1 ,000 to 
produce a steady 2,400-Hz tone 
for locking up the display. This is a 
major improvement but does re- 
quire a stereo tape system (video 
on one channel, 2,400-Hz tone on 
the other). It is also not terribly 
convenient since 2.4-MHz crys- 
tals are special-order items and 
three divide-by-ten chips are re- 
quired. 

If you go this route, the 2,400- 
Hz square wave from the final di- 
vider should be routed through a 
bandpass filter— Fig. 1(b)— to 
convert it to a sine wave for better 
recording response. (Use the 
2,400-Hz values from Table 1 .) 

Some cassette recorders may 
have a problem with this approach 
due to the fact that the left and 
right channels are adjacent to one 
another on the tape and quite 
close together. The problem is a 
beating of the two 2,400-Hz sig- 
nals, as well as possible degrada- 
tion of the black level on the video 
channel due to 2,400-Hz refer- 
ence tone feedth rough. 

In summary, I would recom- 
mend the direct subcarrier lock 
only if extreme economy were the 
object. If you designed around 
this approach initially, upgrading 
later to a 2.4-MHz/2,400-Hz sys- 
tem would be highly desirable 
whenever you could manage it. 
Given the versatility of today's dig- 
ital circuits, there are better ap- 
proaches to use right from the be- 
ginning that will actually result in a 
simpler system in the long run! 

FAX Timebases 

As noted earlier, the typical FAX 
system uses a 60-Hz synchronous 
motor that requires a precision 
source of 60 Hz ac at 1 1 0-1 20 V. 
The 1 10-120-V part is fairly easy, 
and a reliable power amplifier to 
run the drum is shown in the 

88 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



WSH. What is needed is a precise 
source for the 60 Hz to feed the 
amplifier. 

You could get it from the sub- 
carrier (see earlier discussion) or 
you could use a 6-MHz oscillator 
(crystal-controlled) followed by a 
division of 100,000 (five decade 
counters), but either approach is 
unnecessarily complicated. The 
circuit in Fig. 1(c) will do the same 
job with a single chip and a univer- 
sally available color-burst crystal! 

The 60-Hz output of this circuit 
is a square wave. That is not suit- 
able for either drum motor amplifi- 
cation or recording, so this stage 
should be followed by the band- 
pass filter in Fig. 1(c) to produce a 
60-Hz sine wave. (Use the 60-Hz 
component values from Table 1 .) 
RT in Fig. 1(c) should be a pot 
adjusted for maximum voltage out 
of this stage with 60 Hz at the in- 
put. A similar stage should be 
used even if you use the subcarri- 
er/crystal 2,400-Hz option. 

For recorded operation, the 
sine-wave output from the band- 
pass filter can be routed to the 
reference channel of the tape sys- 
tem, which can be used to drive 



the drum amplifier on playback. 
There are several ways that the 
drum speed can be altered to 
provide for phasing in a system of 
this sort. A relay can be used to 
lower the drum amplifier drive lev* 
el, dropping the drum out of lock, 
or a second oscillator can be used 
with a 4-MHz crystal with digital 
switching of the two sources for 
phasing. The fatter approach is 
used in the WSH FAX recorder, 

CRT/Scan Converter Timing 

I have already noted how the 
direct lock and 2,400-Hz refer- 
ence tone systems can be used to 
generate either 4-Hz or 2-Hz line 
trigger or scan converter timing 
pulses, but there is a much sim- 
pler way to accomplish the same 
task. A crystal-controlled oscilla- 
tor can be operated at a frequency 
of 4.194304 MHz; the crystal is 
available from most parts houses 
for microprocessor use. 

This frequency can be divided 
by 2,048 using a single CMOS 
chip such as the 4020. The result 
is a 2,048-Hz reference tone using 
only two ICs (a 74LS0O oscillator 
and the 4020 divider), compared 





2,048/ 




Component 


2,400 Hz 


60 Hz 


Values for Fig. 1(a) 






CI 


2.2 mF 


20 mF 


C2 


4.7 mF 


10mF 


C3 


.1 mF 


+ 22mF 


Vco 


5k 


25k 


R1 


1,500 


75k 


Values for Fig. 1(b) 






C4,5 


.01 mF 


.1 mF 


Rl 


10k 


150k 


RT 


2,700 


2,500* 


RF 


20k 


330k 


* = series variable pot for f 


ine-tuning. 




pF caps = silver mica. 






Less than 1 mF = mylar. 






Greater then 1 mF = tantalum. 





Table t Component vaiues for Fig. 1, 



with four ICs (oscillator plus three 
decade counters) required for the 
2,400-Hz version. 

The same bandpass filter and 
PLL circuit used for 2,400 Hz will 
work with 2, 048 Hz, but this seem- 
ingJy oddball frequency is far 
more versatile than the 2,400-Hz 
version. Assuming you have 
2,048-Hz output from the PLL cir- 
cuit, a single 4020 divider can 
yield either 4 Hz {divide by 512) or 
2 Hz {divide by 1 ,024). You save a 
great many chips, the construc- 
tion is correspondingly simpler, 
power drain is lower, and the crys- 
tal is cheaper by a factor of at least 
five! This approach is used for the 
CRT ttmebase in the WSH project 
for just these reasons. 

Any system requiring a 4-Hz or 
2-Hz trigger or timing pulse will 
also require a single shot at the 
end of the timing chain to produce 
a relatively short pulse (typically 
1 0-1 5 ms) for timing or horizontal 
triggering purposes. The single 
shot output can also be fed back 
to a series of control gates to intro- 
duce a controlled time delay for 
either automatic or manual phas- 
ing, a subject covered in detail in 
the WSH, 

The versatility of the 2,048-Hz 
timebase also extends to other ap- 
proaches to scan converter tim- 
ing. The IVSHscan converter us- 
es the 2,048-Hz tone directly 
without the need for additional di- 
viders, single shots, or phase con- 
trol gates. This clock frequency 
will toggle 512 times in each 240- 
Ipm tine (1 ,024 times for 1 20 fpm), 
making it a simple software task to 
store 256, 51 2, or 1 ,024 pixel san> 
pies during each line. 

Precision phase delays in the 
ms range or extended time delays 
up to 32 seconds using a single 
1 6-bit register are possible by sim- 
ply counting 2,048-Hz lock transi- 
tions, greatly simplifying the scan 
converter timebase. By cheating 
unmercifully in the design of the 
WSH scan converter, the same 
reference crystal and divider 



The R.F. Connection 



. . 



SPECIALISTS IN RF CONNECTORS AND COAX" 



J! 












Ptsfi 








I 



J- 



ut,-- 



STUMOtit 4&**Tf ft 






— H 




MAE 







A04PTEH 




UGI-9SU Pl>3fiB 



— — 

U — 

TETAO*PTEN 
Lft?74BrU 













L .r«*ji.i4r 4ti*PTER 






MAKE THE CONNECTION 



n 






A|3*P11H 



M 







IS 








ril.'l C.HEVDJ'^.r. 
UG-C2MJ 



MQ**I 4NGtf Ow"f •* 








K 



HOOD 






ilfr2B5rt,J WITH UQ- lTbAl 
«FrK«3«G*D*P1EJJ 



HftiriA: l l 
UC1D9MI 



in, ft) 

ri 



//.y.'-v.v.v 



^HT 1 " 



ULlOTHVu 




[to 






CI 





liOQD 



JHdriTAMBU 



The R.F. Connection 

213 N. Frederick Ave., Suite 11, Gaithersburg, MD. 20877 

301-840-5477 



**280 




Amateur, Business 
Marine, and SWL 

Major Credit Cards 
— We ship UPS — 

Most Major Brands 
— Sales & Service — 

WE STOCK 

Radios, Ant, Books 
and Accessories 

ICOM, Kenwood, Yaesu 
and Many More!! 

Call For Prices 



^ 162 



28360 South River Road 
Ml. Clemens, Ml 48045 



Sun , Mon — Closed 

Tue , wed— 10-6 

Thurs^Fn.— 10-9 

Sat.— 1 0-4 



HAM-COM 1987 

& 
ARRL 





CONVENTION 

JUNE 5, 6 & 7 1987 

ARLINGTON CONVENTION CENTER 

ARLINGTON, TEXAS 



Exhibitor Info: (214) 521-9430 
Registration Into: (214) 423-3498 




■When You Buy. Say 73' 



73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 89 



chain can be used for display tim- 
ing as well! Such tricks are one of 
the primary reasons that the entire 
WSH scan converter circuit, in- 
cluding all satellite video, time- 
base, computer interface, and TV 
display circuits require only 1 3 IGs 
with a total component cost of 
about $60! 

Timebase Adjustment 

If a timebase is to do its job, it 
must be operating at just the right 
frequency. As you shall see in a 
moment, close is not good 
enough. The principal virtue of the 
direct subcarner lock approach, 
aside from simplicity, is that the 
only adjustment to be made is ad- 
justing the PLL for lock on the 
subcarrier, Ail of the other ap- 
proaches require that a crystal os- 
cillator be trimmed to a precise 
frequency There are three ways 
to do this. 

The first and most obvious ap- 
proach is to use a frequency coun- 
ter on the oscillator in question 
and adjust the relevant trimmer 
capacitor for the proper frequen* 
cy. Don't bother with this one un- 
less you are sure about the abso- 
lute calibration of your counter, If 
you are a few hundred Hz off in the 
2-5-MHz range, you will get unac- 
ceptable results! 

Your run-of-the-mill counter can 
be used, however, ff you first ex- 
amine the results of a live printout 
or display. The geometry of the 
display can give you all the infor- 
mation you need to get the oscilla- 
tor on frequency regardless of the 
calibration of your counter. 

Photo A is an example of a visi- 
ble-light NOAA FAX print I re- 



1 April 1987 


NOAA-9 


NOAA-10 


11844 


2778 


0054.19 


0102.14 


147,59 


82 33 


102.0638 


101.2979 


137.62 


137.50 



Date 

Spacecraft 

Orbit Number 

Eq, Crossing Time (UTC) 

Longitude Asc. Mode (Deg. W.) 

Nodal Period (Min.) 

Frequency {MHz) 

These orbital parameters are projected two months in advance 
due to deadline considerations. Accumulated errors due to un- 
compensated orbital decay and other anomalies result in expec- 
tation of errors up to two minutes and possibly as many degrees 
in terms of the crossing data and possible small changes in the 
indicated period. Users requiring precision tracking data should 
rely on more current sources. 



Table 2. TIROS/NOAA orbital predict data 



ceived in the mail with an under- 
standable "What's wrong?" 
query. What is wrong is that the 
clock frequency is off; but the 
question is, by how much? 

Note that the readout is pro- 
gressively offset to the left from its 
initial starting position at the top. 
This indicates that the clock fre- 
quency is LOW. If the tilt had been 
to the right, the frequency would 
have been HIGH. Had the image 
been precisely vertical, the fre- 
quency would be right on (see the 
third option below), but then I nev- 
er would have gotten the letter! 
OK t it's low in frequency. Now 
let's find out how low! 

Using the trailing edge of the 
sync pulse, together with the 
minute markers (white horizon- 
tal lines in the pre-earth space 
scan), you start by physically 
measuring the offset over a 
specific time interval. In this 
case, the offset totals 14 mm 
(measured from the original print) 



over a period of 4 minutes. 

Since the print width is 142 mm, 
the total offset error accumulated 
over 4 minutes is 9.86%— (14/ 
142) x 100. Each line is 250 ms 
long, making the accumulated 
time error 250 x 0,0986, or 24.65 
ms t over 4 minutes. Since 4 min- 
utes is 240 seconds, you have an 
error of 24 65 ms/240 seconds, or 
0,102 ms each second. This may 
not seem tike much of an error, 
but it represents 001%— (0.102/ 
1 ,000) x 1 00. 

This particular recorder was us- 
ing the circuit in Fig. 1(c) as the 
timebase, so the 0.01% frequen- 
cy error represents 368 Hz— 
0.0001 x 3,679,545. You already 
knew that the frequency was low, 
so In this case you want to raise 
the clock frequency by 368 Hz, 

Now comes the reason for all 
this calculator punching. No mat- 
ter how wolf or poorly your counter 
is calibrated, simply hook it to the 
TUNE point in the circuit, note 



whatever reading you get, and 
then adjust the trimmer until it is 
higher by 368 Hz! This technique 
can be used with any display as 
long as you can measure the off- 
set error over a known time peri- 
od. All this requires is counter res- 
olution, not precision calibration, 
since you are making a relative 
frequency adjustment. 

The. final approach, to be used 
if you have no counter but plenty 
of patience, is to make very smatf 
adjustments in your trimmer while 
looking at the results of live 
printouts or displays with each 
change. The goal is to get the 
printout precisely vertical which 
means that everything is on fre- 
quency! 

You must use live transmis- 
sions for each run since a record- 
ing will always preserve any error 
that was present when I he record- 
ing was made and what you really 
want to do is check each adjust* 
men! against a live reference sig- 
nal. Once properly adjusted, your 
recordings will also come out cor- 
rectly since the reference fre- 
quency is now on the money! 

Well, I have thoroughly run oul 
of space this month, but at least t 
have made good on an introduc- 
tion to timebases. Next month, I 
will look at the many aspects of 
image resolution, an often misun- 
derstood subject! 

Note 

References to WSH refer to the 
third edition of the Weather Satel- 
lite Handbook, available from 
yours truly for $12,50 plus $1 ship- 
ping in the U.S. and $2 else- 
where. ■ 




BOVE AND BEYOND 



Peter H. Putman KT2B 

84 Burnham Road 
Morris Plains NJ 0795O 

JANUARY SWEEPSTAKES 

Funny, isn't it. Here \ was, all set 
to tell you about my latest esca- 
pade up a snow-covered Catskill 
peak in a rare grid square during 
the January VHF Sweepstakes, 
carrying complete stations for 
144 t 220, 432. 902. and 1 296 MHz 
to make countless operators hap- 
py by giving out contacts from 
FN22. There would be the usual 
photos showing the trek up the 
mountain, setting up. and spec- 
tacular vistas in the background, 



while I was furiously logging con- 
tacts at one per minute. 

What I am actually going to tell 
you about is a difficult three-hour 
trip up a two-mile road into 60* 
mph winds and a -30 a wind chilL 
the almost total destruction of my 
F9FT432 yagi, snow blowing into 
everything, one lousy contact on 
220 MHz FM, and a fast retreat to 
(of all things) a nearby UHF-TV 
transmitter site to warm up and 
then hitch a fast ride down the hill 
on a Snowcat accompanying one 
of the crew after a minor accident. 

Overlook Mountain (elevation 
3,150 ASL) is about 10 mifes 
northwest of Kingston. New York. 



It is an excellent VHF location and 
sits right on the southern edge of 
grid square FN22, with a com- 
manding shot to the north, east, 
south, and southwest Only the 
paths from 270 degrees to 360 de- 
grees are difficult. It is just north of 
the legendary "activity corridor* 1 
that runs from Boston to Washing- 
ton and lies close to several major 
population centers with lots of 
VHF activity. 

What better time to put it on 
the air than during the January 
Sweepstakes? The mountain's 
usual occupants, John Lindholm 
W1XX and crew, had announced 
their intention to travel west to 
FN01 in western Pennsylvania in- 
stead, and I couldn't resist the 
temptation Stations were quickly 
assembled for 144. 220, 432. and 
1296 MHz, using the notorious 
TB-9000 as both transceiver on 2 



meters and transverter exciter for 
the higher bands. I selected the 
IC-3AT for 220 FM, and Hans Pe- 
ters VE3CRU sent along a review 
model of the new SSB LT33S 902- 
MHz transverter to take along. 

Antennas were the trusty 19-el- 
ement 432 F9FT, the 23-element 
1296 F9FT, and a new 16-element 
902 F9FT. In addition, Ivars 
Lauzums KC2PX provided one of 
the new 9-element portable 144- 
MHz F9FT antennas, wherein the 
elements collapse against the 
boom for transportation. This 
made for a neat package. I tned a 
radical idea with coax feedltnes: 
Everything used RG-6/X ■mini-e'* 
to save weigh! and size. How 
much loss did I give up? About 3 
dB in the 1296 run. 2.5 dB at 902, 
and 1.5 dB at 432 MHz. These 
were figures I could easily deal 
with, since I could negate the loss- 



90 73 Amateur Radio * April. 1987 



r 




Msm 



Expanding Our Horizons 

Introducing 

Mirage/KLM 1.2-44 LBX 







The first 1 240 MHz to 1 300 MHz 

Made in the U.S.A. 







Factory Tested 
Completely Assembled 
Completely Weatherized Balun 
Also Available Soon . . . 
Power Dividers 




Electrical 

Band Width 1240-1300 MHz 

Gain 18.2 

VSWR Better than 1.5 to 1 

Feed Imp 50 Ohms 

Balun 4:1 Rigid Coax 

Mechanical 

Beam Length 12' 4 

ti6mcni Ltrn&in ««•*•*.....«**•••••• h?. j 

Mast 2" O.D, 

Windload 1 sq. ft. 



SPECIFICATIONS 

15 t 1.2-44 LBX 



1.4 - 



1.3- 

fifi 

> 15 - 



1.1 A 



J mi$ 



1.0 



1?BOOM 



- 19 



- 18 




< 



T 



T 



-I 1 1 1 1 I 

1250 1260 1270 1280 1290 1300 1310 1320 

FREQUENCY (MHz) 



-91 



Mirage Communications Equipment, Inc. 

RO. Box 1000 

Morgan Hill, CA 95037 

(408) 779-7363 



es just by being at 3,150 feet. Un- 
usual thinking, but it did save 
weight in the long run. 

Once again, the power source 
was to be the trusty motorcycle 
battery, with special power cables 
and harnesses made up for the 
various rigs. I brought along two 
batteries for the IC-3AT, as well as 
a separate whip antenna. No 
plans were made for 50-MHz op- 
eration; otherwise, I could have 
brought a 220-MHz transverter 
with 6-meter i-f stage as well. 
Along with support materiel 
(clothes, food, hot coffee, tools, 
Jog, and pencils), the entire pack- 
age weighed in at 60 pounds— not 
bad for a 5-band operation run- 
ning about 8 to 1 Watts per band. 
The plan was to access the top 
between 10 and 11 a.m., operate 
for about three to four hours, and 
begin the descent at about 2 p.m., 
depending on the weather. I duti- 
fully got on the local VHF nets and 
notified everyone I could think of 
to Look for me on Sunday morning 
and M work that rare grid." 

I should have known I was in 
trouble when the Microwave Mod- 
ules MMT 432/144 transverter 
(which regularly self-destructs 
right before one of the mountain- 
top operations) gave me no trou- 
ble whatsoever in prepack tests, 
right up until Saturday evening! At 
one point, J even forgot to put the 
15-dB transceive pad in-line and 
accidentally blasted the input with 
10 Watts for a second, No prob- 
lem—it just kept ticking along at 
10 Watts output, Not only that, the 
synthesizer in the TR-9000, which 
refuses to lock up from time to 
time in inclement weather, was 
as happy as a pig in slop. Not a 
good omen! 

We concluded a grand birthday 
party for my son Ross (who read- 
ers of this space will remember 
was born one year ago during this 
same contest) on Saturday eve- 
ning, and I checked with my broth- 
er Miles near Kingston to get a 
weather report. Yes, it was snow- 
ing, he said, but it looked as if it 
might taper off. The only hitch 
from NOAA weather was a fore- 
cast for high winds on Sunday. 
Oh, what the heck f the worst that 
could happen was that I'd drive 
the two hours and have to call it off 
and come home again. 

I drove up through mostly freez- 
ing rain Saturday evening and ar- 
rived about 11 p,m + , armed with 
two sets of dry clothes, a fresh 
battery t food, and a thermos of 
red-hot coffee from the party. Lit- 
tle did I know how handy that cof- 
fee would come in later! After we 




Back down at the traithead at the end of the ordeal, the entrepid KT2B 
contemplates other mountains to climb and a hot bathtub, though not 
necessarily in that order, (Photo by Miles Putmanj 



exchanged pleasantries, I set the 
alarm for 6 a.m. and hit the sack. 

All too soon it was time to get 
up. I checked outside the apart- 
ment; all was still. The air temper- 
ature seemed to have warmed up, 
and no snow was falling. Miles 
and I agreed to give it a shot and at 
least drive to the base of the trail, 
which proved to be more difficult 
than I had expected! My Honda 
Civic has front-wheel drive, but it 
just gave out halfway up Mead 
Mountain Road to the trailhead. 
While contemplating how to at- 
tack the grade from the other di- 



sc we saddled up the equipment 
and shoved off. Note that by now I 
had scuttled 902 to save weight, 
feeling that the few contacts 1 
might make wouldn't be worth the 
time spent, (Sorry, you 902 fans!) 
The trek was quiet. About 1/8 
mile up I realized I'd forgotten the 
keyer, and went back to get it, 
probably adding another 15 min- 
utes to the climb. About halfway 
up we started to notice that the 
power lines along the road were 
oscillating — a sure sign of wind 
somewhere near the top. Yet it 
was as calm as a summer day 



"/ was suddenly staring in 

the face of a New York State DOT 

snowplow bearing down the mountain, 

hurling sand and salt every which 

way and threatening to plow me 

right into someone's mailbox. " 



rection, I was suddenly staring in 
the face of a New York State DOT 
snowplow bearing down the 
mountain, hurling sand and salt 
every which way and threatening 
to plow me right into someone's 
mailbox. 

We executed a nifty series of 
turns, driving backwards at about 
25 miles per hour in the wrong 
lane for about a half mile until we 
found a secondary road, and 
quickly backed out of the mon- 
ster's path. After the plow roared 
by, I found the road was now quite 
tractable, and in no time we ac- 
cessed the top and trailhead. 
Light snow was falling, but the air 
temperature was still in the 30s, 



where Miles and I stood, with light 
snow fluttering to the ground. We 
paced ourselves slowly and about 
a 1/4 mite from the top the wind 
started to really pick up, At that 
point t we were passed by a Snow- 
cat carrying about six folks, and 
my question "How far to the top?' 1 
was met by the answer "Follow 
the telephone poles!" Useful in- 
formation, indeed. 

Shortly thereafter we crossed 
the saddle of Overlook Mountain 
at 2,800 feet and checked the 
map, According to it, we should 
have been standing by some sort 
of ruins, but all I could see were 
trees and the road stretching 
ahead. I thought it was off to the 



right, but Miles— a pretty good 
map reader and geologist in his 
own way— insisted we continue 
up the road. He was right, for 
shortly afterwards the ghostly 
stone walls of the Overlook Moun- 
tain House loomed directly ahead 
of us. So, too, did the 200' tower of 
WTZA-TV, and we were greeted 
by some pretty stiff winds. 

After climbing to the hotel ruins, 
we noticed the large transmitter 
housing behind it and I knocked 
on the door to make inquiries as to 
compass directions (of course, 
I'd left mine at home!). The chief 
engineer was a friendly fellow 
and determined that the rectangu- 
lar ruins of the hotel ran east- 
west with a southern exposure. 
That was a big help. Unfortunate- 
ly, we couldn't see the fire tower 
(1/2 mile further) at the very top of 
the hill, due to the increasing 
amount of snow being kicked up 
by the wind. 

After determining my purpose 
for needing compass directions, 
the chief engineer scoffed at mak- 
ing any serious distances at 1 296, 
let alone 432. "The snow alone 
will attenuate your signal so badty 
you'll be Jucky to get into Kings- 
ton!" Well, we hams are bull- 
headed at times. I suggested to 
Miles that we take a look at a rise 
above the hotel, and lo and behold 
found the trail to the fire tower. At 
this point the wind was really gust- 
ing , but I thought we could give it a 
shot and Miles agreed. 

After some assembly h I pulled 
out the IC-3AT and called a quick 
CQ on 223.50 simplex, immedi- 
ately working KF6AJ in Connecti- 
cut. He asked me to go to 1296, 
but at that moment the partially 
assembled 432 yagi and 10 feet of 
mast stuck in the snow was 
launched through the air about 20 
feet by an amazing blast of freez- 
ing cold air, Then I realized we 
were standing in the middle of 
some sort of localized blizzard, 
and couldn't even see the hotel 
(200 yards away), TV antenna 
(150 yards), or even our fresh 
tracks made barely 10 minutes 
earlier. Miles was trying to con- 
struct a windbreak from the sec- 
tions of the F9FT portable an- 
tenna and a poncho I brought 
along, but had no luck and was 
starting to really feel the cold i n his 
extremities. 

At this point, several thi, gs be^ 
came very obvious to me: (1) I was 
going to be very lucky to work any- 
one on 1296 because of the pre- 
cipitation attenuation. (2) The 432 
antenna coax had actually frozen 
and broken off from the impact of 



92 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



I 



SPECIALIZED COMMUNICATIONS 
FOR TODAYS RADIO AMATEUR! 



If you are ACTIVE in FSTV 
SSTV, FAX, OSCAR, PACKET, 

RTTY, EME, LASERS, 
or COMPUTERS, then you need 

"SPEC-COM!" 

Published 10 Times 

Per Year 

ByWBOQCD 

(Serving Amateur Radio Since 1967!) 



48 Pages per issue. Loaded with News, Articles, Projects, and Ads. 
SIGN UP TODAY AND GET 3 BACK ISSUES TREE 5 '! 

Join our growi ng membership at the regular $20 per year rate and we will send you 3 back 
issues (of your choice) absolutely ''free**! We also have 2 and 3 year discounts at just $38 
and $56. Foreign surface and air mail subscriptions also available, please write for 
details. Add $2,00 for a special 1 9-year "master article inctex" issue. Allow 2-3 weeks for 
your first issue. Special TRS-80C, Commodore 64 , Appte, IBM Software Catalog Available! 



~i 




VISA 




THE SPEC-COM JOURNAL 

P.O. BOX H, 

I LOWDEN, IOWA 52255 l 

I Credit Card Order? (5<ft added) ^$g Iowa Residents Add 4H Slate Sales Tax | 







POCKET SIZED!? 
1-50O MHZ 

FREQUENCY COUNTER 
BUILT, TESTED. AND 
READY-TO-GOl 

ONLY 849*95 Prepaid 



HAND HELD!' 
1-1300 MHZ 

FREQUENCY COUNTER 
BNC INPUT CONNECTOR 

ONLY $79,95 Prepaid 





PICK UP THOSE WEAK 
SIGNALS' FULLY 
ENCLOSED PA-19E HAS 
5-200 MHZ RANGE 
POWER SUPPLY OPTION 
AT NO CHARGE WITH 
THIS PREAMPLIFIER 

ONLY $24.95 Prepaid 



Without case 



S9 95 



PA-20E PRE AMP 
FULLY ENCLOSED 
WITH A DC-1000 MHZ 
RANGE AND POWER 
SUPPLY OPTION 

ONLY $34.95 Prepaid 

Without case . . . 519,95 




«*" H)6 



Specify lype of radio when ordering preamplifiers, 

DIGITREX ELECTRONICS 



division of NCI 
10073 North Maryann 
Northville. Ml 48167 



West Coast: 
Call Ray Lukas 
805-497-2397 



Persortji cft#c*JL money orders MasterCard or Vtsa am 
wttk&rie Qta#*f*CQD PHONE (313) 34*m* NOW 



Announcing 
New 6- & 8-Pok- Crystal Fillers 

For ICOM. Krnwnod. A * umm Radii* 



•ICOM 730f735ff.H1/745/75 I/K70/R71 A 

SSB 2.1 kHz, R-PoEc— emki replacement 

for FL-HA. MikIcL 1K455HL05X-MS 

-ICOM 10271/471/1271 VW 4W) 11/, 
S-Pole— Great for DXinjMJf BME 

Model IK1Q.7H40CIC-»1 15 

•Kenwood TS-930rtM0/8»/R-HHMl (W 
Soper Selrclm* 250H/ 8-Ptilv 455 kHz Filter— 
Comes mounted on high t|u*ilit> gl^ss PC rnsard for 
the 13-930 an«lTS-940. dmp* into the T5-830. 

Model IR455HIZSC— $125 

•TS-W0/930^«30 Super Selective CW Switch Kit- 
This new kit ■Hows you M ^dd .irHMher CW band- 
width. For example, on the 930 9WS30, ir you al- 
ready have 400 lb or 5CS*I H/ Til ten. iihialted. you can 
no* select a set of IRI250H/ filters. Our 250 H* 
matched set allows for j lower aofee floor for super 
quiet DXing. 

•9 rnHz 8-Pnle Cr?*laJ Filters f«f Estperiraenteni— 

AM 8-Pt>le Filters— $60 
AH 6-Pole Filters-$5« 



For SSB 

A 2.4kHz@GdB 

B. 2. 1 kHz @ 6 dB 

C. L8kHz@odB 

D. 2.2 kHz® 6 dB 
*E.2.2kHz£g fcdfi 

For AM 

A a 6.0kHz@6dB 
*B. 6,0 kHz® 6 dB 



ForFM 

A. L5kfI/#6dB 
B U)kHz#6dB 

ForCW 

A, 600 tfe @6dB 
*B «MJHz @6dB 
* (6- pole} 

$5- tX) .shipping and 
lumtiliri^ on aft orders 




L 



For more information, tail 

I liter nation ul Radio, Inc. 

ftfTSfl.MaceftuBlYd. 

Port St. Lucie, Fl 33452 

|31>5lft7M-6868 

Send S ASK i 39i i lor Ijtrsi catalog. 




TRANSISTORS 



230 MHz 12V C -28V} 



P/N 
MRF412,/A 
MRF421 
MRF422* 
MRF426,/A # 
MRF433 
MRF449JA 
MRF450JA 
MRF453./A 
MRF454,;A 
MRF455JA 
MRF4S8 
MRF475 
MRF476 
MRF477 
MRF479 
MRF465* 
MRF492 
SRF2072 

suFseea 

SRF377S 

SRF3795 

3400 

2SC2290 

25C2S79 



Q 
Q 
Q 
Q 
Q 



Q 

o 

Q 
Q 
O 



Rating 
SOW 

100W 

1S0W 
2SW 

12.SW 
30W 
SOW 
SOW 
SOW 
60W 
BOW 
12W 
3W 
40W 
15W 
15W 
SOW 
65W 

110W 
75W 
SOW 

IfJOW 
SOW 

100W 



Afe* Em. 

S18,00 
22.50 
38.00 
1800 
12.00 
1250 
14,00 
15.00 
15.00 
12.00 
20,00 
3.00 
2.75 
11.00 
10,00 
600 
16.75 
13.00 
25.00 
14.00 
1S.S0 
1B.75 
19-75 
25.00 



Q ■ Satmctad High Gain Matchad Quads 



VHFfUMF TRANSISTORS 



MRF224 

MRF237 

MRF236 

MRF239 

MRF240./A 

MRF245 

MRF247 

MRF807 

MRFS41 

MRF644 

MRF646 

MRF64A 

SD1441 

SD1447 

2N5591 

2 N 6060 

2N6061 

2 N 6082 

2 N 6083 

2N6084 



Rating 

40W 

4W 

30W 

SOW 

40 W 

SOW 

75W 

U5W 

15W 

25W 

40W 

SOW 

1S0W 

1O0W 

25W 

4W 

1SW 

25W 

30W 

40W 



MHz 
13€-174 
136-174 

I3fr174 
138-174 
116 174 
138-174 
136^174 
136174 
407 512 
407 512 
407-512 
407-512 
136174 
136-174 
136-174 
136-174 
138-174 
136-174 
136-174 
136-174 



N0t Ea. 
13.50 

3.00 
1300 
15 00 
18.00 
24.00 
27.00 

3.00 
22,00 
24,00 
28.50 
33,00 
74.50 
32,50 
13.50 

7J5 

9.00 
10.50 
11,50 
13.00 



¥»tch Pr. 
S4S.00 
51.00 
82.00 
42.00 
30.00 
30.00 
31.00 
35.00 
34.00 
28,00 
46.00 
900 
6.00 
25.00 
23.00 
15.00 
37.50 
30.00 
54.00 
32.00 
37 + 00 
41.00 
48.50 
56 00 
Avaitahl* 



Match Pr 
32.00 

30,00 
35.00 
41.00 
85.00 
83.00 

49 00 
54 00 
50.00 
69.00 
170.00 
78.00 
34.00 



M1SC, TRANSISTORS & MODULES 



MRF134 

MRF136 

MRF138V 

MRF137 

MRF138 

MRF140 

MRF146 

MRFT50 

MRF172 

MRF174 

MRF206 

MRF212 

MRF221 

MRF260 

MRF261 

MRF262 

MRF264 

MRF408 

MRF428 

NE41137 



S1600 

21.00 

70.00 

24.00 

35.00 

89.50 

3500 

69.50 

6200 

6000 

11.50 

16.00 

10.00 

7.00 

9.00 

9-00 

13.00 

14.50 

55,00 

3.50 



MRF4S7 

2N1522 

2N3686 

2N404S 

2N4427 

2N5590 

2N5642 

2 N 5643 

2 N 5646 

2 N 5945 

2 N 5946 

2SC2097 

2SC2237 

2SC1969 

S10-12 

SAV6 

SAW 

SC101B 

SC1027 

M 577 37 



24.00 
3100 



14.25 
t0.50 

125 
10.50 

1.25 
10.00 
13.75 
15.00 
18.00 
1000 
13.00 
29.50 
13 50 

3,00 
13.50 
34.50 
34 50 
59.90 
47.50 
47.50 



Selected, matched finals for Icom. Atl*s. Yaetu. KLM. 
Kenwood. Cubic. TWC. etc. Technical assistance and 
cross rolerence on CO, PT, SD f SRF and 2SC PSNs+ 
Quantity parts users— caH lor quote 

WE SHIP SAME DAY • C.O.D./VISA/MC 

Minimum Order— Twenty Dollars 

(619)744-0728 

FAX: (619) 744*1943 




'When You Buy. Say 73 



•» 



RF PARTS 

1320 16 Grand Avenue 
San Marcos. CA 92063 



73 Amateur Radio • April. 1987 93 



the wind blast. (3) The TR-9000 
would probably refuse to lock Lip 
in such cold temperatures. (4) All 
of thetype-N fittings were filling up 
with snow and water faster than I 
could dry them out. (5) If we 
stayed up here much longer, 
Miles and I would probably wind 
up in the frozen vegetables sec- 
tion of the local market. 

As if I needed a clincher, Miles 
turned to me and said (in the best 
tradition of Bob Uecker) P "Hey — 
great seats, buddy! Where's the 
rest of the gang? They're missing 
all of the fun! f ' That did it. He was 
starting to go insane, "Let's get 
the ndshndshndshndsh off this 
mountain!" I shouted. "Good 
idea!" he replied. We threw every- 
thing into a hodgepodge of anten- 
nas, masting, cables, guy rope, 
and equipment, and literally tum- 
bled down the rise to the transmit- 
ter shack, where I proceeded to 
pound on the door vigorously. 

The engineer's face greeted 
me. "Having a nice hike, fel- 
lows?" he asked. I inquired as to 
the possibility that we be allowed 
to come inside for a minute and 
warm up enough for the trip down. 
He obliged us, and I wound up 
getting a guided tour of the 250- 
kW transmitter facility- Seems 
they were also having their prob- 
lems with the weather, and the 
crew was trying to repair an air 



waveguide to 1-5/8" hardline tran- 
sition at the antenna— just 200 
feet above the mountain in what 
was now a howling blizzard. 

What made things worse was 
that the crewman at the top either 
lost power to his Motorola handie- 
talkie or wasn't listening as his 
friends below tried to call him off 
the tower and wait out the storm. 
Next, someone managed to drop 
a come-along wrench several feet 
down the tower onto the head of 
another crew member, who was 
brought inside with a nice gash in 
his scalp. 1 quickly brought out the 
still red-hot thermos of coffee 
(which we had been gulping up on 
the ridge) and offered him a cup, 
while the engineer brought him 
out a blanket and a pillow to lie 
down on. 

The decision was made that this 
poor fellow would have to go to a 
local hospital for observation, so 
the engineer gave me the equiva- 
lent of the old western movie 
cliche 'There's a train leaving 
town in half an hour. Be on it." 
Except that our train was a Snow- 
cat. Miles and I didn't care— we 
were just happy to have the ride. 
Soon enough, we were roaring 
down the same road we had 
climbed up, except that the blow- 
ing snow had now come around to 
the south face of the mountain 
and hit us full force. Also, a Snow- 



cat 's treads throw up an awful lot 
of snow, especially if you happen 
to be riding on the back. We were 
soaked by the time we reached 
the bottom around 1 :30 p.m. , with 
only one contact to show for it! 

After drying off at Miles' place, 
we caught a late lunch at the 
pancake house in Kingston and 
watched the television tower 10 
miles away on Overtook disap- 
pear and reappear every ten sec- 
onds in the snow- The storm front 
bringing all of this wind and snow 
was parked right along the ridges 
in the Catskilts! No doubt that poor 
fellow was still up at 200 feet trying 
to secure that transition, since no 
one was able to get his attention 
by the time we had left the hill. 
Afterwards, I dropped Miles at his 
apartment and drove home, arriv- 
ing at 6 p.m. just in time to watch 
the end of the Giants playoff 
game, grab a quick meal, and get 
on the last three hours of the 
Sweepstakes. 

Well, there you have it. If there's 
a lesson to be learned, it's that no 
one can ever underestimate the 
severity of the weather at the tops 
of these peaks— even those 
smaller hilis around 3,000 feet. 
Was I discouraged? Sure. But I'll 
try it again next winter, except that 
I'M be better prepared for the 
weather. At least I had a nice hike 
on the way up. And it isn't every 



day that you get a guided tour of a 
UHF television station! 

Letters Dept. 

Walter Stringer N8BSG writes 
to ask how he can attempt to make 
skeds to work stations on 10 GHz 
either near his home in southeast- 
ern Michigan or from a mountain- 
top expedition. Walter is using 
converted TR-6 police radar units, 
running wideband FM on 10.25 
GHz and 10.28 GHz. Walter, I 
suggest you contact the various 
specialty newsletters for VHF, 
and one good choice in your area 
would be the Midwest VHF Re- 
port, published by Roger Gox 
WB0DGF, 3451 Dudley Street, 
Lincoln NE 68503. A year T s sub- 
scription costs but $10 and may 
help you line up those needed 
skeds. 

Kevin Neal (HCR 62-222, Pip- 
pin AZ 72634) writes to inquire 
about a schematic for a Boonton 
91-27 probe for a Boonton 92 me- 
ter. Kevin, my probe is a 91-1 2F so 
I can't help you out, but perhaps 
one of our readers can? These 
probes do pop up on the surplus 
market, and I would suggest try- 
ing Brian Kent at Kentronix {PO 
Box 2444, Allaire Airport, Farm- 
ingdale NJ 07727) t as he may 
be able to help you . . . Until next 
month, see you Above and 
Beyond \M 




Mike Stone WB0QCD 
PO Box H 
Lowden I A 52255 

THE N9CAI ATV/R 
SUPER SYSTEM 

This month, Td like to talk about 
what an organized, cooperative, 
positive-thinking ATV group of 
about 10-20 people can accom- 
plish in just a few years. I speak 
from personal experience on this 
subject. In the entire state of Iowa 
and extreme NW Illinois, there 
was zero FSTV activity in 1979. 
Today, there are more than 100 
active stations. 

Our now 30+ member group, 
called the B.R.AT.S. ATV Group 
(Big River Amateur Television 
System, not to be confused with 
the Baltimore BRATS ATV 
Group), does not meet weekly or 
monthly. We are lucky if we have 
two or three official meetings a 
year. On ATV, you see, you don't 



have to do what other dubs are 
required to do. We +f see" each 
other all the time! 

We do hold a regular ATV net on 
Sunday evenings at 8 p.m. in con- 
junction with a long-standing 2- 
meter FM net. It gives us a regular 
time and meeting place to catch 
up on all the week's activities. A 
regular net also constantly expos- 
es the mode to non-ATVers, New- 
comers will come at you right out 
of the woodwork! 

Our ATV group sponsors three 
amateur repeater systems and 
one remote transmitter: 

1) The N9CAI ATV/R UHF fast- 
scan TV repeater (mode B) takes 
inputted video signals on 439.25 
MHz and passes them out {with- 
out desense) in band at 421,25 
MHz. This system accepts stan- 
dard 3.58 colorburst NTSC video 
and 4.5 MHz audio FM subcarrier 
sound. 

2) An auxiliary audio feed (not 




Photo A. WB0QCD in Iowa as 
seen at WB0ZJPin St. Louis, Mis- 
souri — 200 mife& ^way. 

link— there is a difference) is fed 
from 144,340 MHz FM simplex 
and goes out the TV system at 
425.75 MHz. 

3) The remote transmitter 
{mode A) part of the system out- 
puts at 421 .25 MHz as welf. 

4) The N9CAI-1 packet radio 
digipeater accepts AX.25 protocol 
at 145-01 MHz FM, We have a 
videotape feed off this source as 
well, which can be called up on 
the main ATV/R system. 

Yes, it sounds complicated, but 
you get used to it in a hurry around 
here. 

Shown in Fig. 1 is a block dia- 



gram of the N9CAI ATV repeat- 
er, remote transmitter, and pack- 
et radio digipeater system locat- 
ed at St. Ambrose College in 
Davenport, Iowa. This system is 
unique because it has nine TV 
video feeds to choose from in 
mode A. These feeds were 
brought to us in part by Tracy 
Monson N9AEP and his diversi- 
fied home-brew touchtone™ com- 
mand systems. 

•Channel 1 —NTSC colorbars or a 
JJ live" on-campus television cen- 
ter production feed. We watch 
basketball games, football 
games, football replays, stage 
plays, VCR editing, and other self- 
programming. 

•Channel 2— A Radio Shack 
(Tandy Corp.) 64KTRS-80C Color 
Computer with disk-driven Mul-T- 
Screen (cable-TV type) ATV bul- 
letin board software, I keep it up- 
dated every Friday. The troops 
use it constantly, 

•Channel 3— A "live/ 1 moving B/ 
W Hitachi "security 11 and shack 
camera. 

•Channel 4— A FSTV window, 
•Channel 5 — Our packet radio 
feed from VHF. Even those mem- 



94 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 




P.C. ELECTRONICS 2522 S. PAXSON LN 
TOM W60RG MARYANN WB6YSS 



ARCADIA CA 91006 (818) 447-4565 

CompuServe 72405,1207 



ELECTRONICS 



SEE US AT DAYTON 




vrs* 







AMATEUR 
TELEVISION 

ATV MADE EASY WITH OUR SMALL ALL IN ONE BOX TC70-1 
TRANSCEIVER AT A SUPER LOW $299 DELIVERED PRICE! 

CALL 1-818-4474565 AND YOURS WILL BE ON ITS WAY IN 24 HRS {VIA ups surface in gout. USA). 



TC70-1 FEATURES: 

* Sensitive UHF GaAsfet tuneable downcorwerter for receiving 

* Two frequency 1 watt p.e,p. transmitter. 1 crystal included 

* Crystal locked 4.5 mHz broadcast standard sound subcarrier 
' 10 pin VHS color camera and RCA phono jack video inputs 

* PTL (push to look) T/R switching 

* Transmit video monitor outputs to camera and phono jack 

* Small attractive shielded cabinet - 7 x 7 x 2.5" 

* Requires 13.8vdc @ 500 ma. -* color camera current 

Just plug in your camera or VCR composite video and audio, 70cm 

antenna, 12 to 14 vdc, and you are ready to transmit live action 
color or black and white pictures and sound to other amateurs. 
Sensitive downconverter tunes whole 420-450 mHz band down to 
channel 3. Specify 439.25, 434.0, or 426:25 mHz transmit 
frequency. Extra transmit crystal add $15. 

Transmuting equipment sold only to licensed radio amateurs verified in the 
Galibook lor legal purposes It recently licensed or upgraded, send copy of 
license. Receiving downcon venters available to all starting at $59 (TVC-2G). 



WHAT ELSE DOES IT TAKE TO GET ON ATV? 

Any Tech class or higher amateur can get on ATV, If you have a 
camera you used with a VCR or SSTV & a TV set, your cost will just 
be the TC70 and antenna system. If you are working the AMSAT 
satellites you can use the same 70cm antennas on ATV. 

DX with TC70-1S and KLM 440-27 antennas line of sight and 
snow free is about 22 miles, 7 miles with the 440-6 normally used 
for portable uses like parades, races, search & rescue, damage 
accessment, etc. Get 50 watts p.e.p. with the Mirage D24N or 
D1 01 0N-ATV amp for greater DX or punching thru obstacles. 

The TC70-1 has tuff bandwidth for color, sound, like broadcast. 
You can show the shack K home video tapes, computer 
programs.repeat SSTV, weather radar, or even Space Shuttle 
video if you have a home satellite receiver, See the ARRL 
Handbook chapt. 20 & 7 for more info & Repeater Directory for 
locat ATV repeaters. 

PURCHASE AN AMP WITH THE TC70-1 & SAVE! 

50 WATT WITH D24N -ATV. ...$499 

All prices include UPS surface shipping in cont. USA 




COMPLETE ATV STATION 




TV CAMERA 



TC70-1..,$299 

ATV Transceiver 

Astron RS20M...S129 
13.8 vdc 20A Powo? Supply 




Mirage D24N $219 

(options') ail mode 70cm amp 
13,6vdc 9 amps @ 50' wans RF 



KLM 440-27 14dbd $107 
KLM 440-14 11dbd $77 
KLM 440-6 3dbd $62 



HAMS! Call or write for full line ATV catalog. ...downconverters start at only $59 



j - 



When You Buy, Say 73 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 95 



TH£ 0/IV£AJ/Wt; TQWft NQCfit f\T\tM #£f&4m£ f fcmm fiM/Jsfifrntf 






%J £***i 






Til-Ht 



R 






Iff 

"all 



K 






t+* 









P? 

ruf*<t 



in 



i p 



.sj-xr^ 



&a/h£ ftar 



p**»ip 



CtfAWfJ MY 
*/*7 






X^ 



® 









± 



I 



TtKJILtHtiCf 






*-N 



£<$$ 



Tl 



i.AJAi.lli. 






£3 



HOpJ 






*»•-* 



J 



-» 






W 






ml 



TW 



H rtwiFltD 41 



* 



l?v 






IN 

T 



* 



11^ 



^/ 



ftLTttS 






3.0-wft-n* 



IW 



k 






MA 

Wsfrtp 



^ 



Wf-TV 



*F 111 



1 e^i* J 



X 



_± 






it* 



***** 



VCR 



3L wtrtft tfHr 



KK*p*TilJ, 



r 



rat* 



V.o.fc. 



f,i^i1 



C W VHf= 



t^nrti-iwT 









Wf A THE ft. ffrOAJL Qw*t^f) 
F£«> (N^&J K./A) SttttM 






W0 



Fig. 1. The Davenport, iowa, N9GAI/R repeater and remote transmitter system. 



bers not involved in packet can 
watch the fun. 

•Channel 6— Another "live" B/W 
camera watching the college's 
KALA-FM radio station disk jock- 
eys do their thing. We "tune 1 ' 88.1 
and listen to the station, as wefl as 
"see" the student spinning the 
wax. One of the Ambrose DJ stu- 
dents is also a club member and a 
ham (KA0GOA). The other night, 
we called him on his phone to let 
him know we were all watching 
him, and he held up a sign that 
said QRZ CQ-ATV. It was great! 
•Channel 7— Another 64K C0C0 
using a ROM pack spectrum ana- 
lyzer program that graphically 
shows your input on 2 meter FM. 
•Channel 8— One of the "hottest" 
channels! It is our gameport feed. 
Four (interactive via 2-meter-FM 
touchtones) games are available 
to play: Joker Poker, Dice, Horse 
Race, and Blackjack, 

There is, of course, no real mon- 
ey used in this entertainment 
channel, To drop in a quarter 
(members only), you hit TT#8 on 
your 2-meter rig. Other numbers 
control the actual play of the 
game. High scores into the mul- 
ti-billions are recorded and saved 
in memory along with the catlsign 
of the top seven finishers per 
game. Competitiveness is high, 
and each day brings a new lead- 
er. We reset all scores about ev- 
ery two months. This, as far as we 
know, is the only such "inter- 
active*" amateur system in the 



country— perhaps in the world! 
•Channel 9— Our latest addition. I 
took an "on sale" Gold Star VHS 
VCR player ($160) and had Matt 
Reed NflGIK (our resident solder 
junky) modify it for automatic 
rewind, restart, and play hold. We 
run all kinds of taped programs- 
special events, Field Day stuff, 
ATV DX replays, lectures, bloop- 
ers, etc. The audio is also fed so 
all can hear. Future feeds include 
an outside camera and a soon-to- 
come, authorized weather radar 
feed from nearby KWQC-TV(N8C 
affiliate). 

As mentioned, afl nine TV video 
feeds make up what we call mode 
A, Mode B is the actual fast-scan 
TV signal repeater. The system 
employs a P.C, Electronics RTX-4 
transmitter (Kreepy Peepie KFA5 
1-Watt exciter), which drives a 
small Allnco amplifier to an output 
of about 15 Watts. The 15 Watts 
(TT-selectable ON/OFF) then 
drives a larger modified Collins 
UHF aircraft 4CX250B single- 
tube, high-power tube amplifier 
for about 90-100 Watts "aver- 
age" output. The large Collins 
amp is preferred over a Mirage- 
type transistor one due to long pe- 
riods of keydown time and better 
color. 

The signal passes through 
about 90 feet of Andrews 7/8-inch, 
50-Ohm hardline (with brass con- 
nectors) to our split 4-KLM (6-ele- 
ment) beam array. Our group has 
tested many types of horizontally 



polarized antennas for the best 
omni-directional patterns with re- 
spectable gain, and the beams 
have given us the best perfor- 
mance. Each A440-6 KLM beam 
has a 60-degree beamwidth pat- 
tern and 7.6 measured dB of gain. 

We cover all areas with abso- 
lutely closed-circuit, P5 color TV 
pictures, out to about 40-50 miles 
(if you do your homework on the 
other end, of Gourse). We esti- 
mate a genuine 100-mile cover- 
age radius on this system, which 
is remarkable for UHF, let alone a 
television repeater. 

There are a number of pub- 
lished antenna designs (such as 
stacked big wheels, slots, etc.) 
that perform well for those ATV 
groups now using horizontal po- 
larization and desiring to remain 
that way. As stated in my previous 
columns, disrupting polarizations 
in established areas can mean 
DEATH to ATV activity, You*ve 
heard that lecture before, so I 
won't go into it again. If you need 
some further information on these 
types of antennas, write to Gerald 
Cromer K4NHN in Cayce, South 
Carolina, or drop me a line. 

On receive, we use a simple 
W9DNT Alford Slot antenna with a 
couple of KLM 440-6 beams as 
kickers to bring in a couple distant 
and weak-signal areas. An Ad- 
vanced Receiver Research GaAs- 
FET preamp is ahead of a 7- 
pole Spectrum International in- 
ter-digital bandpass filter and a 



Microwave Modules crystal-con- 
trolled downconverter, which has 
a 45-MHz i-f rf output. Another 
line preamp is used (Channel 
Master VHF-TV 10-dB model) 
about 50 feet into the run, which 
travels over another 160 feet of 
Belden 9913 to our transmit- 
ter room. 

Everything is mounted near the 
antenna in a milkbox-type weath- 
erproof ed container at the foot of 
our second tower tripod/mast ar- 
rangement. There is approximate- 
ly 75 feet of horizontal separation 
between the transmit antennas 
and the receive antennas. It took 
filtering and proper cabling on 
both ends to keep the extra 85 
Watts of "natural desense" out of 
incoming weak pictures. Contrary 
to a lot of negative predictions by 
some, the system works and 
works well! 

A special P.C. Electronics VOR 
circuit board senses the presence 
of video TV sync (not radio carri- 
ers) and automatically turns on 
the "repeat" transmitter. Surplus 
RCA broadcast distribution ampli- 
fiers set the proper levels on all 
feeds on mode A, including the 
FSTV input on mode B. A Tektron- 
ix 529 Waveform Monitor Scope is 
used on-site to keep everything 
inline. 

Our whole system is housed on 
a third-floor room T just above the 
FM radio station, within the col- 
lege complex. Electricity is provid- 
ed us at no charge and we can 
come and go to the system as we 
please. It is a nifty arrangement 
for which we owe thanks to our 
member sponsors, N9CAI and 
WDflAMA, Stop by our ATV work- 
shop session on Saturday night at 
Dayton (see below) to see this sys- 
tem on tape in action. 

Dayton ATV Workshops 

You are invited to join other fel- 
low USATVS members at our spe- 
cial ATV workshop meeting/con- 
ferences sponsored jointly by the 
Spec-Corn Journal and the Chi- 
cago-based Peacock ARC (a club 
of prominent TV and radio broad- 
cast amateurs) to be held this year 
during the upcoming Dayton, 
Ohio, Hamvention. 

The location of these informal, 
social geRogethers has changed 
from previous years, We will be at 
a large two-room suite at the Ra- 
rnada Inn North, 1/2 mile south of 
1-70 and 1-75 in north Dayton (4079 
Little York Road, Dayton OH 
45414). Ask for Beth if you calf 
(513-890-9500) to make room 
reservations ($60). 

Attend all the doings at the Day- 



96 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



r 



THE SMILEY ANTENNA CO. 

THE HAND TUNED PERFORMANCE SYSTEM 

FEATURING PORTABLE RADIO SIMULATION TUNING 




^274 



TH£ TUNED ANTENNA 



Electrical 

/mpecfancB 




Mechanical 

CQultng MjiQnai , 



Quality through Technology" 

See Us At Dayton 



,50 Walts 
113 932 MHz 

. Matcfiud ip the Portable 
SpeciaUMtl Tuning 
A^dildbie 



.A Drpped ifi Synthetic 

Rubber to Seal and Webb 
Col Prtva.n[ing 
Distortion 
B 1 PVC Covering. 

2 Mil-S|H3i: MPQ-2O0O, A 
Soivem and Acid 
Resi&Sanl Covering 



floating Etgmtflt A 



B 



Hencal Wound H^fdaned 
Slael W«re. Copper Plated- 
10* LOwur Res is (an cu 4i 'Hi 
Higher Velocity. 
i£5 dia H-gh Cartoon 
Steel, fi,as Wound 
Flexible Shalt Core- 
Plated 



I 



, * 



M 



■ ■ 
Jr. 



■■ • 



■ i I 4 



AvaiJabiflfTorTT 



J L_l 



136-174 MHZ 



Available from 
210 250 MHZ 



I 1 I I I 



Available from 
440-470 MHZ 



FOR DEALER « jt ■ ■ *»&** _-« -»«.** 
LOCATION CALLBie 579-8916 

SMILEY ANTENNA CO., INC. 40e la CRESTa heights ROAD Ll cajOn, ca raw 




For Computerises and Amateur Radio „,, 



\ fl ' "rFT* 







Why You Should Subscribe! 

Read what our subscribers say! 



r, 



DMHERCIAL- AVIONICS- SOLID STATE- OIPOLE- LONG WIRE' MILITARY- MARINE 



1 






"THE AMERICAN ORIGINAL" 

MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS ^ t01 ^? £ 






o 

K 



IC^J 3 







AUTOMATIC ANTENNA MATCHER 

FOR ALL S.S.S. RADIOS 



® 








c "ONE ANTENNA 1QO KHZ. TO 200 MHZ."A^ 

" JMAXCOM has made G/otoa/ Commun/ca^ofts Simple!!! & S 

* ISO WATTS TO 10,000 WATT3 ^ t^ 3 

9 9. ♦* *♦ i 



IN MODELS: 
ATTS 

93533. TO SI, 

VSWR 1.5:1 
OR LESS 



•Your magazine is the finest innovation that I have seen in him, 
radio since 1953 - excepts, maybe the all -solid state transceiver 
Carl Soltesz, W8PFT • ...have most certainly received my 
moneys worth in software... Michael Regan, K8WRB * ...you 
have found a nice niche for CTM in packet... you have me 
gelling interested... Charlie Curie, AD4F Chattanooga, 
TN * The packet computer info convinced me to subscribe. John 
Skubick, KSJS • Enclosed is my check for renewal of my 
subscription. I enjoy the down to earth and homey style of your 
magazine and the many fine computer articles... Andy 
Kosiorek, Lake wood, OH * / was both pleased and dismayed 
upon becoming acquainted with your magazine at HAM -COM H 
Pleased that 1 discovered your magazine - dismayed that 1 didn'l 
long before nuw. Bill Lattian, AK5K ■ ...CTM gives the 
finest coverage to packet radio that / have seen in any of the 
computer or amateur radio magazines. It would appear that CTM 
has just the right blend of packet amateur radio articles and 
computer articles. Barry Siegfried, K2MF * Of the three HAM 
magazines I received each month QST r 73 and CTM f CTM is 
the only one I read from cover to cover and carry with me during 
my travels abroad. Most of the time it remains in that country 
Buck Rogers j K4ART_^ 



FIVE YEAR 



m 



u 

K 
-* 
■ 

Z 
< 

■ 



£>£> 



xO 



<r ^^ 







* 



GUARANTY o 
□ N * 

MOST MODELS z 



U.S.A.$18.00 1 Yr - $10.00 6 Months (Limited 
Otter) $33.00 2 Yr - $48.00 3 Yr 
Mexico & Canada $32.00 1 Yr (Surface) 
Other Countries (Air) $68.00 (Surface) $43.00 lYr 

TJ.S.FUNDS ONLY 
Permanent Subscription $150.00 
Sample Copy $3.50 - Back Issues $3.50 



& 



*> 



•vy 



u 



V 



MAXCOM' 



52 



*-I±rt 



t j* rt 






o 

> 
> 

7- 



& 



X M'v -** Absolutely no tuning with a MAXCOM system. •* 

^h JF Stmpty connect . dial vour fr&Quency and tat k. a 

^AT That's it, just TALK I 

OVER 4000 MAXCOM STA TtONS WORLD WIDE 5 

MAXCOM, INC. BOX 5QS, FT. LAUD., FL.3330S ' 

f 3QS-527-5172 © t»8« M*j(corT», m c , . 

[ THE BOTTOM LINEi "MAXCOM WOBKa" J 

"When You Buy, Say 73" 



* 

Q 
I 






:;Narie' 



w i i . i iMMh'ihi i F i iM i ' < nii i wi i < i :■:-:■:■:■:■:-;■:■: ■:■: :■:■: ■:■:■.:■:■. ■ 



v^l 



: :Citillf 

."."-"^ , V Hi' 



i % 'i- i i' i ■ ■ fc d l l FTT^TTTT^fT^T^TT^T^T^.'. ■. , .V¥"^F¥¥T¥T" 



•■ ■jl'vi'v^v/jll ; : :: : : :": : : : x| '■:■:'■ :'-y. ;:::|:::' 



.¥*¥¥¥W¥¥¥W¥^^^.^' 



I i i i < I I I i I I I I i 1 ■ i | i ... | 1 ll.,, , 1 pt-, r 



: lT iLliiflLiii v ... . .-.:■:. .'. /. ..'.:■. ..-.■■ ■.■■.-.■ ■.-■,■.■.■,-,■.■■.■.■,■,-.■■,■,■.■■.■.■.■■.■,■,--.■,-,■,-.■,-.-■.■.■.-.■.-■,■.■.■.■•,■.■.■,■.-.■.■-.■.■.■.■..■.■ ■,■,-,■.■.■-■ 



m 

in 

Hi 
1 

11 

ll 

Ii 
11 
ll 
j 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 97 



ton Hamfest on Friday and Satur- 
day, and tnen come rest your feet 
and tearn more about amateur ra- 
dio fast-scan television at our ses- 
sions. $1 will be asked at the door 
both days to cover the expensive 
"extra" meeting room, 

Friday's ATV workshop is from 
7 until 1 1 p.m. It will be an informal 
get-together rag-chew session, 
with all the various groups of 
ATVers from around the country 
showing off their edited color VCR 
programs about their local activi- 
ty, repeaters, remote transmit- 
ters, DX, clubs, special events, 
etc. Bring your latest, uncensored 
commercial TV bloopers. Keep 
the XYL and kids at home or back 
in the motel unless they won't 
mind a lot of boring technical 
conversation. 

We will try and have an operat- 
ing FSTV station on the air possi- 
bly into the Dayton ATV repeater; 
Vertical polarization will be used 
on UHR The 2-meter ATV input 
channel there is 147.450 FM. We 
will be there or on 144,340 MHz. 
How many ATV mobiles will show 
up once again? We will award a 
$19.95 Hamfest Game to every 
mobile that makes it (must be veri- 
fied at the Ramada or Dayton 
Hamvention location). 



Henry Ruh KB9FO {former Edi- 
tor of AS ATV) of the PARC group 
will present an update and film of 
the new Chicago 1 ,350-foat high 
John Hancock Building KB9FO 
ATV/R system around 9 p.m. (See 
"Repeater Update 1 ' below.) it 
should be quite an interesting and 
relaxing night. 

On Saturday, the ATV work- 
shop doors will be open from 
3p,m, on. Formal ATV lecture 
presentations will begin prompt- 
ly at 7. At 7:30. I will speak and 
show a videotape on the fancy 
Davenport, Iowa. N9CAI ATV re- 
peater system. At 8:30, our spe- 
cial guest speaker will be John 
Beanland G3BVU/W1 of Spec- 
trum International, Inc. If you 
haven't had the opportunity to 
hear John lecture, you are in for a 
real treat. He will speak on the 
importance of good inter-digital 
bandpass filtering in the 80s, 
Bring your notepad! 

Other Dayton ATV events in- 
clude the annual 7 p.m. WOLMD/ 
W9NTP Saturday night SSTV get- 
together at the Holiday Inn North 
and the Saturday afternoon 
(1300-1445) Dayton ATV Forum 
meeting held by Tom O'Hara 
W60RG. The forum will include a 
talk on ATV basics, a talk by Gary 



Heston W6KVC on portable ATV 
applications, and a talk by Brace 
Brown WA9GVK/4 on FM ATV, 
standards, comparisons, and 
equipment. Don't forget to stop by 
and see the P.C. Electronics and 
Wyman ATV booths as well. 

Repeater Update 

Last month, I talked about the 
new PARC Chicago ATV repeater 
announcement. The latest news is 
that the transmitter is being locat- 
ed up on the John Hancock build- 
ing — not just on the top floor or on 
the roof, but two-thirds up the left 
side tower, with 1 ,350 feet of an- 
tenna height and three feet of 
coax. Way to go, guys! Look for it 
in the Midwest— 1 20 Watts of rf on 
421.25 MHz— especially during 
band openings. 

Henry got permission from The 
Kavouras Company and WMAQ- 
TV (where he is employed) for a 
weather radar feed. Chicago ATV 
Is Jl on the move'' again after be- 
ing dormant for several years. Old 
timers, watch out for the newcom- 
ers. The old t do-nothing days are 
over. If you live in or near Chicago 
for about 100-150 miles, you may 
want to get an ATV downconvert- 
er or build an antenna because 
now there is something more to 



watch than just postcard IDs, 
weak attic colorbars, and ques- 
tionable channel 7 TV feeds. 

ATV Directories 

Many of you have written want- 
ing to know more information 
about the North American 
USATVS ATV Directory and the 
1987/88 ATV Repeater Directory. 
For more information about these 
directories, write to Spec-Corn 
Communications & Publishing 
Group, PO Box H t Lowden IA 
52255. 

Special Offers 

73 ATV fans, you can get a spe- 
cial <K get started" FSTV incentive 
deal from P.C, Electronics (2522 
S. Paxson Lane, Arcadia CA 
91006; 818-447-4565), Their pop- 
ular TVC-2 420-450-MHz (CharV 
net-3 output) ATV downconverter 
circuit board— built and tested, 
but minus the cabinet— regularly 
$49, is now just $39! The finished 
unit, a TVC-4, comes all ready to 
operate in an attractive Ten-Tec- 
style box with 1 10 V ac supply — 
regularly $89, it is now just $74! 
Simply mention this special 73 
magazine Jl ATV Column 11 offeror 
purchase this gear at Dayton from 
booth #359 to get your discounts 



NEMAL ELECTRONICS 





HARDLINE -50OHM 


11 


CONNECTORS — MADE IN U.S.A. 


Nemal No. 


Description 




PtfFt 


Nemil No, Description 




Etch 


FXAJ2 


1/2" Aluminum &tock lacker 




.&& J* 


NFJ2Q Typ« N tor Belden 991J 




4 25 


FLC12 


}/Z CtJir. Copper Black Jacket 




15* 


NE?23 H Female Bef (ten 9913 




4 75 


FLC7B 


7/8" Co+r topp&f 




J &2 * 


PL 2 5 8AM Amphenoi Ban el 




t 45 


NM12AL 


H Conn 1 /2" Alum {Mate or Female) 




22.00 ^ 


PL 2 59 '^ndiirrJPlujifnrRGa 213 


10/5 90. or 


:*S 


NM12CC 


NCfjnn., 1/2" Copper (Male or Female) 


22. DD II 


PL255AM Amphenoi PL2S9 


10/7.90 nr 


m 


NM73CC 


N Conn. 1/i" Copper (Mais or Female) 


54.00 


PL259TS PL259 lellon/Sto 




1.59 




COAXIAL CABLES 






UG21D TflKfttOpRGfl. 2U. 234 
UGB3& N Female to Pt 259 




1-00 
6.50 


Ntmal tic 


. Description 


1D0FI. 


Per Ft. 


UGiSC BMCfiGba 




Us 


1)00 


RG 8 95it Shielded Mil. Spec 


2&.QD 


32 


UG14G SP239tg Male N 




6.50 


no? 


RCS 95% Shielded Foam 


30 00 


n 


UG 1 7576 Adapter lor FtG58/$9 lapecityj 


]D/2/Q0or 


.22 


1110 


flG8xmShield(mifli8) 


MMW 


17 


UG255 SG239 to BNC Am phenyl 




375 


1L 30 


RG213/U Mil Spec 3fit Sriidd 


34.0-Q 


36 


HA5M& TNtRGSS 




4.35 


IMO 


RGm/U Mil. Spec ■ Dbl Silrer 


155 00 


: bb 


MftSOM SMARGt42fi 




a. 95 


liHIi 


BddenS9l3 Low Loss 


4&.Q0 


50 


S0239AM Amphenal 20239 




99 


1705 


RG142B/U Tellon/Silwr 


140.00 


150 


GROUND STRAP- 


BRAID 




13 L0 


BG217/L5/&" 50 ohm Obi. Shield 


30.00 


85 


Ntmil Ma Description 




Per Ft 


im 


RG223/U Mil Spec Dbl. Sittfj 


30.00 


as 


G53E1 3/8" Tinned Copper 




JO 


(45-0 


RG174 9H Shielded Mil Spec 


1Z.00 


14 


G-S12 I/2." Tinned Copper 




40 




ROTOR CABLE — 8 COND. 




GSJ1& V 1 6" Tinned topper 




15 










GS316S 3/16" Silver Plated 




.35 


HtmilNo. 

8C1822 


Description 

2-18 Ga.. 6-22 tia. 


IMF:. 
I&00 


Per Ft, 

21 


GROUND WIRE — STRANDED 




n£l6?Q 


2 16 Ga., 5-2 D Ga. Heavy Duty 


34 DO 


.35 


Nenul No. Description 




Per Ft 


* Shipping $3 00 - tQO Ft / Conn S3 00 / 1 U %1 DD M 


HW0& 6Ga insulated stranded 




.35 


Cali ■ 


ji write for complete pric 


elist 


Nemals3 


2 page Cable & Connector Selection Guide 


is available at no charge with orders of $50 0( 


) or more, or at a cost of $4.00 


individually. 



* * * + * PRESENTING ■* ■* ■* * -* 

CABLE TV 
DESCRAMBLERS 

***** STARRING ***** 

JERROLD, HAMLIN, OAK 

ArVD OTMCft FAMOUS MANUFACTURERS 

• FlN£it WARRANT* PROGRAM AVAILABLE 

■ LOWEST RFTAIJ. /WHOLESALE PRICES IN U S 

■ ORDERS SHfPPEO FfiOWl STOCK UtfTHlN 14 JHOUJ7& 



FOR FREE CATALOG QMW 1 S0Q-34 5 S91 7 
FOR ALL INFORMATION 1-818-716-5914 



^17A 



NEMAL ELECTRONICS, INC. 

12240 N.E. 1 4 Ave., No. Miami, FL 33161 



(305) 893—3924 • Telex 6975377 
^ 50 24-Hr. FAX (305)895—8178 



PACIFIC CABLE CO. IMC 

FfESfDA CA f 1135 



1986-87 CALL DIRECTORY 

(on microfiche) 

Call Directory $8. 

Name Index . , + $g. 

Geographic Index . , ,$g. 

Shipping per order $3. Al I th ree $20. 

BUCKMASTER PUBLISHING 

Mineral, Virginia 23117 
703:894-5777 "' 



MINI-MOBIL MOUNT BY 

Paul tronics 



*1 



Cellular, VHF,UHF 
Silver/Black ■Scratch Proof 
; Water Proof BLow Profile 

$2 1 .95 plus $3.00 S&H *" 2&7 
P.O. Bo* 804 1, Berkley, MJ 4S072 



I 



MASTER MORSE CODE IN 40% LESS TIME 

Method Eliminates the 10 - 13 Wpm Plateau 

ADOPTED BY THE U.S. 

IE STRUCT I OK HOW 
OUR NEW CO r* PUT BR 



MILITARY AS THE NEW TRAINING 
STANDARD 

OFFERED ON ft LTD I O TAPES or 
PROGRAM FOR THE COMMODORE 
64. Both methods teach the fcfrttie ALPHABET^ 
NUMBERS, PUNCTUATION and SOCIAL CHARACTERS 
in 39 TRIALS at 20 WPM* 

Specify Audio Tapes {five cassette s > , 
Floppy 0isk or corr-puter cassette. 

519.95 (XL.. RES. include $1 Sal^fl tax) 
^ 77 TSG . P.O. BOX 7. ASHLEY, IL 62808 



THIS MONTHS GOODIE FROM THE 

CANDY STORE: 




mm 



S440S 



TELEX HV GAIN 



M.I. 
L T i* 




■ •■ 1 



»'-*»^ 







Over 7500 Ham rtlaied itcitki In iis>ck. All prices FOB Preston. 
Seiid SASE for NBW HT prtct? hsi. More ^peciak in ctasiifietllf, 

ROSS DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

78 Sourn Stale SiteeL Pr&ston. Idaho 032^3- 
TolophQTO {2(B) 852-OQ30 We Close a.1 2:0Q OH MOW. & SAT 



^254 



98 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 




Cr**to*DttlgnCoatd 



ROOF TOWERS! 

A size to fit your needs 
6, 10, or 15 ft. 



10 FT 
CR-30 
ILLUST 




Competitively Priced 
Only from your 
CREATE dealer 

Galvanized Steel 
Bracing and Hardware 



Dist. by ^i&7 

ORION HI TECH 

P.O. Box8771 r 
Calabasas, CA. 
91302 
(213)663-2541 



MOVING? 

Subscription 
Problem? 

Call our toll-free number: 

1-800-227-5782 

Monday through Friday 
9 a.m. through 5 p.m. EST 

Please have your mailing label 

in front of you, as well as your 

cancelled check or credit card 

statement if you are having 

problems with payment. 



THE RF CONNECTION 

"SPECIALIST IN RF CONNECTORS AND COAX" 



Part No. 

PL-259/U5A 
83- 1SP-1050 
B3822 
PV259/51 

UG-175 
UG-176 

UG-21EWU 
UG-218W 
9913/PIN 

UG-2I0/9913 
UG'21B;9913 
UG-146/U 
UG-B3.0J 



Description 
UHF Mate Phenolic, USA mate 
PL- 2 59 Phenolic, Amphenoi 
PL- 2 59 Teflon. Amphenoi 
UHF Male Silver Teflon. USA 
Reducer for RG- SB 
Reducer for RG-59& MINI 8 

N Male RG- B , 2 1 3. 2 1 A . Amphenoi 
NMaleRG-B, 213, 214. Kings 
N Male Pin for 93 13. 9086, 82 14 
fits lfG-2 1D/U & UG-218/U N'S 
N Male for RG-B with 39 13 Pin 
NMalefofRG^8with99l3Pin 
N Male to SO- 2 39. Teflon US A 
N Female to PL-259, Teflon USA 



"THIS LfST REPRESENTS ONLY A 
FRACTION OF OUR HUGE INVENTORY" 



Price 

$.50 

75 

1.45 

1.30 

-20 

20 

295 

3.75 

1.50 
395 
4.75 
5,00 

5.00 

^115 



THE R.R CONNECTION 

213 North Frederick Ave. #11 

Gaithersburg, MD 20877 

(301)840-5477 

PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

VISA. MASTERCARD. OR COD. 

UPS COD, ADD $2 00 PER ORDER 




1 



FLUXLESS ALUMINUM BRAZING WITH A 
PROPANE TORCH orOXYACETYLEME! 






<U1 

Q. 



BRAZE ALUMINUM AS THIN AS 
AN ALUMINUM BEVERAGE CAN! 

FABRICATE-flEP AIR-MAINTAIN — ALU- 
MINUM a ZINC ALLOYS — RADIO & TV 
LU | ANTENNAE - BOATS — BOAT PROPEL- 

LERS — AUTO RADIATORS — DIES — 
CRANK CASES — GRILLS — AJR CONDI- 
TIONING SYSTEMS - FARM & DAIRY 
EQUIPMENT — IRRIGATION PIPES — 
STORM WINDOWS & DOORS — LTEN- 

OSILS — HARDWARE — MODELS - MAY 
J BE NICKEL OR CHROME PLATED AFTER. 
BONDS COPPER TUBING TO ALUMINUM 
AND CAN BE USED TO MAKE REPEATER 
CAVITIES. - ONLY YOUR IMAGINATION 
LIMITS YOU TO ITS USES! 
THOUSANDS OF SATISFIED CUSTOMERS, 

TO ORDER 24 1 8" MIRACLE RODS* Send cteck or money order 
(or $20 S S3 shipping and handling (rn U.S.) to: MfRACLE ROD , 
Past Office Bo* 79 1 p Glasgow, KY 42141. VISA & MASTERCARD 
ACCEPTED (Give no andexp dale) 

UPS OflDEftS CANNOT Bt DELIVERED TO POST OFFICE BOXES, PLEASE GIVE 
ADDRESS WHEN ORDERING 



DC II 



IF THE BOD FAILS TO FLOW ON ALUMINUM, 
YOUR MONET G A C« GUARANTEED 

Mode in ihe USA 



li?f.l 



SPECIALISTS 

IN FAST TURN 

PC. BOARDS 



PROTO TYPE P. C. BOARDS 

AS LOW AS $25.00 

• SINGLE & DOUBLE SIDED 

• PLATE THROUGH HOLES 

• TEFLON AVAILABLE 

• PC. DESIGN SERVICES 

FOR MORE INFORMA TlON 

/Midland 
Technologies 



/T 



34374 EAST FRONTAGE ROAD -252 
BOZEMAN. MT5971 5 (406) 586-1 1 90 




NORTHEAST ELECTRONICS SUPPLY CO., INC. 
[WHITEHALL PENNSYLVANIA 

(40 miles north of Philadelphia) 

^7 




li ICOM 

Tisr 



N-TEC 



146.745 2m Repeater 
W3GQO, WB3EAN 
Bob& Diane Jones 
1952 Mac Arthur Road 
215-820-0112 



Guaranteed Repair Service 




We Chech 



^139 



UPGRADE 

AMATEUR 

RADIO LICENSE 

Let your computer test you before the 
license examination, FCC Amateur License 
Pool Questions. Complete multiple choice 
answers. Computer generated questions. 
Keeps running score (percentage) so you 
know how well you are doing, User friendly. 
For IBM PC/XT/ AT and PC "look atikes" 
using DOS 2.1+ also Apple II+, lle t & lie 
having 128K of memory using ProDos or 

Apple Dos 3.3* 

NOVICE $24,95 

TECH/GENERAL $34.95 

ADVANCE— $34.95 

EXTRA $34.95 

Each Sold Separately. Add $1 .50 for ship- 
ping 8l handling. Phone orders - Visa/MC. 
Illinois residents add 7% sales tax, 

DIAMOND SYSTEMSJNC. - 61 

Box 48301 N I LES P I L.60648 (312)763-1722 



THE MULTIPLE RECEIVER SOLUTION 




4 Channel Signal-to Noise Voler 

Expandable to 32 Channel by Just Adding Cards 

Continuous Vottng 

LEO Indicators ot COR and Voted Signals 

B wit-in Calibrator 

Remote Voted Indicators Pinned Out 

4«fc a B Dottle S;dRd Gold Plated 44 Pm CaTd 

Remote Disatole I rip uin 

MOftE 

Built, tested and calibrated with manual 

$350,00 



NEW PRODUCT 

Tefepharte interlace now available 
For more information call or write; 

HALL ELECTRONICS 

see Us Voter Department 

^ 815 E.Hudson Street 

Daytoni Columbus, Ohio 43211 

(614)261-8871 



^48 



MAKE CIRCUIT BOARDS 
THE NEW, EASY WAY 




WITH TEC-200 FILM 

JOST 3 EASY STEPS: 

Copy circuit pattern on TEC-200 film 
using any plain paper copier 
Iron film on to copper clad board 
Peel off film and etch 

convenient 8!£ x 11 size 

With Complete Instructions 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

5 Sheets for $3.95 1 Sheets only $535 

Add $L0G postage NY Res. add sa/e? tax 

The MEADOWLAKE Corp. 

DepL 73, P.O, Box 497 

EHorthport, New York 11768 ^55 



"When You Buy Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 99 



I 





























4 










ADVERTISERS 












h*5>,# 


page 


B.SJ 


page 


R\S.* 


page 


RSJ 


page 




279 


Ave Comm LiruCSftOns 


112 


99 


Computer Supplies of PelerboTO uah 


97 


International Radio 


93 


150 


The Radio Works 


64 




06 


AEA 


103 


11 


Computer Trader 


97 


2M 


Jensen Tools 


19 


34 


Ramsey Eteelfomcs 


4' 




1 


Advanced Compute* Controls, inc. 


43 


12 


Conned Systems, inc 


1 


272 


Jun's Electronics 


69 


208 


Regency Bsetranicf, he 


18 




143 


Advanced Computer Controls, inc 


45 


270 


Consolidated Eteciromes 


2 


* 


Kenwood 5. 6. 9. 


101. Cov rv 


115 


RFConoectfofi 


m 




144 


Advanced Computer Controls, Inc 


47 


*10 


Contact East 


19 


126 


The Lanz Company 


79 


260 


RF Connection 


39 




2S1 
194 


Aftronics 
Ai Electronics 


63 

at 


13 
264 


Crurntroncs . . 


49 
12 


1 

25 


The Laser Press 
Madeon Electronics 


75 
67 


142 


RF Enterprises 

RF PaitsAVestcom En^neenng 


113 




L/aiwa electronic ucripGiaEjon 




93 




V 


Amateur Etedromc Supply 


29 


«■ 


rrnflrti Ham-Com 


90 


47 


Maggiore Electromes 


63 


193 


Rooca Heseracn 


107 




4 


Amidon Assoc«res 


83 


■w 


Dayton Hamventioft 


11 


101 


Majrcpnxlnc 


97 


254 


Ross Distnfcutmg 


■ 




190 


Amp Supply SPECIAL INSERT 


60 


276 


Deia Loop Antenna 


23 


55 


Meadowiake Ccp 


99 


265 


Satman 


112 




361 


Antenna Specialists 
Antique BeclFonit Supply 


110 
49 


263 
103 


Demroa 
Dentronics 


54 

8 


209 
24 


Mercer Electrodes 


18 
3 




Moving 
Sutecnpt ions, 


99 




Mr J enterprises, inc 




17 




195 


0ptn 


49 


161 


Diamond Systems 


99 


207 


MFJ Enterprises. Inc. 


16 




Uncle Wayne's Bookshefres 


85 




■ 


ARRL 


110 


• 


Dick Smith Electronics 


71 


T62 


Michigan Radio 


69 


2T3 


Howard w Sams & Company 


19 




116 


AmotdCo 


69 


106 


Dtgitre* 


93 


26 


Micro Control Specialties 


lit 


192 


Shojrki Electronics 


75 




■ 


Associated Radio 


43 


TS 


Doppler Systems 


49 


179 


MicrotogCorp 


39 


■ 


Silicon Solutions 


47 




16 


AsironCrjfp 


51 


133 


EGE,?nc SPECIAL INSERT 


SS.59 


252 


M Idland Tech nologie 5 


99 


274 


Smiley Antenna 


97 




v 


Austin Amateur Radio Suppi> 


IS 


■ 


Encomrn. inc 


105 


148 


Mind's Eye 


•19 


69 


Spec-Com Journal 


93 




53 


Barkur A Williamson . 


B1 


• 


Engineering Consulting 


23 


120 


Miracle Rod . . 


99 


51 


Spectrum Communications Corp 


IS 




41 


Barry Electronics Carp 


53 


* 


Financial rreeoom Publishers 


,, 57 


91 


Wirage/KLM 


91 


183 


Spectrum International 


69 




42 


BilatCa, 


■VJ 


58 


Fa* -Tango 


. . 31 


80 


Missouri Radio Center 


116 


« 


Spider Antennas 


66 




275 


Bird Electronics 


.. 26 


17 


GLB Electronics 


61 


71 


Monitoring Times 


64 


* 


Success Business Publishers 


35 




102 


8 nr>cornm Technology 


79 


72 


Glen Martin Engineering 


, 79 


127 


Mot ran Electronics 


49 


77 


Technical Sysiems Grojp 


98 




90 


Brlti'sS-Way Radio 


111 


273 


GordOh West Radio School 


110 


198 


MulT^a;-; 


64 


189 


TenasComm Center 


109 




156 


Quckmnsler Publishing 


9S 


271 


H.J, Theiler Corp7Sommer 




151 


Naval Electronics 


71 


277 


Texas Radio Products 


66 




92 


Burghardt 


113 




Electric Co 


65 


130 


Nei-Tech Labs. Inc 


71 


190 


Triangle inter national Towers 


54 




267 


Cable Distributors 


63 


17S 


H.il TroniK 


64 


50 


Nernal Electronics 


96 


IB"! 


Trans-Com 


49 




259 


California Packet Concepts 


65 


m 


Paul HaJe 


66 


139 


Northeast Bectromcs 


99 


199 


Transieierontc 


75 




• 


CBC Inter national 


75 


48 


Hall Electronics 


99 


167 


Onpn HiTech 


99 


* 


Tn-H Communication* 


12 




262 


Certified Communicaiions 


75 


* 


The Ham Station 


37 


28 


PC Electronics 


95 


136 


Unadrfta/ Antennas Etc 


66 




68 


CESJnc 


106 


» 


Hamtfomcs, Inc 


77 


260 


ThePKShack 


25 


104 


Un iversal Amateur Radio 


75 




123 
46 


CESJnc 
Charge-Rite 


114 
61 


18 
109 


Heath Co 
Hed Sound 


115 
71 


152 
178 


Pac-Comm . . 


V00 


79 

* 


Vanguard Lairs 

l i j — — ■■ - _ w i. . . J. ,. 


49 




Pacific Caiwe Go. 


73a 




Western BeCt'OniCs 


49 




157 


Cleveland Institute 


71 


110 


Hed Sound 


75 


177 


Pakmw Engineers 


49 


138 


Westlnk Repotl 


S 




45 


CooiaJ Dynamics 


45 


■ 


Home Business Opportunities 


73 


278 


PaJomar Engineers 


115 


* 


WAams Ratio 


75 




174 


Colorado Comrn. Center 


109 


269 


Hustler, inc 


6 


257 


Paufcroncs 


96 


38 


W94NN Antennas 


54 




149 


Com West Ratio Systems 


75 


* 


KXW America, Inc 


Cov II 56 


212 


OSKYPubfaiwjg 


19 


165 


YaesuElectJorwa 


Cov IN 




m 


Commynicaiions Specialists 


13 


* 


COM America. Inc 




290 


Quay Tectvwtagy 


83 


206 


Taesu Elect/ortics 


18 




35 


Comprad 


31 




SP€OAL INSERT 


57 


51 


Rate Amateur CaAbook Inc 


112 


- FV»£ Spflttpond 'Mfc tr*» C4ri4**r4'V*% 








Pac-Comm 

DR-100 
SINGLE-PORT 




The Pac-Comm DR 100 and DR 200 
are packet radio digipeater controllers 
which have been especially designed 
for dedicated repeater service. The 
DR-100 provides single-port controller 
capability at low cost. It is well-suited 
to any application where a single* 
frequency digipeater is required. 

The DR-200 is a duat-port controller, 
capable of digipeating on two separate 
Frequencies and able to switch pack- 
ets between ports, ft is a basic net- 
work building block. 

TECH LINE 

(813) 874-2980 



SOFTWARE OPTIONS 

DR-100 Single-Port Software 
-AX.25 Level 3 Switch 
-AX.25 Level 2 Digipeater 

DR 200 Dual Port Software 
-AX.25 Level 3 Switch 
KE3Z Dual Port Digipeater 
-Southern California Dual-Port 
-Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) 

Amateur Net Price Schedule 



DR-100 
DR-200 



Kit Assembled 
$ 84.95 $ 99.95 
$139.95 $159.95 



DR-200 
DUAL-PORT 

Both digipeaters use a Z 80 pro- 
cessor which has up to 32k bytes of 
EPROM and two JEDEC sockets for 
2/§/16/32k bytes of battery backed 
RAM- Packet HDLC operations are 
handled in hardware by a Zitog 8530 
SCC. Both use the AMD 7910 LSI 
modem chip. Each modem channel 
has a standard disconnect header and 
time-out timer. The CPU itself has a 
hardware watchdog timer and exter- 
nal hard reset line. The circuit board 
is RFI shielded by our extruded 
alumimum case. All connections are 
soldered to feedthroughs. 

Write For Free Packet Catalog. 



ORDER DIRECT 800-223-3511 FREE UPS BROWN 




"HV»C<1'(> 



Pac-Comm Packet Radio Systems, 3652 West Cypress St., Tampa, FL 33607 



100 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 




V 






...pacesetter in Amateur radio 



HF to Microwaves! 



I O" D I U 40, 15, 10, and 6-meter all mode "Quad Bander 11 



Keyboard selection of 
frequency, as well as 
nraditJonar VFO 



80 memory channels 
store frequency, band, 
mode data 



All-mode squelch, noise 
blanker. RF attenuator 



Optional general coverage 
unrt, voice synthesizer. 
FM unit, IF filters 




TR-50 



12 GHz FM transceiver 



The perfect portable 
for microwave 
mountain-topping! 

• 1 watt output 

• LCD frequency readout 
with S & RF power meter 

• 5 memory channels 



Odd split on memory 
channel 5 

Includes: Battery set P 
charger, external power 
cable, 16- key DTMF hand 
microphone, sleeve 
antenna with adjustable 
mount, shoulder strap. 



TM-21W411A 

The compact mobiles with "flexibility" 



• 5 channel memory 

• 25 watts high, 5 watts 
low (adjustable) 



7-positfon, tilting 
control panel 
• DCS— Digital Coded 
Squelch selective calling 
system 
• GaAs FET front end for 
superior reception 




:omptem itne ot accessories is avatiabte for these transceivers 

csffans ana a/jces subject to cnange wntioui nottce ar obligation 
mpiew service manuals are available for alt TriQ-Kenwootf Transceivers and most accessories 



KENWOOD 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 West Walnut Street 

Comptan, California 90220 




THE BARGAIN SHEET 

ALWAYS THE BEST DEALS! 



5 1 4 DISK FILE 

5 1 4 DISK FILE 60XL 

5 I 4 DISK FILE 10 

5 1 4 DISK FILE 10-3PK 
3.5 DISK FILE 30 
3.5 DISK FILE 30 XL 



$972 

Si 1.02 
$3,22 

$8 42 
$9 07 

$10.37 



MAXELL 

MD1 
MD2 

MFlDD 
MF2DD 

BASF 



$11 75 VM 3102VG 12" HI RES 

$14.95 GREEN COMPOSITE 

$24.70 VM 31Q2VA 12" HI RES 

$2995 AMBER COMPOSITE 

VM3101VG 13" GREEN 
COMPOSITE 



Si 1.67 
$10,37 



KALMAR 

TEAK ROLLTOP t(452 3 5 \45\ $15.57 
TEAK ROLL TOP #453 3.5 (90) 524.67 
TEAK ROLL TOP 8454 5 25 (50) $21 42 
TEAK ROLL TOP 8455 5.25 (100] $31 95 
TEAK ROLL TOP 1*456 5.25 (110* $35-72 



FLEXI 1D5PK 
1 D5.25 5S DD 

2D5 25DSDD 
2HD5.25DS'DD 

OPUS 

5.25 DS DD 



$11.95 
$11.25 

£25.98 



VM31Q1VA 12" AMBER 

COMPOSITE 
CM 3631 1 1D 14" COLOR EGA 



$8710 
$516.95 



BROTHER 



10 PK $6.88 



PAPER 

9 1 2^11 tt20 1000 CS 
a 1 2x11 820 2500 SH 
GREENBAR 1PT3500SH 

AVERY 



$14.9-5 
$26.95 
$37.95 



ANCHOR AUTOMATION 

SIGNAL MODEMS 



o 



o 



o 



4166 CONT INDEX CD 3*5 |500| $6.47 
4146 ADDRESS LBL 

4*17 16(1 000 1 Sfi.47 

41 62 CLEAR LABELS 

3 1 2*15 16 $10.20 

4144 3 UP£ 1 2x15 16 fSOOOf $917 
4143 2 UP 4*15 16 <3000| $8.52 

4145 3 1 2*15 16(1000| $4.74 
4170 LIST & MAIL $35.97 
4164 DISSAPERF PAPER $4.22 
4169 3*5 INDEX CARD (500) $7.46 
416621 16*4 INDEX CD {5001 $647 

41 64 PIGGYBACK LABELS (500) 7 47 

4165 COMPUTER PAPER [25Q| $3.89 

4167 POS CARDS (250) $7.77 

COMTECH 

CT 100 P A-B SWITCH BOX 



SM 1 LEGHTNING 24 
SM II EXPRESS 
SM 3 ERROR FREE 
SMS SECURE 12 

ANCHOR 

VM 2 VOLKSMINI 
VM 6420 VOLKS 6420 
VM 6470 VOLKS 6470 
VM 12 VOLKSMODEM 12 
VM 1 VOLKSMODEM 
F & J CABLE 
ALL OTHER CABLES 



5389,35 
5289.35 
$12935 

$324,35 



$129.35 

$129.35 

$129.35 

$194.35 

$51.96 

$25.97 

$8.42 



$374.25 

$35925 
5399.00 
$681.85 

$841 .75 
$841 .75 

5249.00 
S224.25 



CT 100 S A-B SWITCH BOX 
CT 312 PARALLEL CABLE 6' 
CT 329 SERIAL COPY 

PRINT STANDS 

CURTIS PS i 
ALLSOP PS 1 



$51.96 
551.96 

$19.47 

$15.60 



$14,95 
$1 2.97 






SYSTEM STANDS 

CURTIS SS 3 SYSTEM STAND $19.47 
THOMSON 1214 SWIVEL BASE $19 50 

BOARD PRODUCTS 

VIDEO 7 



VEGA EGA 



SURGE PROTECTION 



CURTIS 

SP 1 DIAMOND PLUS $40,26 

SP-2 EMERALD $45.46 

SP-3 SAFE STRiP $19.95 

SPF-1 SAPPHIRE $51.97 

SPF-2 RUBY $53.47 

SPF-2+ RUBY PLUS $71.46 

SP 1 DIAMOND £37.46 

MONITORS 

THOMSON 

CM 31 311 HIRES12" RGB 
CM 36432 14" RGB 
CM 36382 14" RGB 
CM 31481 12" RGB 
COMPOSITE 
CM 36512 14" RGB 

VIDEO COMPOSITE 



HR 20 LETTER QUALITY 
M-1409 DOT MATRIX 
Ml 509 DOT MATRIX 
HR 35 LETTER QUALITY 
2024L DOT MATRIX 
TWfNWRlTER 5 
HR 10 LETTER QUALITY 
M1 109 DOT MATRIX 
CF 100 CUT SHEET FEEDER $194.35 
CF 300 CUT SHEET FEEDER $211 25 
CF 150 CUT SHEET FEEDER 5194.35 
TF 150 TRACTOR FEED 
TF 100 TRACTOR FEED 
TF 300 TRACTOR FEED 
KB 50 KEYBOARD 50 
KB 100 KEYBOARD 150 
SF 30 SHEET FEED 
SRL 14 

IFI 232 INTERFACE 
LO 100 FONT BOARD 
LO 200 FONT BOARD 
SF 40 SHEET FEED 
SF 200 SHEET FEED 
3010 LIFT OFF TAPE 
7010 LIFT OFF TAPE HR 

7020 CORRECTABLE 

7021 MULTI STRIKE 

7022 ONE TIME CARBON 
7030 MULTI STRIKE 
6020 FABRIC 

8030 FABRIC TWIN WRITER 

9010 FABRIC RIBBON 

9020 2G24L 

9030 FABRIC RIBBON 
9040 RIBBON 



$109.85 
$109.85 
$10985 
$143.00 
$194.35 
£91 .00 
£29.22 
$32.47 
$48.72 
$64.97 
$96.85 
£259.36 
$695 
$6.95 
$3.22 
$3.79 
$2.98 
$12.31 
$3.22 
$18.62 
$2.76 
$6.44 
S7.95 
S8.95 




$408,85 
5324,35 
$356 85 

$2 91. as 



$389.35 



S278.85 



STAR MICRONICS 

SD 1 DOT MATRIX PRINTER $364.50 
LV 1210 DOT MATRIX 

PRINTER 5189.00 

NB 15 DOT MATRIX 

24PINHEAD 51044.90 

NX 10 DOT MATRIX SCALL' 

SD10WIDECARRIDGE 



O' 



MONOGRAPHIC MGA 
MONOGRAPHIC PLUS 



5162 47 VM 31Q7IG 12" GREEN 

$194.97 MONOCHROME 

VM3102IA 12" AMBER 
MONOCHROME 



$12935 

$109,85 



DOT MATRIX 
SP15WIDECARRIDGE 
DOT MATRIX 




$492.32 
$582.08 




For orders caff Toll Free! 

1-800-843-6700 

Ash for extension "M" 



The information Hot Line 

1-603-525-42O1 

For questions & other items 



'99 



COMPUTER SUPPLIES OF PETERBOROUGH 

200-A Perimeter Rd/Dept M, Manchester, NH 03103 

FOR ORDERS BY MAIL 



NAME 



PHONE, 



SIGNATURE 



ADDRESS 



MCc VISA p 



EXPIRATION DATE. 



Put More Punch 



COME SEE US AT THE DA YTON HAMVENTION 



in Your Packet 



Outstanding mechanical design 
makes the IsoPole the only logical 
choice for a VHF base station, 
especially for Packet operation. All 
Isopole antennas yield the maximum 
gain attainable for their respective 
lengths and a maximum signal on the 
horizon. Exceptional decoupling from 
the feed line results in simple tuning 
and a significant reduction in TVI 
potential. The IsoPole antennas are 
all impedance matched in the factory 
so that no field tuning is required. The 
IsoPoies have the broadest frequency 
coverage of any comparable VHF 
base station antenna. This means no 
loss of power output from one end of 
the band to the other, when used with 
SWR protected solid state 
tranceivers. Typical SWR is 1.4 to t or 
better across the entire band. 

A standard 50 Ohm SO-239 connec- 
tor is recessed within the base sleeve 
(fully weather protected). With the 
IsoPole you will not experience ag- 
gravating deviation in SWR with 
changes in weather The impedance 
matching network is weather sealed 
and designed for maximum legal 
power. The aerodynamic cones are 
the only appreciable wind load and 
are attached directly to the support (a 
standard TV mast which is not sup- 
plied). 



IsoPole Specifications 

Model 

Freq. Coverage (Mhz) 

2.1 VSWR bandwidth 

Power Rating 

Gain** 

Radiating Element Length 

Amateur Net Price 




High Performance Hand-Held Anten- 
na — The Hot Rod 

The Hot Rod antenna can be ex- 
pected to make the same improve- 
ment to hand-held communications 
that the IsoPole antennas have made 
to base station operation, Achieve 1 or 
2 db gain over ANY 5/8 wave two 
meter telescopic antenna. The factory 
tuned HFM is 20% shorter, lighter and 
places far less stress on your hand- 
held connector and case. It will easily 
handle over 25 watts of power, making 
it an excellent emergency base or 
mobile antenna. In the collapsed posi- 
tion, the Hot Rod antenna will perform 
like a helical quarter wave. Three Hot 
Rods are available; HFM 1/2 wave 2M 
Ant, HR-2 for 220 Mhz, and HR-4 for 
440 Mhz. Amateur Net Price on all Hot 
Rods is $19.95. 

For either base station or hand-held 
operation AEA has the perfect 
VHF/UHF antenna. Put more punch in 
your Packet station with an AEA 
IsoPole or Hot Rod antenna. To order 
your new antenna contact your 
favorite Amateur Radio Distributor, 
For more information contact Advanc- 
ed Electronic Applications, P.O. Box 
C-2160, Lynnwood, WA 98036, or call 
206-775-7373. 



144 220 440 

135-160 210-230 415-465 
>12Mhz @ 146Mhz )15Mhz @ 220Mhz >22Mhz @ 435Mhz 

1 kw 1 kw 1 kw 

3 dbd 3 dbd 3 dbd 

125.5" (3.2m) 79-25" (2m) 46" (1 .2m) 

$49.95 $49.95 $69.95 



* * 



dbd — db gain over a dipole in free space 



Prices and Specifications subject to change without notice or obligation. 



AEA 



Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 



,-65 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 103 




INTERNATIONAL 



NOTES FROM FN42 

Correction: In Half Beyer 
DJ3NW's report on the beacon 
robot, IY4M (February, 1987), the 
bandwidth of the receiver should 
have read: "about ± 250 Hz," 
and NOT ± 2590 Hz, 

Welcome to Djurica Maletin 
YU7DR, writing from the Socialist 
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, 
and inviting hams to come work 
from YU: '*. . a very nice country 
[with the] blue sunny Adriatic, 
high mountains. . .national food 
[which] is very tasteful and wine 
pleasant to dhnk. Our people are 
always hospitable. " Only a sam- 
ple of information this month. 

This seems to be the month for 
royal birthdays, including one for 
the "King of Code, n Samuel F.8. 
Morse (April 27, 1 79 11 In your DX- 
ing, remember to send birthday 
congratulations for the Queen of 
Denmark (18th), the Emperor of 
Japan (29th), and the King of Swe- 
den (30th). The 30th is also 
Queen's Day in the Netherlands, 
ft is Independence Day in Senegal 
on the 4th and in Zimbabwe on the 
18th; Republic Day in Sierra 
Leone is on the 19th and National 
Day in Chad is on the I3th t which 
also is New Year's Day in Ban- 
gladesh. The 14th is Pan Ameri- 
can Day (Dia de las Americas). 
And XYLs t the 7th is Womens Day 
in Mozambique. It is World Health 
Day everywhere on April 7, so 
wish everyone, everywhere the 
best of health in mind and body! 
After all, one of the four basic rea- 
sons radio amateurs are licensed 
is To Foster International Good- 
will! 

ROUNDUP 

Japan. We were pleased to re- 
ceive a letter from Shozo Hara 
JAf AN, president of the Japan 
Amateur Radio League (JARL), 
promising this column amateur ra- 
dio information from Japan from 
time to time. An international 
column in a ham radio publication 
without any input from Japan is 
ridiculous! We hope to do a better 
job than we did a few years ago, 

HAMBIT. Billed as the "First In- 
ternational Congress on Amateur 
Radio and Computers,'' HAMBIT 
was held in Florence, Italy, last 
November HAMBIT '87 wjII be on 
November 22; details are under 
the Italian flag, below, since the 



Assoc iazione Radioamatori Ital- 
ian! (ARl) sponsors it. 

Diego Garcia. Bill Poulm 
KA4WWG/MM writes to encour- 
age hams to bring their equipment 
M for a DXpedition for 12 months 
that they will never believe. JH Well, 
first you join the Navy, . . Diego 
Garcia is a U.S. Navy support and 
communications facility in the 
middle of the Indian Ocean (V09) 
Using the club station, an ICOM 
745 and a TH7 beam up about fifty 
feet, '"the bands are realty fun to 
work." he writes. He worked 
Guam, the Malaysian Peninsula. 
Europe, and a few stateside sta- 
tions. Futl operating privileges 
are yours "regardless Of current 
stateside license. More info on 
Diego Garcia is available by writ- 
ing: Station Manager, Diego Gar- 
cia QSL Bureau, Box 15, NAV- 
SUPPFAC, Fleet Post Office, San 
Francisco C A 96685. 

Africa. "By the early part of the 
next century virtually the whole of 
mankind should be brought within 
easy reach of a telephone/' 

That was an objective set by the 
Independent Commission for 
World Wide Telecommunications 
Development, which led to the 
"Arusha [Tanzania) Declaration,*' 
which led to discussions about 
African Telecommunications De- 
velopment by the pan-African 
telecommunications network 
(PANAFTEL), A common strategy 
Is to be developed for extensions 
ot current cooperative efforts in 
the fields of training, research and 
development, purchasing policy, 
maintenance, tariffs, and the in- 
ternational development priorities 
for the continent. (Excerpted from 
the December ITU Telecommuni- 
cations Journal, the magazine of 
the International Telecommunica- 
tions Union). Talk about chal- 
lenges' 

(The ITU— for readers new to 
this column— is an autonomous 
organization, with functional rela- 
tionships with the United Nations, 
located in Geneva, and with a 
membership of 159 nations. Its 
function is to set up international 
regulations of radio, telegraph, 
telephone, and space radio-com- 
munications, and allocate radio 
frequencies. The magazine has a 
hisiory a bit longer than that of the 
United Nations. The December is- 
sue includes this t from the Journal 
Tefegraphique for December, 



1886: "The Imperial Telegraph 
Administration of Brazil has re- 
cently opened a telegraph office 
in the quarantine station of llha 
Grande to the South of Rio de 
Janeiro." (A new DX country?) 

A new plan for FM broadcasting 
in band II, to go into effect July 1, 
this year, was drawn up in 1 984 for 
the whole of Region 1 (Africa and 
Europe, including all of the USSR, 
Turkey, and the Arab countries of 
the Middle East) and Afghanistan 
and the Islamic Republic of Iran 
from Region 3. In Nairobi recently, 
a new plan was drawn up for tele- 
vision broadcasting in the fre- 
quency bands I, III. IV, and V. A 
report on that will be in this 
column in the future. 

World. Better and faster: That's 
the word for what will be available 
by 1990 for communications 
across the Atlantic and Pacific 
Oceans with fiber-optics— glass 
fibers and laser beams in under- 
water cables. Audio quality will be 
superior to both the present cop- 
per cable system and satellite sys- 
tem—and faster than via satellite 
since Earth-bound channels are 
45,000 miles shorter. The Atlantic 
cable js scheduled for operation 
next year and the Pacific, the year 
after, 




FRANCE 

Chuck Martin F/AB4Y 
American Embassy Pahs 
APO NY 09777 

A veritable explosion of packet 
radio activity is underway in the 
French Republic Remy F6ABJ, 
the "gun** 1 of packet, said thai his 
company had originally built 200 
boards for packet. The demand 
has been so great that 600 units 
have been built and the demand is 
still increasing. He has started the 
association called ATEPRA; there 
are about 190 in the Paris area 
that are active in packet. 

The propagation characteris- 
tics on 14 MHz are such that only 
one 20-minute window opens 
each day where communications 
with the USA are possible. 

Three frequencies are used 
for packet communications in 
Europe: 144. 67S (primary). 
144.650 (secondary), and 
166.625 (tertiary). These frequen- 
cies were chosen arbitrarily, and 
while they have proven adequate 
in their own right, it is difficult 
or impossible to co-locate a 
digipeater with an FM repeater, 



due to heterodyning and desensi- 
tization. 

Packet radio is not addressed in 
the French amateur radio regula- 
tions, There is a m<xius vivendi 
wherein amateurs may operate 
packet legally. There is no 220- 
MHz allocation in Europe, so 
plans are underway to cross-link 
digipeaters on 430 MHz. In the fu- 
ture, there will be a 50-MHz alloca- 
tion in France. 

Paris has two active digipeat- 
ers: FTKAL and F6ABJ-2. They 
permit a Paris station to work sta- 
tions within a 125-km radius. I 
have connected with stations from 
Rouen to Orleans. There are two 
active PBBS systems operating: 
F6ASJ and F5LO. Another digi- 
peater will soon appear: FF6KEV. 
The future looks very bright for 
packet in France, with new sta- 
tions appearing every day. 

Reciprocal licenses for foreign- 
ers are now made "over the coun- 
ter" m France, The Republic has 
reciprocal operating treaties in 
force with some 30 nations. A 90- 
day permit can be had for a fee of 
FF 42 [SO- 16 per French Franc as 
of 1 /27/87J, and a one-year permit 
costs FF 1 50. 



] 



GREECE 

Manos Darkadakis SV1/W 
Box 23051 
11210 Athens 
Greece 

I would like to welcome the re- 
turn of Wayne Green to the mag- 
azine! Since this column is written 
months before it appears, it may 
look a little old, but it is necessary 
to say because, even though I 
don't know Wayne Green in per- 
son, I think this was the best thing 
happening to the magazine for the 
last two years. Since I also believe 
that everybody has to be in proper 
position, I am glad to see W2NSD 
back in charge of 73. 

THE ABEPD0 

Last July you may have heard a 
strange caiisign, SX1MBA, on the 
air for seven days, working the 
pileups all day and all night long 
This call had been given to the 
Radio Amateur Association of 
Greece (RAAG) during the cele- 
bration of Navy Week. The station 
was in the radio room of the 
Memorial Battleship Abepoop, 
that is where the MBA suffix came 
from. Here is the story t from re- 
cent Greek history: 



104 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



WELZ CORP 



© THL CORP. 



LOADS • WATTMETERS I AMPLIFIERS • COUPLERS 











V SANTEC 




THE MOST POPULAR HAM RADIO ACCESSORIES 
are available from WELZ WELZ brand easy- 
to-read power and VSWR 
meters and other high 
quality station accessories 
are used world-wide. 
WELZ, good enough to 
be the best 



THL THE INDUSTRY LEADER IN DESIGN AND 
PERFORMANCE add-on accessory VHF/UHF 

amplifiers, antenna couplers 

and now HF LIN EARS too. 

When power out is 

your problem, stop 

in for the THL 

brand solution. 



COMPACT MOBILES MAKE FULL DUPLEX POSSIBLE KDK 
mobile radios are so small, TWO of them will fit In the space 
normally accomodating one full size mobile radio. This al- 
lows for full duplex cross band operation with 32 memory ca- 
pacity, plus many other advantages. Check out the FM-240 
(VHF) and the FM-74Q(UHF} loday. 




#)KEIMPRO 



ROTORS • ACCESSORIES 



WHEN YOU TURN YOUR ANTENNA, 

DO IT WITH KENPRO antenna aiming 

devices and accessories. From light to 

heavy-duty there's a KENPRO for you. NEW 

Satellite tracking AZ-EL units with external computer 

controller interface. 



LOOK CLOSELY AND YOU WILL CHOOSE SANTEC. 
Santec hand helds are truly the BEST value + quality + 
performance combination available today. A Full 5 Watts 
output, Multi-mode Scan, 10 Memories and AUTO- 
DIALER make the SANTEC a fantastic handheld radio. 
Try one yourself at your next trip to your favorite Ham 
Radio Shop. 








1506 CAPITAL AVENUE, PLANO, TEXAS 75074 PHONE • 214 423*0024 Gilt FAX - 214-423-OOfil 
NATIONAL DISTRIBUTION FOR SANTEC - KDK ■ KENPRO - THL • WELZ DIAMOND 



— 



- 




The 1980 SVWC/SVHW/SVUG operation on the back balcony of the 
Monastery, with aU equipment 

* 



After the signing of a peace 
agreement between Greece, Ser- 
bia, Bulgary, and Montenegro on 
November 20, 1912, Turkey was 
starting to prepare an expedition 
to the Aegean Sea to defeat the 
Greek navy and occupy Greek 
islands. 

This was noticed by a Greek 
squadron, and the fleet began to 
patrol on the Dardanellia Sea to 
watch for the Turks. Action began 
December 3 when the Turkish 
fleet came along the strait. The 
Abepuxp, with a speed of over 20 
mph, left the Greek fleet and cir- 
cled around and attacked the 
Hank of the Turkish fleet, firing 
many successful shots. As the 
rest of the Greek fleet came up 
under cover of the fire from the 
guns of the Abepoxp, the Turkish 
fleet retreated, In less than three 
hours the fight was over: It was a 
victory by almost just one ship! 

3X1 MBA ran on this ship, the 
AbefxoQ, for seven days On all 
bands and all modes. There were 
HF stations as well as VHF tor the 
local people. RAAG equipment 
was used; lots of other SV1s of- 
fered tuners, power supplies, 
keyers, switches, and even key- 
boards for RTTY. Simple dipole 
antennas were used on all bands, 
and special attention had been 
paid on CW and the low frequen- 
cies- By the end of the week* 
9,000 QSOs had been logged. 

A nice-looking QSL card with a 



photo of the ship was developed. 
as well as a special award for 1 
IRCs. from RAAG's Award Man* 
ager. Those who have already ap- 
plied should have them by now [in 
March). 

MT, ATHOS AGAIN 

By the time you read this, you 
should have heard about a new 
failed attempt to activate ML 
Athos. last August, by an Italian 
group. I won't go into detail (al- 
though I know many details) since 
it was covered in this column be- 
fore, and I do not want to bore you . 
[November, 1986. issue; but here 
is a picture we did not use in that 
issue. ) Also, the circumstances of 
this attempt were not so different 
except for one thing: This time, 
the Italian group made sure to 
leave very few chances to anyone 
coming along later for a try. Now 
for those who still need this rare 
country, things aren't so easy and 
only time will ten who is to be 
blamed about it, DL7FT and the 
Italian group may have shut the 
doors of Ml. Athos forever* 

In the meanwhile, work anyone 
you hear claiming to be from there 
and worry later about its validity. 

Medical Administration Radio, 
station J4MAR, was established 
recently in Greece in order to give 
medical help to those who need it, 
RAAG is providing- QSL service 
for its members completely free of 
charge. 




At HAMBIT '86, left to right: Mario I5WBJ, Clelia ISICY, Mr. Giant, Mr. 
Spina and Mr. Poll of the Italian Telecommunications Ministry, Carlo 
I5CLC, Marco I5ZMH, Cesare I5TGC, Mario I5DEX, and Francesco 
I5IGQ. 




ITALY 

Further information on H AMBIT 
may be obtained by sending an 
SAE and IRCs for an airmail 
stamp with your request to Carlo 
Luigi Ciapetti 15CLC, Via Trieste 
36, 50139 Florence, Italy, 

Florence, Italy, the "Capital of 
European Culture/' played host 
to 250 representatives of the high- 
tech world on Sunday, November 
23rd last year, thanks to the spon- 
sorship of ARI, the Italian Tele- 
communications Ministry, EX- 
POSER (one of Italy's big fairs), 
and the Florence Savings Bank 
(Cassa di Risparmio Firenze), Pa- 
pers were presented by represen* 
tatives of Germany, the Nether- 
lands. Sweden, Switzerland, and 
Italy, on subjects ranging from 
dedicated software through digital 
modulation and application and 
data radio transmission, to data 
security . A general overview of the 
field was presented, from the lat- 
est high-tech developments to 
current research into the high 
tech of the future. Carlo I5CLC, 
president of the Florence branch 
of ARI, organized and coordinat- 
ed HAMBIT '86. 

Presiding at the opening ses- 
sion was University of Florence 
Professor Vito Cappellint, director 
of the Italian Institute for Radio 
Wave Research; welcome was ex- 
tended by the President of the Ital- 
ian Republic, Francesco Cossiga 
I0FCG. 

HAMBIT '67, to be on Sunday, 
November 22 s this year, will focus 
on PC-compatibte hardware and 
software for amateur radio. 




REPUBLIC OF KOREA 

Our guest columnist, Byong-joo 
Cho HL5AP: 




Not having heard from our Ko- 
rean correspondent, HL1AFP, for 
several months, here is a guest 
appearance to fill in for him. 

You may be surprised to re- 
ceive this letter from an unknown 
Korean amateur radio operator, 
but I got your name and address 
from the KARL DX News (the offi- 
cial bulletin of the Korean Ama- 
teur Radio League) [in which 73 
said it would welcome news]. I am 
a charter and life member of 
KARL since it was organized way 
back in 1955, 

I wish to be a news supplier for 
you. I am retired from the EL8AP/ 
MM last June (Sanke Steamship 
Company, Tokyo) and was ex- 
HM1AP, HM9AP, HM5AP, ELGP/ 
MM, PA9SR, HM5AP/DL, and 
YB0ZAA/HL5AP, My amateur 
class is 1st Class Amateur (same 
as top class in W), and I am QRV 
on all bands/modes with 2 meter, 
and a keen award hunter and 
DXer, 



106 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 









I 
I 
I 




YOU ALREADY OWN 75% OF A 
COLOR VIDEO STATION 

It's true. With your transceiver, antenna, television set and 
audio tape recorder, you already have 75% of what's 

required to receive and send __ m 

color video world-wide! 




[m-jM 
ROBOT| Video Transceiver 

and your station is complete. 

Thousands of amateur video operators around the world are 
exchansing beautiful color images every day. Whether your 
favorite mode is SSB or FM or AM— direct, via repeater or 

satellite-youcanjoinin 



the high-tech fun with- 
out modifying your 
present equipment Just 
add a Robot to your 



| ROBOT 




Please send me the following Robot equipment. I understand that if lam 
disatisfied for any reason, I can return the unit and receive a full refund. 

□ 1200C high resolution video transceiver $1295 

□ 450C standard resolution 5795 

□ 400C upgrade kit S395 

□ More Information 



Kame, 



Call. 



ROBOT RESEARCH, INC 

7591 Convoy Court 

San Diego, California 95111 

Phone (619)279-9430 



Address. 
Crty 



Z'P, 



i 

i 



DCOD 

□ Enclosed check or money order $_ 

DMCD VISA * 



Exp, Date: 



^ 193 



I am chairman for the Korea 
DXer Society, established in 1960 
with HL9KK8, etc, and we issue 
the WAK award to hams and 
SWLs + I am at PO Box 4, Haeurv 
dae. Pusan, Korea 607-04. 

I am QRV on 14 MHz CW every 
day around 2300-0200 UTC, and 
0600-0800 UTC 1 4 MHz CW for 
DXing. I should like to OSO every* 
one. spread out all over the world. 
My GSL manager is Hideke Nishi- 
da JH4NPP, PO Box 229, Okaya- 
ma P Japan 700. !t is OK via JARL/ 
JH4NPP or my QTH also. 

My two sons are also hams; 
HL5QU and HL5BDE. who is the 
main engineer on the M/S Spring 
Swift under a Liberian bulk carrier 
[flag]. He hopes to operate EL©??/ 
MM soon if he can get a license 
from the Liberian government, 

I was chief radio operator for the 
Sanke Line , and once was a flight 
radio operator and communica* 
tions manager for an airline, with 
5,000 hours of flying time, I was a 
radio engineer in Saigon during 
the Vietnam war. 

it didn 't surprise us to hear from 
HL5AP—We hear more and more 
from hams alt around the world. 
But we bet it will surprise HL5AP 
to see parts of his fetter here! 
When space is available* we enjoy 
sharing our mail. Write us, and 



maybe you'll be surprised, too. 
Maybe we 'It start a new small sec- 
tion— international Ham Of The 
Month— and select one letter from 
an overseas ham each month. 




MEXICO 

Mark Toutjian XE 1MKT 
Apartado Postal 42-046 
06470 - Mexico, D.F, 

GOOD NEWS FROM MEXICO 

More than a year has gone by 
since the big Mexico City earth- 
quake. Bad memories were 
brought back once again with the 
recent El Salvador earthquake, 
but Mexican hams were quick to 
respond to the needs of our 
friends "south of our border." 

I cooperated with a local cultur- 
al group near my home which was 
able to send, from Mexico City, a 
10-ton truck with supplies to 
friends in San Salvador. The cus- 
toms officials at both borders 
{Mexico/Guatemala and Guate- 
mala^! Salvador) were outstand- 
ingly organized and helped us 
through with no red tape. But how 
was it possible for us to find out 






THE 



H 




Exclusive Design for Mobile Radios 




CES 800 STANDARD FEATURES 

* Half and full duplex capable 

* Sack lit positive action keyboard 

* Adjustable levels for any radio 

* Audibfe sidetone * Automatic ftt 

* Auto microphone mute 

* Off-hook speaker mute 

* Orvhook diahng 

CES 800 OPTIONAL FEATURES 

* Auto dial of 21 digit numbers 

* Programmable dial speed changes, and 
pauses with or withoul FTT 

* Last number re-dtal 

• Decode oplions including — latched call 
light, audible alert, horn relay output 



Make The 
Connection 

CALL US *OW> TOO. 




F9MM — t UQIZ7 f9H 



Commurn cat ions Electronics Specialties, Inc. 
8Q3C Sl Orlando Avenue 
Winler Park, Florida 3Z7B9 




A new ham flies high! XElXJX with his wife and daughter, XE1MKT and 
his wife, XE1RBT, are behind. 



the needs of our friends down 
south— since there was little or no 
telephone communication into El 
Salvador for some time? 

You guessed it! If it wasn't for 
my ham equipment, we wouldn't 
have known that our friends need- 
ed more than a thousand sheets 
of galvanized roofing, literally tons 
of food, blankets, medicine, and 
other necessary items. 

After the trucks had arrived, 
what a pleasure it was to hear 
Dominic, in San Salvador, all 
choked up on the air. trying to 
thank us for all that was done. 

Yes, ham radio had done it 
again! 

THE JOY OF HAM RADIO 

At the lime of this writing, I am in 
the middle of writing a new book, 
entitled The Joy of Ham Radio — A 
Beginner's Guide , 

When I first began investigating 
ham radio, I felt that I was lost in a 
jungle full of tubes, circuits, wires, 
and strange people who crawled 
out of bed in the evening for 
OSOs, QSYs, and QRTs, I sympa- 
thize with today's innocent and 
bewildered beginner who is often 
on the border of pulling the plug 
and picking up another hobby. 

My book is to encourage the 
real newcomer who has a spark of 
interest but has no idea of what 
he's getting into, Learning some- 
thing new can be joyful. Ham ra- 
dio is not the exception. 

Besides the introduction, there 
are six basic chapters, two appen- 
dices (one with a glossary of 
ham-radio terminology and one 
with charts and tables) , and a sub- 
ject index for quick reference. 
Depending on the agreement 
between the publisher and me, 
I hope to have the Spanish edi- 
tion available not too long after 



its first LIS, printing in English. 

For me. trying to learn on my 
own was not easy at all. Trying to 
determine what equipment I 
should buy, how and where to in- 
stall my antennas, and all the oth- 
er juicy details, was like trying to 
nail jello to a barn door. 

Special Mote: Congratulations 
to my father-in-law, Jesus Becerril 
XETXJX, who just got his license 
after many years of interest in 
ham radio! In fact, he was the one 
who first got me started! 




YUGOSLAVIA 

Djurica Maietin YU7DR 
PO Box 132 
21400 Batka Palanka 
Yugoslavia 

I hope the information I will have 
for 73 International will be inter* 
esting because I work each day on 
afl HF bands and participate a lot 
in HF contests. Also, J am a ORG 
CW contester. 

The Vojvodina Award. On HF 
bands 1.8 to 28 MHz (no new 
bands), six contacts from Europe 
with YU7 or 4IM7, YT7 , or YZ7; two 
contacts DX, On VHF band (144 
MHz), three contacts from Eu- 
rope, one DX. 

Send GCR (no QSL cards) with 
8 IRCs or US. $1 to Savez Ra- 
dioamatera Vojvodine, Trg Lenji- 
na 10, 21000 Novi Sad, Yugo- 
slavia. 

Information about licenses can 
be had via SRJ, Box 48, 1 101 Bel- 
grade, Yugoslavia. 

All OSL cards for 407WCY, 
YTGARG t YZ7Q, YZ7L T YZ7ARG, 
YT7T, Y27DR are sure through 
YU7DR* 



108 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



The no- 



hole, on-glass, 
mbbile antenna that 

in 15-minutes. 




Capacitive coupling establishes highly 
tuned circuit through glass with no 
measurable signal loss. 

No ground plane: Full haffwave design — 
performance equal to practical 5/8 wave 
installations 

DUO-BOND mounting for firm, fast 
waterproof bonding. Removable without 
ging car or antenna 

No holes: No vehicle damage: fast, easy 
cable routing ^^ 

Four models for 2 meter 220 MHz and 
UHF amateur bands. 



^6 



the antenna specialists co 




s, 



a member of The Allen Group inc. 

12435 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Chip 44106 

Canada; A. C. Simmonds 4 Sons. Ltd. 



we design solutions. 



BENEFITS FOR YOU 

QST, QSL Bureau, Awards, Low Cost Insurance, Operating Aids, 
Government Liaison and More — Much More! 



MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 

Name 

Street 

City 



Call 



Prov./State 



PC/Zip 



S25 in US. S33 elsewhere (US funds) Licensed amateurs, or age 65 or over, upon submitting 
proof of age, may request the special dues rare of $20 in the U S S2S elsewhere, in US funds) 
Persons age 17 and younger may quality for specia* rates, write for application. 

For postal purposes, frfty percent of dues is allocated to QST. me balance for membership 



r - ^ 



Bank. No + 



The American Radio Relay League 
225 Main St. Newlngton, CT, 061 1 1 



Expires 
Expires 

USA 




HAM RADIO 
HOME STUDY 

NOVICE VOICE COURSE 




• Updated novice- voice questions 

• 6 stereo code 4 theory cassette tapes 

• 2 text books, code oscillator, key & battery 

• Color Ham Bands wall chart & frequency list 

• Sealed novice exam for a Ham friend to grw you the 
code ft theory test in your home 

• FCC license abpiicaton forms & instructions to your 
examiner Ideal for spouse A the kids! 

$49.95 



NOVICE CODE COURSE $39.95 

4 tape stero code course for learning the 
code from scratch plus a deluxe C W oscillator 

S0t 

NOVICE THEORY COURSE $19.95 

2 stereo tapes & 2 books for theory, 
including 5 wprn CW practice exam & 
examiner's packet for the CW test includes 
FCC rulebook, tool 

THE COiPlETE GEIEIAL $49.95 

4 tapes & 2 books tor theory plus 6 tape 
stereo code set for CW speed building 5 
wprn to 1 3 wpm plus all FCC paperwork 

GENERAL CODE COURSE $39.95 

6 tape stereo code course for CW speed 
building from 5 wprn to 13 worn, 

TECHNICIAN THEORY CUSS $1 9.95 

4 tape stereo theory plus fully illustrated 
theory boofc and FCC rulebook 
THE COMPLETE ADVANCED $49.95 
4 tapes & 2 books for theory plus 6 tape 
stereo general or extra class code course 
Specify whJch CW tapes you want 

ADVANCED THEORY CLASS $1 9,95 

4 tape stereo theory course plus fully 
illustrated theory book & FCC mlebook 
THE COMPLETE EXTRA $49.95 

4 tapes & 2 books for theory plus 6 tape 
stereo code set for CW speed building f3 
worn to 22 wpmH-J Includes all VEC and 

FCC paperwork? 

EXTRA CODE COUISE $39.95 

6 tape stereo code course for CW speed 
budding from 13 wpm to 22 wpm+a 

EXTRA THEORY CLASS $1 9.95 

4 tape stereo theory plus fully illustrated 
theory book and FCC rulebook 
GORDON WEST ELECTRONICS ROOK 
200 page marine electronics book plus 
mobile antenna hints. $9.95 

INDIVIDUAL CODE TAPES 

• 5 wpm Novice OS0 Test Prep Tape $995 

• 5 worn Random Code Practice $9 95 

• 5 wpm Symphonic Sleep Tape $9 95 

• 5-7 wpm Speed Builder $9.95 

• 7-10 wpm Speed Builder $9.95 

• 10 wpm Plateau Breaker OSfJs $9 95 

• 10-12 wpm Speerj Builder $995 

• 12-1 5 wpm Calls* Numbers Speed Buitt $995 

• 13-15 wpm Random Code Practice $995 

• 13 wpm Symphonic Sleep Tape $995 

• 13 wpm General OS0 Test Prep Tape $9 95 

• 13-15 wpm Speed Butter $995 

• f 7-19 wpm Speed BwkJer $995 

• 20-22 wpm Random Code Practra $9 95 

• 20 wpm Symphoric Sleep Tape $9 95 

• 20 wpm Ejrtra OSO Test Pnjp Tape $995 

Slow Code Tapes use 13 wpm character speed We 
ship most orders same day Add $4.00 P 1 H on the 
sets. Add Si 00 P & H on a smote tarn 



GORDON WEST RADIO SCHOOL 

2414 COLLEGE DR., COSTA MESA, CA 92*2* 

Mon.-Fr1. 1tMpm (714) 549-5000 



110 73 Amateur Radio • April, 1907 





ICOM 




IC-751A 

"NEW JJ 



• 100 KHz-30 MHz 

• FM Standard 

• 32 Memories 

• Q3K (Nominal Speed 40 WPM] 




ICOM 



IC-ju2AT 

* 140463 MHz 

* 10 Memories 

• 1W, L5W optional 

• 32 tones built-in 

IC-03AT 

« 220 to 224395 MHz 

• 2.5W r 5W Optional 

• Built in subtone 

• 10 Memories 





FT-767GX 



HF/VHF/UHF 
BASE STATION 

• Add Optional 6m, 2m & 70 cm Modules 
♦DualVFOs 

• Full CW Break-in 

• Lots More Features 




FT23/73R 

» Zmc-Alunimum Alloy Case 

* 10 Memories 

* 140 164 MHz, 440-450 MHz 

* 600 MAh Standard Opt, 5W 
New ' super handie" 




KENWOOD 



TS940S 

"DX-cellence" 





•Programmable Scanning 

• High Stability, Dual Digital VFO's 

• 40 Channel Memory 

• General Coverage Receiver 



KENWOOD 

TR2600 "special" 

• 2.5 W/300 MW 2 Metef HT 
LCD Readout ,* 



10 Memories 

Band And Memory Scan 



C.O.D.'s Welcome 
800-227-8011 








KENWOOD 



TR-2600 

.. r iabier-2Me»r 

(rancei^ 

• LCD Fteadotir 

» lOMfimn^ss Wr 
Litri.urri £iacii-up 

* Bartrj ana 
■Memory Scan 



TH-21AT 

• i wan 

• Opt. 500 M.A. 
Battery 



TM-2570 



■ First 70 WaTI FM Mobi<e * Firgj with Memory & 
AulorJiare* ■ 23Cti an nel Memory ■From 
Panel Programmable CTCSS 






f;:--; 



* Programmable Sea run i ng 
►High Stability Dual Digital tf^Q s 

* 40 Cnannei Memopy 

* General Covef age fler ei vat 



TS-940S 

"DX-cellenceT 



■227-7373 



« AtilNCO 
♦ ASTRON 

• mufti 



• BUTTERNUT 
•GUSHCRAFf 

• DAJVUft 

• HA*M< 

• HUSTLER 

• mm 

•ICOM 



• KENPRO 

• KENWOOD 

• LARSEN 

• HFJ 

• tAMi 

• MYEVIKIN^ 
•QUATRON 

• SANTEC 

• WELZ 

• YAE&U 



.■..•,., .-w.-.^. 



■■**.£:■ 



FT-209RH 

• 5 Watts 

• 10 Memories 

• LCD 

• Compact 



FT-2700R 

• Duo-Band Full Duplex 
•25 Watt 












mti+**mmMjm:i>miii.M*+*. 



■ 









■-. - ■. «H A: ... ■■*•• » 



FRG-96G0 



"5 Vv^^ -' \ v. ... . 



• 100 Memories 

* 60 MHZ- 905 MHZ Continuous 






*>1?4 



WM' 



Mb-, vCd' d 1 



525 East 70th Avenue, 1 WM, Mmm> CO * M22§ • 383-2S 



"When You Buy, Say 73 



n 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 109 





IC-745 



IC-751A 




ICOMI ,c % 




EPK ::::■ 



TM-2570A 






57 QX 



FT 980 CAT 
FT-209RH I 




FT-727R 




FT-767GX 




PAKRATT PK-64 



KANTRONIC8 § 

KPC2400 



PACKET AT 2400 BAUD 





KENWOOD 



TH-21 BT 



TS-930S 



90 




Britt's 2-Way Radio s*. & sarv.ce 



TS-940S 



TH-21 SA 




WELZ CORP, 

VSWR/POWER METERS 



2508 Atlanta Street 
Smyrna, Georgia 30080 



All Of These "Goodies' 1 And Many More At Super Savings, 
Come See Us Or Call 1-800-241-2027. 




Belmont Hills Shopping Center 
4404)402-8006 



VIS** 



CIRCLE 1 20 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



f 7 1 



£ SANTEC 




ST-20T 



here is the next generation Repeater 



MARK 4CR 



The only repeaters and controllers 
with REAL SPEECH! 



No other repeaters or controllers match 
Mark 4 in capability and features. That's 
why Mark 4 is the performance leader at 
amateur and commercial repeater sites 
around the world. Only Mark 4 gives you 
Message MasterTM real speech • voice 
readout of received signal strength, 
deviation, and frequency error * 4- 
channel receiver voting • clock time 
announcements and function control • 7- 
helical filter receiver • extensive phone 
patch functions. Unlike others, Mark 4 
even includes power supply and a 
handsome cabinet. 

Call or write for specifications on the 
repeater, controller, and receiver winners. 

See us at Dayton booths 106, 107, 108 



MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 

Division of Kendecom Inc. 
23 Elm Park, Groveland, MA 01834 (617) 372-3442 



Create messages just by talking. Speak any phrases or 
words in any languages or dialect and your own voice 
is stored instantly in solid-state memory. Perfect for 
emergency warnings, club news bulletins, and DX 
alerts. Create unique ID and tail messages, and the 
ultimate in a real speech user mailbox — only with a 
Mark 4. 






***^»tWi 



■*"**! 



iiiiiS 



■R>'^ 



2 meters 220 440 



■"26 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 111 







i FREE Consumer 
! Buyer's Guide 
J With Guaranteed 
• Lowest Prices 



■ 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
■ 
■ 

i 
i 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 
i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
■ 
■ 
■ 
i 



'Explains all about KM) channel 
Satellite TV and how lo shop 
for an earth station! 

•Lists GUARANTEED 
LOWEST PRICES, we will 

not be undersold, save 30-50 ^o 
over local dealer prices! 

SYSTEMS I .■irarthuwn. Orbitnw 10 'ft. C/KttMKk 
mesh di»h, motor drive, Feedhorn, TJK l.NBi. Complete 
system Is I IPS ^hipabk 1 Mr dish can be in*lallrtl In an 
bv ur and has a fcp > ear Marnuil) . 

Chaparral Siena II it ml Panatoniu C-600 



< haparrql Sierra I Vt Mi 
ChaparTiii ' iicycnncl* Ml 

Drake I SR 'Ml II 

Drake tSR EM Sit 

l>N HIMi J 1235 

DX 700S i »9B 

I uxor wm i 4HW 

Hum :<<»>k Jcaj t 

MaL-um I* $) 



SI 159 



NTS SRI IU 


$1097 


STS LSR 


S 979 


Tracker vm 


SCALL 


Trucker V 


SIIS7 


Tracker 1I/1JI 


S $79 


L. in Jen WOO 


SI 295 


L in Jun 7000 


SUlM 


1 :nJen WOO 


s <m 




The ne« S ATM AN Bij>ct\ Guide In *i fffcraurf r Tor an> 
pro%pCv'U l vi' Oi LurrcEit t\trih suhim obiter wfui *iiilis to 

: blj ■ 1 1 •_■ > on Rime brand %zHc1l..e pnkhictf* Buy 

direct, Do-U- Vnurs-tfll', mid save with SATMAN, I oil i'rec 
urdcrui^. rm «.ji[e<. LA* <!L only), major credit £UtU ac- 
cepted, hug* in-itock iftvcniorio a< lifcgjbfe, and Kim 1. 
tfiippinj anytthcie In I S. Ctsedk «nh BATMAN before 
you ti U > , r Hir ■fi/i 1 no/ ftr undmoUt' Cati no*n for your 
frc* 20 p4|ie SATM \n Buyer** dtitde. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

L, 

112 



1-800-472-8626 

l>305M-92-414fl tlfruoii 




SATMAN 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
1 
I 
l 
I 



501 7 V USLOC V.PEOWA IL 81614 

~ ™ m ™ dtp and iave « « » « 

73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 



I 

I 
I 
I 

I 

■ 



Afaoue and Beyond 

AR2002 

PROFESSIONAL MONITOR RECEIVER 

25- 550 MHz 
800 -1300 MHz 







Specifications: 

Receiving mode - Marrow band FM. Wide band FM & AM 

Receiver circuit - Microprocessor controlled Pll 

Frequency synthesized supemrfe. odyne type 

with rwgrHevet doubted balanced mixer 

Receiver IF - 750MHz. 45 03MHz. 5 5 MHz ( WFM i 

and456kHztNFM&AM- 

Sensitivity- NFM - 0.35 uV (l2dB SINACJi 
WFM- 1 .00 UV {1 2dB SINAO) 
AM-l.OOuV OOdBSN) 



Selectivity - NFM - 

WFM- 
AM ■- 



-7 5kHz{§ 6cB 
s 2GKH2 @ TOdB 
* 50kHz fa &J8 

± 250kHz (i 60dB 

- 5,0kHz (a 6dB 
± IflkHz (g 70dB 

Number of memory channel - 20 cfitniwfe 

Scan rale - S channels per second 

St afe- 6 seconds (urMHz 

Antenna conne Standard BNG type . 50- onm 

Audio output power - I watt at less thm 1Q% THD 

Power requirement - 12 to 14Vdc at 300 to 500mA 

■andwaiQhi 5.-4*Wx3JS"H x 7 B8"D. 2.6 fbl 

Options: 

adied mobiie moir 
RS 



AR2002 

ProfcssoH/ Monitor fceem 

5455.00 

^fitotw ms ¥M S2T 30 tax) 

Wsa and MasterCard accepted 
Prices mvtutfes' shipping & tmndtmg 

COD slightly higf- 



22511 Aspan Street. Lake Forest, CA 92630-6321 

CaliL'Alaska (7141 581-4900 

Facsimile (714) 768-4410(not a phone) 

TOLL FREE 1-800-523-6366 

J ^279 

r communications, inc. 



CALLBOOKS 




The "Flying Hors 
sets the standards 

Continuing a 66 year tradition, there are 
three new Call books for 1987. 

The North American CaTIbook lists the calls, 
names, and address information for licensed 
amateurs in all countries from Canada to 
Panama including Greenland, Bermuda, and 
the Caribbean islands plus Hawaii and the 
U.S. possessions. 

The International CaUhook lists trie 
amateurs In countries outside North 
America. Coverage includes South America, 
Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific area. 

The 1987 Callbook Supplement is a new Idea 
In Callbook updates; It lists the activity in 
both the North American and International 
Callbooks. Published June l t 1987, this 
Supplement will Include all the new licenses, 
address changes, and call sign changes for 
the preceding 6 months. 

Publication date for the 1987 Callbooks is 
December 1, 1986. See your dealer or order 
now directly from the publisher. 



□ North American Callbook 
IncL Shipping within USA $26.00 

Inc.* shipping to foreign countries 30.00 

D International Callbook 
IncL shipping within USA $28.00 

incl. shipping to foreign countries 30.00 

Q Callbook Supplement, published June 1st 
Incl. shipping within USA $13.00 

Incl. shipping to foreign countries 14.00 

SPECIAL OFFER 

a Both n.a. & International Callbooks 
Incl. Shipping within USA $53,00 

incl, shipping to foreign countries 58.00 

************ 

Illinois residents please add 6Ve% tax. 
All payments must be In U.S. funds. 




Ilbook 



RADIO AMATEUR 

OOK INC. 

De pt , B 

925 Sherwood Or. t Box 247 

LJike Btuff, | L 60044, USA 



Tel: (312) 234-6600 





?,7?SW 



BULLETIN 

CALL US 
NOW! 



^^j*ftf^ .jfrj sfe-^te^ ^^W^j^. ^A.' ,. 




^V -\jr**_>^ i^j-hj^j i^mwv^j 



Your Ham Dollar Goes 
Further At , . . 



When it comes lo 

FAST DELIVERY. HONEST DEALING and 

PROMPT/DEPENDABLE S-E-R-V-l-C-E back-up. 

We dan t just advertise ii — WE GIVE IT' 




AMATEUR CENTER 



In 1937, Stan Burghardt (W0ET), because of hfs intense interest in 
amateur radio, began selling and servicing amateur radio equipment 
in conjunction with his radio parts business, We stand proud of this 
long-lasting tradition of Honest Dealing, Quality Products and 
Dependable "S-E-R-V-l-C-E"! 

Above aU f we fully intend to carry on this proud tradition with even 
more new product lines plus the same "fair* treatment you've come 
to rely on. Our reconditioned equipment is of the finest quafity with 30, 
60 and even 90-day parts and labor warranties on selected pieces. 
And always remember: 

— WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL — 



NYE 

P ALOMAR 

RADIO CALLE500K 

RITRON 

ROHM 

TELEX7HYSAIN 

TEN-TEC 

TRIO-KENWOOD 

UNADIUA/REYCO 

YAESU 



t&e 




SELECTION 



SE-RV-I-C-E 



SATISFACTION! 



AERICA'5 MOST RELIABLE AMATEUR RADIO DEALER" 

SELL-TRADE 

New & Reconditioned 

Ham Equipment 

Call or Write Us Today For a Quote! 
You']] Find Us 10 be Courteous, Knowledgeable 

and Honest 

phone (605)886-7314 



AEA 


BELDEN 


l-GQM 


AJNCO 


BENCHER 


j5C 


AME9HR0* 


BIRD 


KANTRQNICS 


AMPHENO'L 


BUTTERNUT 


KDK 


ptfp sjppLY 


CENTURION 


mm 


ANIEK 


ces 


LAR5EN 


ANTENNA 


CU SMC RAFT 


MFJ 


SPECIALISTS 


DIAWA 


MlNt-?RQQUCT5 


A5TRGN 


ENCOMM 


MIRAGE 


6&w 


HU5TLER 


M05ELEV 



STORE HOURS: 

9-5 fM. fCJTJ 
MONO AT thru £RI PAT 

OPEN VAT JRDAT5 
fromi-l P.M. [CST) 

CLOSED 
SUNDAYS. 'HOLIDAYS 



^fi«H 



HAIL AND 

TELtmONE 

ORDERS 

WELCOMED" 
TKfry'i* eiv 

taunntii' I 



Write today for our latest Bulletin/Used Equipment List. 



92 



P.O. Box 73 

208 East Kemp 

VVatertdwn,S0572G1 



lUqclerCfifd) 


WW 

1 



PAKRATT"" Model PK-64 





PAKRATr 1 Model PK-232 

AEAS FINEST 

. . .'Voir' Available — Especially For You! 

CALL OR WRITE FOR SPECIAL QUOTE 




FRE 




MINNESOTA & ALASKA or DX CALL 2, 
or 612-255-0855 



ANTENNAS 



hy-gain 



Hi) 




cushcraft 

BUTTERNUT 




Lof sen Antennas 



ALfMAVCUA 



irar <s> 



ALLIANCE 





SANTEC 



® 



eikpri 



PREASSEMBLED DIPOLES, REMOTE AND MANUAL COAXIAL 
SWITCHES. CONNECTORS, COAX-SEAL, BALUNS, INSULATORS, 
ANDREW MELIAX. NYLON &UPPORT ROPE, ETC - CALL! 



• We Ship Worldwide 
Helpful, Persona! 



^ Service 




innr 



CORSAIR II 




AMiRiTKOH 

HF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS 





TUNERS & ACCESSORIES 




ROTORS 




The Telex/Hy -gain CD 45 II, Ham 
IV, T2X, and HDR-300 are our top 
sellers. Excellent parts availability 
and manufacturer support. 
We also offer Kenpro rotors. 
Our choice for OSCAR az-el rotor 
systems. Call for pricing! 




ANTENNAS 
CALL US FOR YOUR NEB 

WIRE & CABLE 

BODENCOAX 

RG-213/U{8267) / Be!den99l3 0.40 /0,42 ft. 

RG-8/U (8237) / RG-8/U (8214) 0,32/0,35 

RG-SX(9258) / RG-11A/U(SZ61). 0.19/0.37 

RG 58AJLK8259) / RG59/U(8241) 0.13/0.14 

450 ohm ladder line . CLIO 

COPPERWELD ANTENNA WIRE 

Solid: 12 ga. / 14 ga 012/ 0.10 ft 

Stranded: 14 ga, ...„„, , . ......010 

ROTOR CABLE 

Std. (6-22, 2 16) / Hvy Dty {6-1 8 H 2-16)... 0.19/0.35 

Others in stock! 

TOWERS 

FREE STANDING: 

HBX40 / HDBX40 _ ..,$ 198.00/ 249,00 

HBX48 / HDBX48 265.00/325.00 

HBX56 I BX64 „„, ,.335.00/370,00 

Today's best tower buy! Freight additional. 

GUYED TOWERS 

25G /45G .... $46,00/109.00 

TB-3 Bearing ...... • 49.95 

Full line of Rohn accessories, Freight additional. 

FOLD-OVER TOWERS 

FK2546 / FK2558 $869 00/929,00 

FK2568 / FK4544... 97900/ 1 179,00 

FK4554 / FK4564...„. „... ,..,.,1279.00/1369.00 

Fold-overs shipped FREIGHT PREPAID. 
Prices 10% higher in western states. 

HY4UN 

For crank-up, self-supporting towers we recommend 
Hy-gain's series. The HG-37SS, HG52SS, HG-54HD, 
& HG-70HD represent "top drawer" quaiity. 
REBATES UNTIL 9/30/ee! Shipped freight prepaid! 

PHILLYSTRAN 

Electrical fy transparent guy systems in stock! 



VISA/MASTERCARD £ utuoran : 







NCR Box 43 
Menifield, MN S6465 




ICROPHONE 

Now Keypad Programmable 




tfaSl 



CES TOO KEYPAD 
1 PROGRAMMABLE OPTIONS 



Automatic dialing and automatic AN I 

• Fourth column tones 

* Dialing speed changes and pauses with or 
without PTT 

• Manual dialing while in automatic mode 

CES 700 STANDARD FEATURES 

• Audible sidetone • Automatic PTT 
+ Adjustable levels for any radio 

* Automatic microphone muting 
■ Back lit sealed keypad 

* Last number re -dialing 

PROVEN CES RELIABILITY 

♦ Crystal controlled frequency 

• Field serviceable • Full year warranty 



Make The 
Connection 




Call us now, toff free — l-aOO-327 y»S6 

Communications Electronics Specialties, Inc. 
803C a Orlando Am, Winter Park, FL 32789 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Funtaiia CA 

Complete lines- 1 COM, Mirage, KLM, 
Urwn, Asiron, B & W. Over 4000 electron- 
ic products for the hobbyist. Also CB and 
bjsiness radios. Serving you fruiti a 6000 sq. 
ft. tforc. bontanu Electronics, Btf28 Sierra 
Ave., FiMttana CA 9233S, 822-7710. 



San Jose CA 

Bay Area's newest amateur radio store. New 
& Used amateur radio sales $- service. We 
feature Kenwood, J COM. Azden, Yaesu, 
Ten -Tec, Santec & many more. Shaver Ra- 
dio, Inc., 1 775 A S. Winchester Blvd., 
Campbell CA 95908* 370-6*65, 



New Castle DE 

Factory authorized dealer! Yaesu,, 1COM. 
Ten-Tec, KDK, Kenwood, AEA, Kantron- 
ics.Santct. Full line of accessories. No sales 
tax in Delaware. One mile off 1-^5. Dela- 
ware Amateur Supply, 71 Meadow Road, 
New Castle DE 19720, 328-772S* 



Miami FL 

Casa Marconi. Inc. FYe-owned communica- 
tions equipment. We do repairs. Send SASE 
for prices. Casa Marconi, Inc., 7149 SW 
Sth Street, Miami FL 33144, 264-8443 



Preston ID 

Ross WB7BYZ has the largest stock of ama- 
teur gear in the Inlermountain West and the 
best prices. Call me for all your ham needs, 
Ross Distributing, 78 So. Slate, Prestim ID 
83263, 852-0830, 

Berry NH 

Servmg the ham community with new and 
used equipment. We stock and service most 
major lines: AEA. Astron, &&W d Cushcraft, 
Encomm, Hy-Gain, Hustler, ICOM. Ken- 
wood, KLM, Larson, Mirage, Mosley; 
hooks, rotors t cable and connectors. Busi- 
ness hours Mon-SaL 10-5, Thursday 10-9. 
Closed Sun. /Holidays. Rivendell Electron- 
les, 8 Londonderry Road, Perry NH 
0303«, 434-5371. 



DEALERS 

Ytmr company name and message can contain up to 25 words for as little as $199 
yearly (prepaid), or $50 for three months (prepaid). No mention of mailorder 
business or area code permitted. Directory text and payment must reach us 60 days 
in advance of publication. For example, advertising for the July 1 87 issue must be 
in our hands by May 1st. Mail to 73 Amateur Radio, WGE Center Peterborough. 
NH 03458, ATTN; Hope Currier. 



L 



ROPAGATION 

































Jim Gray W1XU 
73 Staff 




EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: | 




GMT: « fiJ 


64 Ob Oft ID 


12 1* 16 IB 30 32 




ALASKA 














20 


20 










ARGENTINA 
















15 


' 


15 


13 


15 




AUSTRALIA 












40 


20 


20 






13 


15 




CANAL ZONE 


20 


40 


i.U 


4 


40 




20 


15 


15 


lb 


1 3 


2i.: 




ENGLAND 


40 


40 


40 








20 


20 


20 


20 








HAWAII 




20 






40 


kO 


20 


20 








15 




INDIA 














20 


20 










JAPAN 














20 


20 












MFyirri 




-;j 


&Q 


40 


40 




20 


15 


15 


15 


15 












PHILIPPINES 














20 


20 












PUERTO ftJCO 




40 


40 


40 






20 


J 5 


1 5 


15 


15 






SOUTH AFRICA 


















13 


15 


33 






U. 5.5. R. 














20 


70 


















HC ST COAST 






80 


so 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 


20 








CENTRAL 


UNITED 


STATES TO: 




ALASKA 


->0 


20 










i ": 










ARGENTINA 




















15 


15 


15 




AUStHjALlA 


13 


20 








40 


JO 


20 








15 




CANAL ZONE 


20 


zo 


40 


40 


4Q 


,0 






15 


15 


15 


20 




ENGLAND 




40 


i.i 










20 


20 


20 


20 






HAWAII 


[5 


20 


20 


2G 


40 


-J 


40 










L5 




INDIA 
















20 


20 










JAPAN 
















20 


:o 










MEXICO 


20 


20 


40 


40 


H 


40 






15 


I r > 


15 


20 




PHILIPPINES 
















20 


2G 










PUERTO HI CO 


20 


20 


40 


-i 


40 


40 






15 


15 


19 


20 




SOUTH AFRICA 




















13 


15 


20 




U £. S. H. 
















20 


■i 










WESTERN 


UNITED 


STATES TO: 




ALASKA 


20 


20 


2W 




40 


4(1 


40 


i0 






15 




ARGENTINA 


13 


20 




40 


4 


40 










15 


15 




AUSTRALIA 




[b 


20 


2D 






." 


40 












CANAL ZONE 






20 


20 


^0 


.':i 


.'i. 


20 








15 




ENGLAND 


















20 


2 








HAWAII 


15 


20 


2Q 


40 


40 


40 


40 










1 -., 




INOlA 




20 


20 






















JAPAN 


20 


2.0 


20 






4 


40 


AU 






21. 


2U 


. 


MEXICO 






20 


?\\ 


2n 


20 


20 


^^^^— 








t 5 




PHILIPPINES 


15 












40 




20 










PUERTO RICO 






20 


20 


20 


2 a 


20 


:•:. 








1 3 




SOUTH AFRICA 




















15 


15 






U S. 5. ft. 


















20 










EAST COAST 




SO 


8ij 


hO 


40 


40 


40 


!H1 


20 


20 | 







G= Good, F = Fair, P = Poor. 

April will be an excellent month tor HF DX, Due to seasonal improvements 
and increasing sunspot activity, the Ionosphere wilt be capable of providing 
daylight-to-dark OX openings on 20, 15, and occasionally 10. The poorest 
propagation will be before the 1 0th of the month due to an active geomagnet- 
ic field. After the 10th, only occasional disturbances wili disrupt east-west 
path propagation. 



APRIL 

SUM MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT 




1 

F 


2 

F-P 


3 

P-F 


4 
F-P 


5 

p 


6 

P-F 


7 

F-G 


8 

G-F 


9 

F-P 


10 

F 


11 

G 


12 

G 


13 

G 


14 

G 


15 

G 


16 

G 


17 

G 


18 

G 


19 

G 


20 

G 


21 

G 


22 

G 


23 

G 


24 

G-F 


25 

F 


26 

F-G 


27 

G 


28 

G 


29 

G 


30 

G 





114 73 Amateur Radio * April, 1987 



PREAMPLIFIER 







Can't hear the weak ones when conditions 
are bad? Receiver lacks sensitivity on 20, 15 
or 10? Gel the world famous Patomar pre- 
amplifier. Tunes *rom 160 10 6 meters. Gives 
20 db extra gam and a low noise figure to 
bring out those weak signals. Reduces im- 
age and spurious responses too. 

An RF sensing circuit bypasses the pre- 
amplifier during transmit. The bypass han- 
dles 350 watts. 

Model P-410X (tor 115-v AC) Or Model 
P-412-X (for 12-v DCJ $149.95, Model P-408 
(SWL receive only for 115-v AQS 129.95. Add 
S4 shipping/handling in U.S. & Canada. Cal- 
ifornia residents add sales lax. 



TUNER-TUNER 




> Tune your tuner without 

transmuting! 
* Save that rig! 

Do you use an antenna tuner? Then you 
need the new PalomarTuner-Tunerto tune It 
to your operating frequency without trans- 
mitting. Just listen to the Tuner-Tuner's 
noise wffh your receiver. Adjust your tuner 
for a null and presto I you have 1:1 SWR. It's 
as simple as that. 

Easy to Install. Works with all rigs. Elimi- 
nates tuneup damage. Your rig will love It! 

Modef PT34Q $99,95 + $4 shipptngrtiandl- 
ing in U.S. & Canada, California residents 
add sales tax. 



fc] 




* In -J? 



Send for FREE catalog that shows our com 
piete line of noise bridges, SWR meters, pfe- 
amplifiers, loop antennas, VLF converters, 
audio filters, batuns, RTTY equipment, to- 
roids and more. ^2?e 



PALOMAR 



m 



BOX 455, ESCONDIDO. CA 92025 
Phone: (619) 747-3343 



1 'When You Buy, Say 73" 






: *--&% 



"Universal" Terminal Interface for 
Computer or non -computer operation 



^Matfc Memory Keyer adds 
programmable excellence to CW 



Antenna Noise Bridge/ 300 kHz to 30 MHz 

SWL Antenna/ VLF Converter/Touch 

Tone Decoder for Remote Control Reception 



f I * 



25 MHz Oscilloscope with Buirt-in 
Component Tester 



FCC Certified Terminal Node Controller 



Automatic Antenna Tuner 



Deluxe QRP CW Transceiver and Power 
Supply 



T 



A very special electronics and computer 

guide that brings you the exerting world of 

amateur radio kitbuilding and much more 

The Heathkit* Catalog is filled with 
high-quality HAM radio products that you'll 
enjoy. Plus you'll get the unique challenge 
and satisfaction of kitbuilding. So send 
NOW for your FREE Heathkit Catalog, 

Yes! / want to see what 
kitbuifding can do for me. 

Send to: Heath Company, Dept. 011-522 
Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022 



Name 



Heathkit i 



Heotn 



Company 



I 



Address 



City 



Ktubvtivy tf Lent* 
B*Umwu CWpof Hion 



AM-448R1 



State 



Zip 



I 

I 
I 

I 
I 

I 



J 

73 Amateur Radio • April, 1987 115 







lall Toll Free — 9am • 6pm Mon . - Fti., 9am - 2pm Sat. 
In Missouri Call — 816-741-6118 



r\ 



-EUa 



cfl 



m 



m 



en 
■o 
m 
O 




g 



102 N.W. Business Park Une. Kansas City, MO64150 816- 741-8118 



TRADE INS ACCEPTED 

MasterCard — VISA — COD Welcome 



KENWOOD 



*■*'? s. -** 



ten 



^ . / 



TS940S DX-ceitenca" 

• Programmable Scanning 

■ High Stability, Dual Digital VFOa 

■ 40 Channel Memory 

* General Coverage Receiver 



KENWOOD 



r 



■A 



TS440S 



I I I I 



'DX+CITING' 



KENWOOD 



* Jt% .** i+ 



TM2570 



ALL NEW 



• 100% Duty Cycle 

• 100 memories 

• Direct Keyboard Entry 

• Optional Built-in AT 

On Sale Now, Call For Price! 



• Fina 70 W*t FM Mobile 

• Firsi With Memory & Auto Dialer 

• 23 Channel Memory 

• Front Panel Programmable CTCSS 



FT-757GX CAT SYSTEM" 



• All Mode Transceiver 
*DualVFO"s 

• FullBreakmCW 

• 100% Duly Cycle 



CALL 

FOR BEST 

PRICE! 



KENWOOD 



TH-215A 

"FULL FEATURED 2m HT n 

• HI lB3MHzl*K«fe« 

• 144-1*3 MHz Trvwrtit 

• 2 S* Output (Sw 

Octl&n«J) 

• lOM#mortfta 

• Built-in CTCSS 

Eftcodfrr 

• Nina Types of Scanning 



PT 7C7AV HFn/HF/UHF 
T I * / D f \J A BASE STATION 
« Add Optional 6m, 2m & 70cm Modules 

* Dual VFO's 

■ Full CW Break-in 

* Lots More Features 



FT23/73R 

* Zinc -Alummum Alloy Case 
■ 10 Memories 

* 140-164 MH/ 440-450 MHz 

* 600 MAh Standard Opt 5w 
New "super handle" 



ICOM 



IC-735 "**> 

Can you put a pnee tag on 
mliamM/'* How ICOM offers a 
ONE YEAR WARRANTY on its 
HF Transceivers & Receivers 
purchased after Augusi V 1686 



mfd 



IC-751A 



_ ^^^^^^ ^^^ m — 


I DICOM ' 





FT-727R 

DUAL BAND HT' 



5 Watts on Bom 
2m & 440 MHz 
10 Memories 
Battery Saver 
Remote Computer 
Control Capability 



NEW 



• K»KHl-30MHz 

• FM Standard 

• 32 Memories 

• QSK (Nominal Speed 40 WPM) 



IC-38A 

• Full 25W, 5W low 

• 21 memories 

• Sub tones built in 
FJX 216-230 MHz 
CALL FOR BEST PRJCE 



Kanti 



KAM 



IMt MHWM&m 



Kantronics All Mode 

• CW, RTTY, ASCII , AMTOR, HF & VH F Packet 

• RS-232/TTL, Universal Gompat ability 

• T ran am It and Receive CW 8-99 wpm, RTTYMSCII 45-300 
Baud, AftG, FEC ( SELFEC. Listen AR0 p VHF and 
HF Packet 



ICOM 

IC-jL(2AT 

• 140-163 MHz 

• 10 Memories 

• 1W. 1 5 W options! 

• 32 tones built-in 



J^& 



IC-03AT 

• 220 to 224 995 M Hi 
*25W. SWOpbonaJ 
■ Huilt m subione 

* 10 Memories 



MFJ 1270 



• TTi serial port 

* Latest AX 25 version 
2.0 sol (ware 

• True Data Carrier delect lor HF 

* 16K Ram 



ANTENNA SALE | 


HYQA1N ON SALE 


KENRRO.KR400 $14900 


HUSTLER 25% off mobile 


.KR500S1&U00 


CUSHCRAFT 


, ...KR540GA $299.00 


r\LM 


. ...... KR600 $229,00 


BUTTERNUT 


COLUMBIA CABLE 


HF6V $118.00 


...<RG-flX.15fft. 


HF2V $11000 


RG-8 Superflex,2o7ft, 


AEA 144SR $42.00 


99l3Type.39/fl. 


AVANTL.151.3G $32,00 


Rotor Cable, 167ft 


QUATRON 


H.D. Rotor Cable, 31 /ft 


CALL FOR BEST PRICES I 



ASTRON 

COnPORATIQN 



#31** 



Power Supply 




PK232 

• Make any RS-232 compatible computer 
orterminalacomplete digital operating 
position. 

• Morse, Baudot, ASCII, AMTOR, Packet 

• Loaded with features. 





* RS12A 


S68 




* RS20A 


$68 




•RS20M 


$105 




• VS20M 


$125 




• RS35A 


$133 




■ RS35M 


SV49 




■ VS35M 


$165 




* RS50A 


1180 




•R550M 


$215 




• RM50A 


$219 




• VS50M 


$229 



■ VS35M 


. $165 


H 


* RS50A 


£18® 




•R550M 


$215 




• RM50A 


$219 




• VS50M 


$229 











HUSTLER 




MOST ORDERS SHIPPED SAME DAY 




J.I.L 



KANTRONICS 






KDI 



One of the most 

complex operating controls of our 

high-performance mobiles. 



You don't have to sacrifice per 
fbrmance to gain simplicity in 
your mobile operation. 

Yaesu's 2-meter FT-2URH and 
440-MHz FT-711RH give you all 
the performance you look for in 
a sophisticated, microprocessor- 
cnntrolled mobile. 

With controls that couldn't 
be more straightforward and 
easy to learn. Which means no 



operating complexities to inter- 
fere with your driving. 

In fact, if vou own our hand- 
held FT-23R, youVe already 
learned how to use our FT-211RH 
and FT-711RH . Because all three 





radios are based on the very 
same technology. 

lb begin with, you get an 
autodialer rnic with 10 lithium 
backed memories, each capable 
of storing any key sequence 
up to 22 digits long. 

Plus you get: 45 watts 
output (35 watts on 440 
MHz). LCD readout. 10 
memories that store fre- 
quency, offset and PL tone. 
(7 memories can store odd 
splits.) Scan all memories or 
selected memories at 2 frequen- 
cies per second. Band scan at 10 
frequencies per second. Ik offset 
storage. Priority channel scan. 



Timing via tuning knob, or up/ 
down buttons. PL tone board 
(optional). PL display. 

Independent PL memory per 
channel. PL encode and decode. 
DCD power output and "S*-meter 
display. Eight-key control pad. 
Keypad lock. High /low power 
switch (low power: 5 watts VHF. 
3 watts UHF). 

What's more, each radio is 
perfect for overhead mounting. 
Just remove a few screws and 
flip the control panel 180.° 

Discover the 2-meter FT- 
211RH and 440-MHz FT-711RH 
at your nearest Yaesu dealer 
today. If you can turn a knob 
and push a button, you'll have 
high-performance mobile opera- 
tion mastered. 




^-165 







feesu USA 17210 Edwards Road Gorrftos, i JA 90703 | 213 ) 4O4-2T0O. Repair Servic Parts: (213) 404484' 

^aesa Cincinnati Service Center 9070 Gold Park Dm e, Hamilton, OH 45011 ?74 3100. 

Prhvs.iml mm ■ n rations sijlywi Ui rtimtgt' withnut --nation PL is a roistered rrufhtmart uF Motorola, Jrtti. 




... pacesetter in Amateur radio 



kZ 



6 



Matching Pair 



TS-711A/811A 



TheTS-711A 2 meter and theTS-811A 
70 centimeter all mode transceivers 
are the perfect rigs for your VHF and 
UHF operations. Both rigs feature 
Kenwood's new Digital Code Squelch 
(DCS) signaling system. Together, 
they form the perfect "matching pair" 
for satellite operation. 

Highly stable dual digital VFOs, 

The 10 Hz step, dual digital VFOs offer 
excellent stability through the use of a 
TCXO (Temperature Compensated 
Crystal Oscillator), 

Large fluorescent multi -function 
display 

Shows frequency. RIT shift. VFO A/B, 
SPLIT. ALERT, repeater offset, digital 
code, and memory channel. 

i 40 multifunction memories. 
Stores frequency, mode, repeater off- 
set and CTCSS tone. Memories are 
backed up with a built-in lithium battery. 



VHF/UHF all-mode base stations 





• Versatile scanning functions. 
Programmable band and memory scan 
(with channel lock-out), "Center-stop" 
tuning on FM, An "alert" function lets 
you listen for activity on your priority 
channel while listening on another 
frequency, A Kenwood exclusive! 

• RF power output control, 

Continuously adjustable from 2 to 
25 watts. 



• Automatic mode selection, 

You may select the mode manually 
using the front panel mode keys. 
Manual mode selection is verified in 
International Morse Code. 

•All-mode squelch. 

• High performance noise blanker 

• Speech processor. 

For maximum efficiency on SSB 
and FM. 

• IF shift. 

• "Quick -Step" tuning. 

Vary the tuning characteristics from 
"conventional VFO feel" to a stepping 
action. 

• Built-in AC power supply. 
Operation on 12 volts DC is also 
possible. 

• Semi break-in CW, with side tone, 

• VS-1 voice synthesizer (optional) 

More TS-711A/811 A information is 
available from authorized Kenwood 
dealers. 




Optional accessories. 

IF-1QA computer interface 
IF-232C level translator 
CD-1Qcall sign display 
SP-430 external speaker 
VS-1 voice synthesizer 
TU-5 CTCSS tone unit 
MB-430 mobile mount 



• MC-48B 16-key DTMF, MC-43S UP/ 
DOWN mobile hand microphones 

•SW-200A/B SWR/power meters: 
SW-200A 1.8-150 MHz 
SW-200B 140-450 MHz 

• SWT-1 2-m antenna tuner 

• SWT-2 70-cm antenna tuner 

• PG-2U DC power cable 



• MC-60A, MC-80. M085 
deluxe desk top microphones 

Complete service manuals are available tor all Trio-Kenwood transceivers anti most accessories 
Specifications and prices are subject to change without notice or obligation 



KENWOOD 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 West Walnut Street 
Com plan. California 90220